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High School Dropouts

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NEWS
September 21, 2008
Last year, about 27,000 Maryland high school students dropped out of school before graduating. That was nearly a quarter of the state's Class of 2007, and Marylanders pay dearly for it. A study by the Maryland Public Policy Institute estimates that each class of high school dropouts costs the state about $50 million every year in lost tax revenues, higher Medicaid costs and the expenses of incarceration - dropouts are twice as likely as graduates to...
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NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 19, 2012
Epidemics typically generate an emotional response from the afflicted, especially where the disease brings about great carnage. Yet, one of the most gruesome conditions within contemporary America proceeds apace, with only periodic bursts of serious attention. The epidemic in question is fatherlessness, and the cultural consequences are frightening. A sampling of the damage from statistics researched by "The Fatherless Generation" project : •90 percent of homeless and runaway children are from fatherless homes; •85 percent of children who suffer from behavioral disorders are from fatherless homes; •71 percent of high school dropouts are from fatherless homes; •Nearly 60 percent of all children living in poverty reside in a single female parent household; and •Daughters raised without an involved father are 53 percent more likely to marry as teenagers, 71 percent more likely to have children as teenagers, 164 percent more likely to experience a premarital birth, and 92 percent more likely to get divorced.
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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1997
As a member of the National Guard's Military Youth Corps program, Don Blontz took off in a four-seater Cessna at Martin State Airport yesterday and landed 20 minutes later a changed person."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2010
Kenneth S. Battye, a retired Baltimore stockbroker and a lifelong proponent of the "value theory" of investing who had a career at Legg Mason that spanned 55 years, died Nov. 16 of complications from dementia at his Lutherville home. He was 97. Mr. Battye, who was the son of a stockbroker and a homemaker and raised in Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, learned a lasting lesson about the value of earning and saving money at an early age. He was about 10 years old when he and his life savings — a pocketful of change that had taken him six months to save — quickly vanished.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - Struggling to boost its ranks, the Army is recruiting a higher number of high school dropouts and recruits who score in the lowest category on military aptitude tests, raising concerns among senior officers and defense analysts that the quality of the force will suffer. Five months into the recruiting year, the percentage of recruits in the active-duty Army without high school diplomas is more than double the percentage of last year. The number of recruits who scored the lowest on the aptitude test has also more than doubled and is the highest since 2001.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1997
For hundreds of high school dropouts, a program at Aberdeen Proving Ground has provided a second chance at a diploma -- even if it meant enduring early morning roll calls and blue uniforms that led others to nickname them "Smurfs."But in the face of severe budget cuts for the U.S. Department of Defense program, officials who run the Freestate Challenge have cut some services and face a funding shortage. They're hoping a $500,000 state grant will help keep the federally funded program afloat.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Elaborating on his theory that America's middle class is being rapidly transformed into an "anxious class" squeezed between the wealthy and chronically poor, Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich will urge business leaders in Dallas on Tuesday to develop ways to help workers increase their skills and add to their sense of security.He calls for a broad commitment by private business to help train and educate workers and even raises a veiled threat of federal intervention in the form of required contributions to such training if they do not do so.His comments, prepared for a speech he will give before a conference of the National Alliance of Business but made public here yesterday, describe the nation as moving rapidly ahead in a period of economic expansion, but at the expense of the workers propelling it.He illustrates this by pointing to widening gaps in wages of educated and uneducated workers and to a tendency among many business leaders to focus on competition overseas while ignoring the lives and welfare of workers at home.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1998
With more and more deserving entries, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said it's getting harder to select the winners of the Mayor's Business Recognition Awards. But selected they were, and yesterday the winners of the 24th annual event were given their due at the Hyatt Regency Baltimore across from the Inner Harbor.The awards, sponsored by the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Baltimore Development Corp., honor businesses that have shown outstanding community leadership and service to the city. This year's event paid tribute to deeds ranging from children's immunization to employment opportunities for high school dropouts.
NEWS
June 3, 2003
NO COUNTRY in the world puts people behind bars at a greater rate than the United States. Even as several states were closing prisons, the national prisoner population had risen to 2,019,234 as of April. For every 100,000 Americans, 702 are in jail or prison, according the U.S. Department of Justice. Russia, the second-place finisher among the nations, jails 665 per 100,000. While some studies show crime rates go down as the prison population goes up, the rising prison population reflects serious failures: of family, of education, of social policy and of rehabilitation.
NEWS
By Joseph A. Fernandez | September 8, 1994
AS EARLY as the year 2010, Hispanics may become the U.S.' largest racial minority.Even sooner, possibly by the year 2000, most of the country's children will be Hispanic.This is why it is so disconcerting that while high school dropout rates of most racial and ethnic groups have declined over the past generation, that of Hispanics has shown little sign of decreasing.According to a U.S. General Accounting Office report, in 1990 the dropout rate for Hispanics between the ages of 16 and 24 was about 30 percent.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,sara.neufeld@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
Eighteen-year-old Christian Anderson was just two credits shy of graduation at City College when he dropped out of high school last spring. He was trying to figure out a way to earn a GED when, a few days ago, he got a call from his old guidance counselor. Thanks to that call, Anderson found himself yesterday at Dunbar Middle School, where the city school system was holding the first of two "resource fairs" to help dropouts finish their education. He arranged to take his final two classes - in English and world history - through an alternative program, and he talked with a Marine Corps recruiter about enlisting in January.
NEWS
September 21, 2008
Last year, about 27,000 Maryland high school students dropped out of school before graduating. That was nearly a quarter of the state's Class of 2007, and Marylanders pay dearly for it. A study by the Maryland Public Policy Institute estimates that each class of high school dropouts costs the state about $50 million every year in lost tax revenues, higher Medicaid costs and the expenses of incarceration - dropouts are twice as likely as graduates to...
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | November 26, 2006
George Gershwin: His Life and Work Howard Pollack University of California Press / 884 pages / $39.95 Introduced at Aeolian Hall in New York City on Feb. 12, 1924, by Paul Whiteman and his Palais Royal Orchestra, Rhapsody in Blue received three curtain calls - and became one of the best-known concert works of the 20th century. It "is all New York, all America," George Gershwin, the 26-year-old composer, explained. "It is a picnic party in Brooklyn or a dark-skinned girl singing and shouting her blues in a Harlem cabaret.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | March 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In an ideal world, the rising tide of economic recovery would lift everyone's boat, as John F. Kennedy used to say. Unfortunately, we live in the real world, where the boom that began a decade ago has left one demographic group, in particular, stuck on the bottom of the economic lake: undereducated black males. So say new studies by poverty experts from Harvard, Princeton, Columbia and other major universities and think tanks. The experts have taken a closer look at the condition of those who are the least connected to attentive parenting, neighborhood role models and good schools that most of us take for granted.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2005
It was easy to spot John Carty among the 142 graduates at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's commencement on Friday: With his weathered, stoic look and a beard that covers much of his face, Carty was the one who could easily be mistaken for a member of faculty. Or for what he until recently was: a farmer. "Farmers have taught me a lot in my life," Robert D. Pugatch, a medical school professor, said during the ceremonies, "but I had never taught a farmer." The professor paused for a moment and smiled, a show of respect for Carty's former line of work, one that requires delayed gratification and painstaking efforts with no end in sight.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - Struggling to boost its ranks, the Army is recruiting a higher number of high school dropouts and recruits who score in the lowest category on military aptitude tests, raising concerns among senior officers and defense analysts that the quality of the force will suffer. Five months into the recruiting year, the percentage of recruits in the active-duty Army without high school diplomas is more than double the percentage of last year. The number of recruits who scored the lowest on the aptitude test has also more than doubled and is the highest since 2001.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 6, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Faced with the toughest recruiting market in memory, the Navy is looking for a lot more sailors like Robert Meyerhoff. Not long ago the high school dropout from Iowa might have been rejected by recruiters. But Meyerhoff's job history, references and score on a military aptitude test earned him a place in the fleet. During the past year, the Navy doubled the number of high school dropouts it accepted -- from 5 percent to 10 percent -- in an effort to meet its recruiting goal.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2004
Yvonne Butler has seen high school dropouts weathered by Baltimore's drug corners progress from being illiterate to joining book clubs, graduating from college and working decent jobs. Yet for every successful student who completes her GED preparation classes at the Learning Bank in West Baltimore, there are hundreds waiting to get in the door. The Learning Bank's waiting list is 700 names long - about as many students as the nonprofit organization teaches in a year. Students wait up to three months to start courses, double the waiting time from two years ago. "It's always a downer when we don't have enough funds for more teachers and tutors," said Butler, who has taught adult-education classes for six years.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2004
Yvonne Butler has seen high school dropouts weathered by Baltimore's drug corners progress from being illiterate to joining book clubs, graduating from college and working decent jobs. Yet for every successful student who completes her GED preparation classes at the Learning Bank in West Baltimore, there are hundreds waiting to get in the door. The Learning Bank's waiting list is 700 names long - about as many students as the nonprofit organization teaches in a year. Students wait up to three months to start courses, double the waiting time from two years ago. "It's always a downer when we don't have enough funds for more teachers and tutors," said Butler, who has taught adult-education classes for six years.
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