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High School Diploma

NEWS
August 13, 2014
Soft love doesn't belong in education, but it is often a motivator in allowing our youth to proceed in the system without achieving the required knowledge. Yes, love may be a motivator in allowing a student to "do a project" instead of qualifying, although such compromises also cover up the failure of the system to have the student qualify. "Do a project instead of qualifying" is one of many examples of demand compromise which have spared some young people the hurt of a current failure while dooming them to future pain of inability to cope as adults.
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NEWS
April 14, 2014
Nancy Reigle in her letter, "Is vocational education still a possibility for Maryland?" (April 10), is right on time with her remarks about students being forced to feel they must go to college, presumably to "better themselves. " Not every student is college material. Heaven knows we already have far too many lawyers, doctors, computer "experts," etc. to find work. Furthermore, there is absolutely nothing shabby about being a worker who is "gainfully employed" and making an honest living.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
Program to tell adults about diploma options Adults ages 16 and older who want to learn about high school diploma options and other programs, and have their math and reading skills evaluated can attend a free "First Steps" orientation. An introductory program will be held from 9 a.m. to noon tomorrow and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. March 9 at Business and Employment Resource Center, 224 N. Center St., Westminster. Information: 410-751-3680, ext. 228. Carroll families to host international students Liberty High School will host 29 international students March 3-6, co-sponsored by the Baltimore/Carroll Chapter of the American Field Service USA. The international students will stay with Carroll families from Thursday night to Sunday.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | October 15, 1993
Dennis Jennings is no longer welcome in Carroll County schools.In what is believed to be only the second time in seven years, the school board is asking a Carroll Circuit judge to bar the 19-year-old permanently from setting foot on any school property for any reason."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
Susie Belle Gibson, a Baltimore homemaker who earned her high school diploma at age 61 - and celebrated by dancing at the senior prom - died Saturday of respiratory failure at Good Samaritan Hospital. She was 105. Mrs. Gibson was married for 33 years, raised seven children in an East Madison Street rowhouse and was a widow for more than half a century. She put her children through school, but it bothered her that she had not finished high school. "She went to evening school at Dunbar High School and finally got her high school diploma in 1959.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1995
Bonnie Kline has a loving husband, a 4-year-old son and a steady job, a nice life by anyone's standards. Only a closely guarded secret marred her happiness -- she was a high school dropout."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
The Kelly sisters have always had spunk. Now they're smart, too.Not that they weren't smart before they went back to high school, but with diplomas on the wall, they're not afraid to give an opinion, offer a suggestion, tell a story.High school has emboldened them."I like the whole world now. It's all mine. I've just got to figure out what to do with it," said Sharon A. Franklin, 47, of Reisterstown, the youngest Kelly sister."I feel confident now," said her sister, Patricia L. Dietz, 49, of Lineboro.
NEWS
By Perry L. Weed | March 24, 2014
The Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) employment projections from 2012 through 2022 confirm what Americans already know: The nation is in a structural unemployment crisis, and the outlook is bleak. The U.S. job market has changed radically. Jobs are much harder to get, and better paying jobs require higher education or more advanced technical training. In 2012, workers with a post-secondary education or higher earned a median income of $57,770 - more than twice the $27,670 earned by those with only a high school diploma.
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