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High School Diploma

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NEWS
September 24, 2012
I think we need to require that all children of illegal immigrants take classes in school that will lead them to becoming citizens of the U.S. The Supreme Court requires all states to allow illegal immigrant children to attend public schools. So, why not require them take the classes needed to become citizens of the U.S. as an added certificate to their high school diploma? Then they would be citizens to attend colleges as any other U.S. citizen student. Any student who does not take these classes and not graduate high school would be deported to their home country.
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NEWS
By Dana Stein | September 24, 2014
AmeriCorps, which engages over 75,000 Americans in service projects annually, turned 20 this month. Since the program's inception, over 900,000 AmeriCorps members have contributed over 1 billion hours in service - including 4,000 AmeriCorps members in Baltimore through Civic Works, a non-profit I founded in 1993 to strengthen Baltimore's communities through education, skills development and community service. Too many young people in Baltimore struggle to stay on track in school and build the essential workplace skills needed to gain meaningful employment.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Richard Stem left Westminster High School before graduation to join the military at the start of World War II, and he never returned to pick up his diploma. Now, the 93-year-old is set to become one of the earliest graduates of the class of 2014. On Wednesday, the Carroll County Board of Education will award Stem a high school diploma under a 2000 state law that allows World War II veterans who left for service as seniors in high school before graduation to be awarded diplomas. He will coincidentally receive his diploma the same week he and other current and former military personnel nationwide observe Veterans Day. Carroll County officials said such diplomas do not designate which school the graduate attended and make no mention of the recipient's original graduation year.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 20, 2014
We are headed for a retirement train wreck in this country. Employers continue to shift the burden of post-work income onto the shoulders of their employees, and nobody is saving enough money. But what is more alarming is this: More than a third of Americans have no retirement savings. None. Zero. That includes the kids - almost 70 percent of those 18- to 29-years-olds haven't started saving for retirement. But what is really scary is that a quarter of those 50 to 64 years old - people on the cusp of retirement - haven't put anything away.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
German Garduno led the commencement procession, and his first steps were a bit out of sync. Who could blame him? The last time the 32-year-old Columbia resident from Mexico attended a graduation of any kind was when he completed ninth grade at age 15. Tuesday night, Garduno joined a half-dozen other adults who received high school diplomas via Project Literacy, a Howard County Library educational initiative. Each took steps into uncharted territory that many adults take for granted — including no more worries about being denied a chance at jobs that require at least a high school diploma.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2004
Anne Arundel school officials are considering whether to require four more credits for a high school diploma under a proposal aimed at helping students make the most of the four-period day that high schools began last year. Under a plan that goes before the school board for a first look Wednesday, students would have to complete an additional period of math every other day, as well as a freshman seminar and a personal finance course that would be worth half a credit each. Students also would have to take an additional 1.5 credits of electives and half a credit of physical education, bringing the total needed for graduation to 26 credits.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Baltimore's top cop is adding another obligation to his busy schedule next month: part-time student. Speaking at a ceremony Friday for a group of officers enrolled in a leadership certificate program at the University of Maryland University College, Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III disclosed that he would soon be going back to school himself. Bealefeld has a high school diploma. He dropped out of Anne Arundel Community College to join the police academy after suffering a sports injury that dashed his hopes of earning an athletic scholarship.
NEWS
By Jill Stone and Jill Stone,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Wearing her black and white cap and gown, 53-year-old Margaret Beck walked onto the Westminster High School stage to receive her long-awaited high school diploma, while her proud husband, two children and three grandchildren sat in the audience. Beck, of Hampstead, along with Robert Simpson, 48, of Taneytown, and Jennifer Gustaitis, 23, of Baltimore County, were selected to be the graduation speakers for the 101 adult graduates from the Carroll Adult Learning Connection. "A couple of years ago, I didn't even dream of having my diploma, and now the sky is the limit," Beck said.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
In response to the recent commentary about the challenges facing Baltimore's next schools CEO, "A perpetual hot seat" (June 30), too many young people are graduating from Baltimore City schools at a 3rd or 4th grade reading level. This is a crime and needs to be addressed immediately. I'm thankful that there is a focus on 3rd grade reading now, but we can't just throw away those young people who are older. Drastic intervention is needed. It's hard enough to get a job these days with only a high school diploma.
NEWS
January 24, 2010
Dyslexia Tutoring trains volunteers to tutor low-income children and adults with dyslexia and other language-based disorders. Volunteers should have a high school diploma, good language skills, patience and a willingness to understand persons with language disabilities. Tutors are trained through a 20-hour course in the Orton-Gillingham method of teaching, reading, spelling and writing. Interested persons will also undergo a background check and must commit to 60 hours of tutoring.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
Soft love doesn't belong in education, but it is often a motivator in allowing our youth to proceed in the system without achieving the required knowledge. Yes, love may be a motivator in allowing a student to "do a project" instead of qualifying, although such compromises also cover up the failure of the system to have the student qualify. "Do a project instead of qualifying" is one of many examples of demand compromise which have spared some young people the hurt of a current failure while dooming them to future pain of inability to cope as adults.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
In response to the recent commentary about the challenges facing Baltimore's next schools CEO, "A perpetual hot seat" (June 30), too many young people are graduating from Baltimore City schools at a 3rd or 4th grade reading level. This is a crime and needs to be addressed immediately. I'm thankful that there is a focus on 3rd grade reading now, but we can't just throw away those young people who are older. Drastic intervention is needed. It's hard enough to get a job these days with only a high school diploma.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Nancy Reigle in her letter, "Is vocational education still a possibility for Maryland?" (April 10), is right on time with her remarks about students being forced to feel they must go to college, presumably to "better themselves. " Not every student is college material. Heaven knows we already have far too many lawyers, doctors, computer "experts," etc. to find work. Furthermore, there is absolutely nothing shabby about being a worker who is "gainfully employed" and making an honest living.
NEWS
By Perry L. Weed | March 24, 2014
The Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) employment projections from 2012 through 2022 confirm what Americans already know: The nation is in a structural unemployment crisis, and the outlook is bleak. The U.S. job market has changed radically. Jobs are much harder to get, and better paying jobs require higher education or more advanced technical training. In 2012, workers with a post-secondary education or higher earned a median income of $57,770 - more than twice the $27,670 earned by those with only a high school diploma.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
The minimum wage is a permanent wage for the undereducated, for whom robots and overseas labor have replaced the unskilled work that once paid a living wage ( "Not so fast on minimum wage," Feb. 1). Moreover, by permitting students to leave school at age 16 without a high school diploma, as 15 percent of students currently do, the state bears significant responsibility for creating this underclass of workers. Even high school graduates who do not proceed to college or acquire a vocational skill in high school are unprepared for work that is much beyond the level of a minimum wage.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Maryland's high school graduation rate has been climbing steadily for the past four years and reached nearly 85 percent — far above the national average — this past June, according to data released Tuesday. More students from every corner of the state are staying in school to earn a diploma, but the increases were most pronounced among Hispanic and African-American students. State education officials credited the passage of Maryland's Dream Act, which gave hope to Hispanic students who want to attend college in the state, as one of the factors for the 2.5 percentage point increase in the graduation rate for Hispanics.
BUSINESS
By JULIE CLAIRE DIOP | July 11, 2004
MY BROTHER Michael didn't see the point of reading Shakespeare in high school. Hamlet and Othello were written to be performed on stage, not picked apart in a classroom, he said. During the last semester of his senior year, he dropped out of high school. A few months later, he passed the high school equivalency test and in the roughly 10 years since has climbed steadily up the corporate ladder with a few college courses on his resume but no degree. More than 860,000 people will take the General Educational Development test this year, according to the General Educational Development Service, the branch of the American Council on Education that manages the tests.
NEWS
February 27, 2000
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults to improve reading skills. Among them: Baltimore County Department of Aging, volunteers ages 55 and older to tutor elementary and middle school pupils in reading. Some schools use tutors to work with pupils one on one. In other schools, tutors read aloud to children. The reading effort is part of the department's Retired and Seniors Volunteer Program. Information: 410-887-2059. Calloway Elementary School, 3701 Fernhill Ave., Baltimore, adult volunteers and tutors to work with pupils in grades two through five, from 8: 30 a.m. to 10: 30 a.m. school days.
NEWS
November 29, 2013
The Maryland Department of Education defines a high school diploma as a 12-year course of study and achievement. Twelve years cannot be shortened, which is why the Baltimore City Department of Social Services had to go to Pennsylvania. There, what you know is more important than how long you sat in a classroom ( "Baltimore foster care youths get diploma in a day in Philadelphia," Nov. 23). I brought this problem to the attention of state officials in the 1980s, when my son scored a 1330 on the SAT at the age of 13. The Baltimore County officials would not allow him to attend college because he hadn't sat for 12 years in a school classroom.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The journey to a high school diploma for most Maryland students spans four years, 720 days of classes, and a slate of state tests. But for dozens of Baltimore youths, the journey has involved a two-hour trip up Interstate 95, a three-hour exam and a $500 check. Over the past year and a half, the Baltimore City Department of Social Services paid $40,000 of taxpayer money to send youths in foster care to a private Christian school in Philadelphia where they have obtained a high school diploma in one day. Social Services officials defend the program, despite its unusual method of providing diplomas.
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