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High School Diploma

NEWS
February 4, 2014
The minimum wage is a permanent wage for the undereducated, for whom robots and overseas labor have replaced the unskilled work that once paid a living wage ( "Not so fast on minimum wage," Feb. 1). Moreover, by permitting students to leave school at age 16 without a high school diploma, as 15 percent of students currently do, the state bears significant responsibility for creating this underclass of workers. Even high school graduates who do not proceed to college or acquire a vocational skill in high school are unprepared for work that is much beyond the level of a minimum wage.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2000
Principals, business leaders and education activists from across Maryland urged the state school board yesterday not to abandon plans for high school graduation exams, and their lobbying appeared to succeed. State school board President Edward Andrews -- who a month ago threatened to propose that the board kill the tests in a critical vote scheduled for this morning -- said yesterday that the testimony persuaded him to keep pushing ahead with the core of the state's plan for a rigorous set of tests.
NEWS
February 2, 2003
Schools set meetings for budget process The Carroll County public school system has announced the dates for public meetings regarding the school board's operating budget for the 2003-2004 school year. Meetings will be held as follows: Tuesday: Presentation of the superintendent's proposed budget, 7 p.m. at Oklahoma Road Middle School, 6300 Oklahoma Road, Eldersburg. Feb. 13: Presentation of the proposed budget, 7 p.m. at Shiloh Middle School, 3675 Willow St., Hampstead. Feb. 20: Presentation and adoption of the proposed budget, 7 p.m. at Westminster High School, 1225 Washington Road.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
While Harford County public school students improved their scores in the second year of state high school competency testing, more than half of the nearly 3,000 test-takers still failed the English test, and barely half passed algebra, biology and government. And Superintendent Jacqueline C. Haas says bringing all students up to proficiency is going to be difficult. "We face significant challenges in helping 100 percent - all - our students, regardless of circumstances or disability, to pass the high school assessments," Haas said, adding that she encourages parents to become familiar with the assessment requirements.
NEWS
By Douglas F. Gansler | November 5, 2012
If you believe in the American promise - that hard work leads to opportunity - then you should support the Maryland Dream Act. The American promise rewards us with a real opportunity to build a better future for ourselves and our children - a real shot at the American dream - no matter where we started out in life, provided we apply ourselves and pay our taxes. It is the promise our country makes to us when we make a promise to contribute to our country. Core to that promise is our public education system, which empowers children of all backgrounds to achieve at high levels and graduate ready to compete in the American workforce and give back to the country.
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