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High School Diploma

NEWS
By Peter Kirsanow | June 11, 2013
The Senate this week begins debate on the proposed immigration reform bill. If this bill becomes law, there is one likely outcome for low-skilled Maryland workers: disaster. The assurances of the bill's proponents that the bill will somehow help the economy obscure copious evidence that it will wreak enormous damage to the employment prospects of American workers who have already seen their wages and employment rates plummet. Indeed, it is no secret that the employment picture for low-skilled workers is abysmal.
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NEWS
By Jo Anne Schneider | October 19, 2011
Unemployment in this recession could have long-term ripple effects because many more of the long-term unemployed are educated, middle age and middle class. Retirement systems will face the consequences of lower contributions and early retirements. Parents are having trouble funding college as they lose income. Those previously with stable credit can't pay mortgages and other obligations. The presence of so many older, educated people among the ranks of the unemployed requires a nuanced policy response.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
Program to tell adults about diploma options Adults ages 16 and older who want to learn about high school diploma options and other programs, and have their math and reading skills evaluated can attend a free "First Steps" orientation. An introductory program will be held from 9 a.m. to noon tomorrow and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. March 9 at Business and Employment Resource Center, 224 N. Center St., Westminster. Information: 410-751-3680, ext. 228. Carroll families to host international students Liberty High School will host 29 international students March 3-6, co-sponsored by the Baltimore/Carroll Chapter of the American Field Service USA. The international students will stay with Carroll families from Thursday night to Sunday.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | October 15, 1993
Dennis Jennings is no longer welcome in Carroll County schools.In what is believed to be only the second time in seven years, the school board is asking a Carroll Circuit judge to bar the 19-year-old permanently from setting foot on any school property for any reason."
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1995
Bonnie Kline has a loving husband, a 4-year-old son and a steady job, a nice life by anyone's standards. Only a closely guarded secret marred her happiness -- she was a high school dropout."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
The Kelly sisters have always had spunk. Now they're smart, too.Not that they weren't smart before they went back to high school, but with diplomas on the wall, they're not afraid to give an opinion, offer a suggestion, tell a story.High school has emboldened them."I like the whole world now. It's all mine. I've just got to figure out what to do with it," said Sharon A. Franklin, 47, of Reisterstown, the youngest Kelly sister."I feel confident now," said her sister, Patricia L. Dietz, 49, of Lineboro.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The journey to a high school diploma for most Maryland students spans four years, 720 days of classes, and a slate of state tests. But for dozens of Baltimore youths, the journey has involved a two-hour trip up Interstate 95, a three-hour exam and a $500 check. Over the past year and a half, the Baltimore City Department of Social Services paid $40,000 of taxpayer money to send youths in foster care to a private Christian school in Philadelphia where they have obtained a high school diploma in one day. Social Services officials defend the program, despite its unusual method of providing diplomas.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2010
The way South Baltimore businessman Jules Edward "Sonny" Morstein Jr., sees it, he owes something to the community in which his family has prospered. "This city has given me a good life," said Morstein, 65. "How can I not give back?" Nearly 25 years ago, several business owners along South Baltimore's Light Street asked one of their own to help renew their shopping district. Morstein, who runs the city's oldest family-owned jewelry store, stepped into the role of president of the Federal Hill Business Association.
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