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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Until the bank called that day in 1995, Kurt Jakobson figured Igor Fyodorov was just talking big.A former Environmental Protection Agency engineer who ran a tax-preparation business from his Pikesville home, Jakobson had helped the Russian immigrant with the intricacies of American taxes and corporate charters. He dismissed as so much hot air Fyodorov's assurances that lucrative deals were just around the corner.Then Jakobson's Ellicott City bank phoned."They said, '$2 million just arrived in your account,' " Jakobson recalls.
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NEWS
September 27, 2014
Reporter Jonathan Pitts ' article "New heights for High Holidays" (Sept. 24), lacked something quite basic, which is that synagogues require funding to operate. We can't all have the luxury of a large endowment, as in the case of Chabad, to operate year after year relying on small donations that come in from unaffiliated, Reform, Conservative and Orthodox Jews alike. I also find it odd that the article mentions the high cost of ticket prices and memberships at other synagogues but doesn't list any of the costs associated with them or, for that matter, with Rabbi Greenspoon's services.
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NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Greg Schneider and Bill Atkinson and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
Tomorrow morning, Buzzy Krongard disappears."Take good notes, 'cause this is the last interview I'm ever gonna give," the 61-year-old investment banker said last week, reclining in an easy chair, Cuban cigar pointed straight at the ceiling.The Baltimore native has walked away from a lucrative job as vice chairman of Bankers Trust New York Corp., the parent of BT Alex. Brown Inc. and the seventh-largest bank in the country.At an age when most executives contemplate retirement, Krongard is headed into the darkness, trading the cordial world of high finance for the intrigue of the Central Intelligence Agency.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | March 8, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - If you want another indication of how the landscape has changed over the past month at the Ed Smith Stadium complex, consider the Orioles' Grapefruit League game against the Red Sox on Saturday afternoon. It was just another exhibition game, or so it seemed. The Orioles play 30 of them and - for the most part - they don't generate a whole lot of buzz, unless a marquee player gets hurt or something really strange makes its way onto the SportsCenter rail. Neither of those things happened on Saturday, but it was an afternoon on high alert after news started to trickle out that free-agent pitcher Ervin Santana had reduced his contract demands and was about to choose his new team from a very short list that included the Orioles.
NEWS
February 18, 1996
Since the preposterous plot is not meant to be taken seriously, even by the characters who struggle in its contradictory meshes, Safire concentrates his considerable energies on stuffing their mouths with knowing references to journalism, publishing, high finance, the CIA and KGB ... One hinge of his plot involves the workings of presidential covert-action findings, no very mysterious process, but one that Safire is determined to get wrong ... His ignorance...
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | April 18, 2000
IT AIN'T WALL Street in New York, it's just 36th Street in Hampden. The stock market has its myocardial infarction Friday, causing brilliant economists to announce the end of the world as we know it -- but, in some venues, a certain obliviousness prevails. "The stock market?" Nancy Rock asks yesterday morning. She is a waitress at the famous Cafe Hon. Glancing out at rain falling from a grimy sky, she asks a guy if he can run down to the bank and get some change for the cash register. "What do you need?"
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 15, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Now that New York City Public Advocate Mark Green has won the Democratic mayoral primary, New Yorkers will have a choice of two kinds of experience -- Mr. Green's in government and Republican nominee Michael Bloomberg's in business and high finance -- in deciding which of them should take over the city's recovery and rebuilding task. Republican Mayor Rudy Giuliani is barred by law from a third term. His efforts to have the limit changed or get a three-month extension of his term to stay on the cleanup job muddied the Democratic primary runoff that Mr. Green finally won Thursday over Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | March 8, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - If you want another indication of how the landscape has changed over the past month at the Ed Smith Stadium complex, consider the Orioles' Grapefruit League game against the Red Sox on Saturday afternoon. It was just another exhibition game, or so it seemed. The Orioles play 30 of them and - for the most part - they don't generate a whole lot of buzz, unless a marquee player gets hurt or something really strange makes its way onto the SportsCenter rail. Neither of those things happened on Saturday, but it was an afternoon on high alert after news started to trickle out that free-agent pitcher Ervin Santana had reduced his contract demands and was about to choose his new team from a very short list that included the Orioles.
BUSINESS
By James Russell and James Russell,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 26, 1994
If any good emerges from the financial fiasco in Orange County, Calif., it may be heightened public awareness of the dangers of excessive debt.Debt is an essential ingredient in modern life, from purchases of homes and automobiles to the use of credit cards for buying now and paying later. But the misuse of debt can be a recipe for agony at best and disaster at worst.The principle applies in the area of investing, whether it is followed by a multibillion-dollar institution, such as Orange County, or an individual stretching for a little better return on his or her money.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - HBO's new pseudo-reality series K Street offers an amusing and entertaining peek inside the world of Washington power. But its view inside the curtain that shrouds the real K Street is about as close to reality as M*A*S*H was to a real war zone. As a journalist who works in and around the real K Street - a stark boulevard that is to the world of power-brokering and influence-peddling what Wall Street is to high finance - I'm delighted to see Hollywood take it seriously enough to make a series about it. But after watching the first episode Sunday, I wonder whether co-producers Steven Soderbergh, the Oscar-winning director of Traffic, and actor George Clooney will be serious enough to show the deal-making, back-scratching, log-rolling and brow-beating that goes on in K Street's real world.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 20, 2011
It's a shame the Louisiana legislature passed, and Gov. Bobby Jindal signed, the 2008 Louisiana Science Education Act. Not only does the act make it more likely that Louisiana teachers will suggest that evolution and global warming are fake. A side effect of such bills is to set Maryland school officials dead against the idea of mandating a high-school course in personal finance. The General Assembly is considering making personal finance a requirement for graduation. Two years after incompetent consumers teamed up with predatory bankers to cause the worst economic slump in 80 years, this is a great idea.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | October 21, 2007
I can proudly state that I now know a considerable amount about the savings and loan industry in Baltimore. "Please," I can hear you readers fervently praying, "let us in on some of the complex issues facing the finance industry today. And then wake us up!" For the past six months or so, I have been writing the 100-year history of a truly unique savings and loan association in Baltimore, Eladesor Laredef; its name has naturally been spelled backwards for privacy protection. But I am not going to tell you much about this venerable institution, because that would spoil the book.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - HBO's new pseudo-reality series K Street offers an amusing and entertaining peek inside the world of Washington power. But its view inside the curtain that shrouds the real K Street is about as close to reality as M*A*S*H was to a real war zone. As a journalist who works in and around the real K Street - a stark boulevard that is to the world of power-brokering and influence-peddling what Wall Street is to high finance - I'm delighted to see Hollywood take it seriously enough to make a series about it. But after watching the first episode Sunday, I wonder whether co-producers Steven Soderbergh, the Oscar-winning director of Traffic, and actor George Clooney will be serious enough to show the deal-making, back-scratching, log-rolling and brow-beating that goes on in K Street's real world.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 15, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Now that New York City Public Advocate Mark Green has won the Democratic mayoral primary, New Yorkers will have a choice of two kinds of experience -- Mr. Green's in government and Republican nominee Michael Bloomberg's in business and high finance -- in deciding which of them should take over the city's recovery and rebuilding task. Republican Mayor Rudy Giuliani is barred by law from a third term. His efforts to have the limit changed or get a three-month extension of his term to stay on the cleanup job muddied the Democratic primary runoff that Mr. Green finally won Thursday over Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
George M. Davis was gathering with family for Fourth of July festivities last year when his long-time friend and co-worker David S. Oros called to key him in on a plan he'd been mulling for weeks. He wanted to take the young wireless communications company he'd started, Aether Systems Inc., public. And, Oros wanted it done with due haste - before Christmas. A few weeks later, Wall Street financiers assembled by the hard-charging Oros were aghast. "They all shook their heads and said it just couldn't be done," recalls Davis, now president of Aether.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | April 18, 2000
IT AIN'T WALL Street in New York, it's just 36th Street in Hampden. The stock market has its myocardial infarction Friday, causing brilliant economists to announce the end of the world as we know it -- but, in some venues, a certain obliviousness prevails. "The stock market?" Nancy Rock asks yesterday morning. She is a waitress at the famous Cafe Hon. Glancing out at rain falling from a grimy sky, she asks a guy if he can run down to the bank and get some change for the cash register. "What do you need?"
NEWS
September 27, 2014
Reporter Jonathan Pitts ' article "New heights for High Holidays" (Sept. 24), lacked something quite basic, which is that synagogues require funding to operate. We can't all have the luxury of a large endowment, as in the case of Chabad, to operate year after year relying on small donations that come in from unaffiliated, Reform, Conservative and Orthodox Jews alike. I also find it odd that the article mentions the high cost of ticket prices and memberships at other synagogues but doesn't list any of the costs associated with them or, for that matter, with Rabbi Greenspoon's services.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 20, 2011
It's a shame the Louisiana legislature passed, and Gov. Bobby Jindal signed, the 2008 Louisiana Science Education Act. Not only does the act make it more likely that Louisiana teachers will suggest that evolution and global warming are fake. A side effect of such bills is to set Maryland school officials dead against the idea of mandating a high-school course in personal finance. The General Assembly is considering making personal finance a requirement for graduation. Two years after incompetent consumers teamed up with predatory bankers to cause the worst economic slump in 80 years, this is a great idea.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
Think of Baltimore's financial nerve center, and many picture the gleaming skyscrapers downtown, where Legg Mason Inc., Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown Inc., T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. and Mercantile Bankshares Corp. call home.But about a mile north of the Inner Harbor is another cluster of companies that are also involved in high finance. They are tucked away in a grittier, more eclectic part of the city -- Mount Vernon.Best known for its quaint shops, restaurants, tree-lined streets, and even occasional gunbattle, Mount Vernon has become the city's other hub to a growing number of money managers who collectively oversee $10.4 billion in assets.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Greg Schneider and Bill Atkinson and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
Tomorrow morning, Buzzy Krongard disappears."Take good notes, 'cause this is the last interview I'm ever gonna give," the 61-year-old investment banker said last week, reclining in an easy chair, Cuban cigar pointed straight at the ceiling.The Baltimore native has walked away from a lucrative job as vice chairman of Bankers Trust New York Corp., the parent of BT Alex. Brown Inc. and the seventh-largest bank in the country.At an age when most executives contemplate retirement, Krongard is headed into the darkness, trading the cordial world of high finance for the intrigue of the Central Intelligence Agency.
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