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High Noon

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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 4, 2008
The value of one man's taking a stand has never been more thrillingly depicted than in Fred Zinnemann's 1952 High Noon, airing at 6:30 p.m. on TCM. Gary Cooper won his second Best Actor Oscar for playing laconic lawman Will Kane, who starts off the film about to marry the lovely Amy Fowler (Grace Kelly, in one of her first roles) and settle down to a life of Quaker tranquillity, and ends it going up against a pack of bloodthirsty outlaws practically by himself. Cooper, of course, played every one of his characters laconic, a constant in his career that didn't always work.
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NEWS
August 25, 2012
Rose Mayr's former boyfriend, Boris Gamazaychikov, wrote a poem about the young woman, who was killed in a train derailment shortly before midnight Tuesday. "Sometimes I imagined we would grow old together. But now I'll grow old and you'll stay young in my heart forever. And I couldn't ever see you stuck behind a picket fence. You were too busy looking at the sky and the horizon to which it led. "Remember when we climbed to the top of the earth, through the bushes and the thorns we were covered in dirt.
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NEWS
By Eric Trethewey | July 15, 1993
THE YEAR is thick with the season. It's just past the solstice again, the high noon of summer. In these parts, where millennia ago the Earth's surface heaved and folded into hundreds of mountains and hills, the catalpas and mimosas are finally in bloom.Barn swallows that nest in one of the joints under the roof of our porch have returned at least two weeks later than last year and begun to set up housekeeping. Morning and evening, a bob-white who has established residency in the fields around the house repeats indefatigably its two-note repertoire.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 4, 2008
The value of one man's taking a stand has never been more thrillingly depicted than in Fred Zinnemann's 1952 High Noon, airing at 6:30 p.m. on TCM. Gary Cooper won his second Best Actor Oscar for playing laconic lawman Will Kane, who starts off the film about to marry the lovely Amy Fowler (Grace Kelly, in one of her first roles) and settle down to a life of Quaker tranquillity, and ends it going up against a pack of bloodthirsty outlaws practically by himself. Cooper, of course, played every one of his characters laconic, a constant in his career that didn't always work.
NEWS
By Robert H. Chambers | November 26, 1991
WHEN Gary Cooper met "High Noon's" villains in the classic showdown on a dusty main street in the Old West, there was little doubt who would win out.Old "Coop" gunned down the bad guys, tossed his marshal's star in the dust as a sign of contempt at the cowardice of the lily-livered townsfolk who failed to stand up with him against the evil forces, and left on his honeymoon with Grace Kelly. In "High Noon" the good guy won, and his reward was to ride into the sunset with his best girl.This classic shoot-out is now in the process of being re-enacted, but not in the dust of a godforsaken cow town.
NEWS
November 11, 1995
BILL CLINTON and Newt Gingrich just have to go through with it. The speaker just has to send veto-bait fiscal measures to the White House to assuage Republican legislators he has fired up to fever pitch. And the president just has to veto these bills to retain any credibility whatsoever with the Democratic rank and file.If carried to their illogical conclusions, these confrontations would be very bad for the country and wouldn't say much for the politicians involved (add Bob Dole to the list)
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Amid grievances on both sides, President Bush will welcome one of America's most powerful Middle East allies to his Crawford, Texas, ranch today in hopes that discussions in a relaxed setting will bridge a widening rift between the United States and the Arab world. The visit of Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia offers Bush a possible vehicle for seeking an end to the 19-month guerrilla war between Israelis and Palestinians. Bush has praised a peace proposal by Prince Abdullah, adopted last month by the Arab League, that offers Israel normal relations with the Arab world in return for a full withdrawal from land that the Jewish state occupied during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. But today's meeting comes against the backdrop of widespread Arab anger over U.S. support for Israel and mounting resentment in the United States over a failure by Arab leaders to condemn and combat terrorism against Israelis.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2000
There isn't a thing about TBS' remake of "High Noon" that isn't as good or better in the 1952 original. Well, the filmmakers do avoid a reprise of one of Hollywood's more celebrated gaffes: In the original final scene, when Marshal Will Kane (Gary Cooper) disgustedly throws his badge to the ground, the camera distinctly shows two badges lying there. But it's hard to imagine anyone spending millions of dollars and devoting two hours of prime-time to rectifying that single mistake. Wondering how many pieces of tin would be on the ground at least provided an excuse to see "High Noon" 2000 through to the end. Not that there's anything torturously wrong with the film.
NEWS
August 25, 2012
Rose Mayr's former boyfriend, Boris Gamazaychikov, wrote a poem about the young woman, who was killed in a train derailment shortly before midnight Tuesday. "Sometimes I imagined we would grow old together. But now I'll grow old and you'll stay young in my heart forever. And I couldn't ever see you stuck behind a picket fence. You were too busy looking at the sky and the horizon to which it led. "Remember when we climbed to the top of the earth, through the bushes and the thorns we were covered in dirt.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY | September 6, 1998
Sunday night is a school night, but it's worth staying up tonight to catch two classic Westerns on the TCM channel.At 8 p.m. it's my favorite John Ford movie, "The Searchers" (1956), a sprawling, vividly colored epic starring John Wayne as a man obsessed with finding his niece (Natalie Wood), who has been kidnapped by Indians. Whereas many of Ford's Westerns bore more than a whiff of racism, "The Searchers" - which you should really see on a big screen if possible - betokens a slightly more reflective attitude on the part of the director, who depicts BTC Wayne's character as more deranged than heroic.
NEWS
September 19, 2003
Sheb Wooley, 82, who menaced Gary Cooper in High Noon, played the trail scout on TV's Rawhide and scored one of the biggest novelty recording hits of the 1950s with "The Purple People Eater," died Tuesday in Nashville, Tenn. He had leukemia for five years. In a career that spanned seven decades and ranged from Nashville to Hollywood, Mr. Wooley was known as a character actor, songwriter, recording artist and comedian. He appeared in more than 60 movies, many of them westerns, including The Outlaw Josey Wales, The War Wagon, Distant Drums and the classic High Noon.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Amid grievances on both sides, President Bush will welcome one of America's most powerful Middle East allies to his Crawford, Texas, ranch today in hopes that discussions in a relaxed setting will bridge a widening rift between the United States and the Arab world. The visit of Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia offers Bush a possible vehicle for seeking an end to the 19-month guerrilla war between Israelis and Palestinians. Bush has praised a peace proposal by Prince Abdullah, adopted last month by the Arab League, that offers Israel normal relations with the Arab world in return for a full withdrawal from land that the Jewish state occupied during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. But today's meeting comes against the backdrop of widespread Arab anger over U.S. support for Israel and mounting resentment in the United States over a failure by Arab leaders to condemn and combat terrorism against Israelis.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2000
There isn't a thing about TBS' remake of "High Noon" that isn't as good or better in the 1952 original. Well, the filmmakers do avoid a reprise of one of Hollywood's more celebrated gaffes: In the original final scene, when Marshal Will Kane (Gary Cooper) disgustedly throws his badge to the ground, the camera distinctly shows two badges lying there. But it's hard to imagine anyone spending millions of dollars and devoting two hours of prime-time to rectifying that single mistake. Wondering how many pieces of tin would be on the ground at least provided an excuse to see "High Noon" 2000 through to the end. Not that there's anything torturously wrong with the film.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY | September 6, 1998
Sunday night is a school night, but it's worth staying up tonight to catch two classic Westerns on the TCM channel.At 8 p.m. it's my favorite John Ford movie, "The Searchers" (1956), a sprawling, vividly colored epic starring John Wayne as a man obsessed with finding his niece (Natalie Wood), who has been kidnapped by Indians. Whereas many of Ford's Westerns bore more than a whiff of racism, "The Searchers" - which you should really see on a big screen if possible - betokens a slightly more reflective attitude on the part of the director, who depicts BTC Wayne's character as more deranged than heroic.
NEWS
November 11, 1995
BILL CLINTON and Newt Gingrich just have to go through with it. The speaker just has to send veto-bait fiscal measures to the White House to assuage Republican legislators he has fired up to fever pitch. And the president just has to veto these bills to retain any credibility whatsoever with the Democratic rank and file.If carried to their illogical conclusions, these confrontations would be very bad for the country and wouldn't say much for the politicians involved (add Bob Dole to the list)
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | October 21, 1994
The TV Repairman:The Bassett Hound, Dan Dierdorf, and his buddies, Al Michaels and Frank Gifford, had a sensational night calling the Broncos-Chiefs game on "Monday Night Football." Dan lost his opening monologue to technical difficulties, a plus, but proved the lead guy in discussing targets of opportunity, not always football-related. After 25 years and about 400 games, even the most ardent NFL fan doesn't insist upon knowing if the defensive team is in a double zone.The trio discussed the length of the tail of the horse galloping around Mile High Stadium, the old TV dummy Jerry Mahoney ("I knew him when he was a kid," said elder statesman Gifford)
NEWS
September 19, 2003
Sheb Wooley, 82, who menaced Gary Cooper in High Noon, played the trail scout on TV's Rawhide and scored one of the biggest novelty recording hits of the 1950s with "The Purple People Eater," died Tuesday in Nashville, Tenn. He had leukemia for five years. In a career that spanned seven decades and ranged from Nashville to Hollywood, Mr. Wooley was known as a character actor, songwriter, recording artist and comedian. He appeared in more than 60 movies, many of them westerns, including The Outlaw Josey Wales, The War Wagon, Distant Drums and the classic High Noon.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | October 21, 1994
The TV Repairman:The Bassett Hound, Dan Dierdorf, and his buddies, Al Michaels and Frank Gifford, had a sensational night calling the Broncos-Chiefs game on "Monday Night Football." Dan lost his opening monologue to technical difficulties, a plus, but proved the lead guy in discussing targets of opportunity, not always football-related. After 25 years and about 400 games, even the most ardent NFL fan doesn't insist upon knowing if the defensive team is in a double zone.The trio discussed the length of the tail of the horse galloping around Mile High Stadium, the old TV dummy Jerry Mahoney ("I knew him when he was a kid," said elder statesman Gifford)
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,STAFF GRAPHICTelevision Critic | September 24, 1993
Cable companies and Baltimore-area network television stations have stepped up talks about what local cable subscribers will see when they turn on their TV sets in two weeks. Proposals include everything from new cable channels for the owners of local stations to sharing some business costs.Baltimore's situation is among the worst in the country for programming agreements between the four major network stations -- ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox -- and cable companies, according to the National Association of Broadcasters.
NEWS
By Eric Trethewey | July 15, 1993
THE YEAR is thick with the season. It's just past the solstice again, the high noon of summer. In these parts, where millennia ago the Earth's surface heaved and folded into hundreds of mountains and hills, the catalpas and mimosas are finally in bloom.Barn swallows that nest in one of the joints under the roof of our porch have returned at least two weeks later than last year and begun to set up housekeeping. Morning and evening, a bob-white who has established residency in the fields around the house repeats indefatigably its two-note repertoire.
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