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High School Diploma

NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1997
Kristie L. Yingling Storms of Pasadena will graduate from high school tonight having met all of her high school requirements -- including balancing a checkbook, applying for a bank loan, writing out a set of street directions and sending letters to elected officials.Seven years ago, Storms, 23, dropped out of Northeast Senior High School in Pasadena as a freshman. In November, she enrolled in the student-paced Maryland Adult External Diploma Program, which awards a diploma from "Maryland High School" for training in "life skills."
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NEWS
May 2, 2004
Council of PTAs meets tomorrow at board's offices The Carroll County Council of PTAs will meet at 7 p.m. tomorrow at the Board of Education offices, 125 N. Court St., Westminster. An election of officers will be held, and awards for the previous year will be presented. Information: 410-549-6959. Disaster training exercise will be held Saturday An emergency training exercise will be conducted by the Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association, the Sheriff's Department, the Health Department, the Office of Public Safety and the Maryland State Police from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at West Middle School.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1995
Bonnie Kline has a loving husband, a 4-year-old son and a steady job, a nice life by anyone's standards. Only a closely guarded secret marred her happiness -- she was a high school dropout."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
The Kelly sisters have always had spunk. Now they're smart, too.Not that they weren't smart before they went back to high school, but with diplomas on the wall, they're not afraid to give an opinion, offer a suggestion, tell a story.High school has emboldened them."I like the whole world now. It's all mine. I've just got to figure out what to do with it," said Sharon A. Franklin, 47, of Reisterstown, the youngest Kelly sister."I feel confident now," said her sister, Patricia L. Dietz, 49, of Lineboro.
NEWS
By Douglas F. Gansler | November 5, 2012
If you believe in the American promise - that hard work leads to opportunity - then you should support the Maryland Dream Act. The American promise rewards us with a real opportunity to build a better future for ourselves and our children - a real shot at the American dream - no matter where we started out in life, provided we apply ourselves and pay our taxes. It is the promise our country makes to us when we make a promise to contribute to our country. Core to that promise is our public education system, which empowers children of all backgrounds to achieve at high levels and graduate ready to compete in the American workforce and give back to the country.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The journey to a high school diploma for most Maryland students spans four years, 720 days of classes, and a slate of state tests. But for dozens of Baltimore youths, the journey has involved a two-hour trip up Interstate 95, a three-hour exam and a $500 check. Over the past year and a half, the Baltimore City Department of Social Services paid $40,000 of taxpayer money to send youths in foster care to a private Christian school in Philadelphia where they have obtained a high school diploma in one day. Social Services officials defend the program, despite its unusual method of providing diplomas.
NEWS
August 27, 2008
Special-ed students to be held to same test standard 1 The Maryland State Board of Education voted yesterday to make the passing standard for a group of special-education students who take a modified high school test the same as it is for students without disabilities. The decision came after advocates for students with disabilities said those students should be held to the same standards as other students. State statistics showed, however, that only 9 percent or 10 percent of students who took a modified high school assessment last year passed.
NEWS
November 29, 2013
The Maryland Department of Education defines a high school diploma as a 12-year course of study and achievement. Twelve years cannot be shortened, which is why the Baltimore City Department of Social Services had to go to Pennsylvania. There, what you know is more important than how long you sat in a classroom ( "Baltimore foster care youths get diploma in a day in Philadelphia," Nov. 23). I brought this problem to the attention of state officials in the 1980s, when my son scored a 1330 on the SAT at the age of 13. The Baltimore County officials would not allow him to attend college because he hadn't sat for 12 years in a school classroom.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
The minimum wage is a permanent wage for the undereducated, for whom robots and overseas labor have replaced the unskilled work that once paid a living wage ( "Not so fast on minimum wage," Feb. 1). Moreover, by permitting students to leave school at age 16 without a high school diploma, as 15 percent of students currently do, the state bears significant responsibility for creating this underclass of workers. Even high school graduates who do not proceed to college or acquire a vocational skill in high school are unprepared for work that is much beyond the level of a minimum wage.
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