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High Definition Television

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By New York Times News Service | May 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The three top rivals for the right to develop the next generation of television technology in the United States agreed yesterday to join forces on a single approach, hastening the biggest change in broadcasting since the advent of color in the 1960s.The agreement to collaborate on high-definition television, a move strongly supported by top federal officials, eliminates the likelihood of protracted disputes and litigation, which could have delayed the introduction of the technology for years.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
The television is being revolutionized. Last year, consumers saw high-definition digital TV become the standard in homes across the nation. And now 3-D TVs are for sale. The next step may be a moving television set. A coalition of broadcasters and other companies are putting the finishing touches on new technology that would bring digital television directly to cell phones, laptops and gadgets embedded in automobiles. The mobile devices would receive TV signals, not Internet video you can watch now. The new technology is being tested in the Washington-Baltimore area and in several other regions across the country.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 13, 1993
VIENNA, Va. -- A special committee advising the Federal Communications Commission concluded Thursday evening that all five of the systems competing to be picked as the U.S. high-definition television standard were flawed.All of the competitors told the committee that they had made improvements to repair the problems that turned up in tests last year. So committee members said they would recommend that four of the five systems be retested to gauge those improvements. That could set back the schedule for the introduction of high-definition television by as much as a year.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2008
They arrive as individuals, impeccable in matching blue uniform tops, steaming styrofoam coffee cups in hand. They gather in a semicircle, bright eyes fixed on their field general, awaiting his direction. They've blended into a team. On an early morning four days before Super Bowl XLII, on a street of red-brick ranch homes in Baltimore County's Nottingham neighborhood, the six key players of Direct Audio & Video huddle for their version of a game-winning drive before screaming throngs.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider | March 16, 1997
GET THOSE wallets open, because high-definition television (HDTV) is on the way. And sooner than you might think.With its promise of super-clear pictures, CD-quality audio and computer-like capabilities, HDTV will deliver the precision of digital technology. The catch: It comes with a huge price tag for both consumers and broadcasters.The broadcast industry has been preparing to convert to digital HDTV on about a 15-year time line. Soon all stations will be required to stage two broadcasts -- one for traditional, or analog, TV and another for HDTV.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
The television is being revolutionized. Last year, consumers saw high-definition digital TV become the standard in homes across the nation. And now 3-D TVs are for sale. The next step may be a moving television set. A coalition of broadcasters and other companies are putting the finishing touches on new technology that would bring digital television directly to cell phones, laptops and gadgets embedded in automobiles. The mobile devices would receive TV signals, not Internet video you can watch now. The new technology is being tested in the Washington-Baltimore area and in several other regions across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2001
High Definition Television has a rocky path ahead of it before becoming a permanent fixture in the American living room, but you've got to give it some credit. It simply looks spectacular. Legislators, broadcasters, and budget-conscious consumers occasionally are blocking the road to HDTV's success, and many of them have legitimate concerns. Many television stations, for instance, feel the time isn't right for broadcast of HDTV signals because only a tiny percentage of American families have plopped down $3,000 or more for an HDTV system.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | April 5, 1997
WHEN LOOKING for proof that our household is presided over by a dad who is a dinosaur in a digital age, my kids point to our television antenna.Nobody has a TV antenna anymore, they tell me. Everybody gets their television signal on cable.Imagine the feeling of smugness that came over me yesterday as I read newspaper stories saying that people with antennas could be the first in the nation to experience the joy of watching digital, high-definition television.I was not entirely sure what kind of joy digital, high-definition television offered.
NEWS
December 28, 1991
Close on the heels of the Japanese introduction of regular high-definition television broadcasting, a group of American engineers has demonstrated a superior system. The General Instruments Corp. team, led by Korean-born MIT graduate Woo Paik, has delivered the first installment on a system promised a year ago, just as many observers were writing off American hopes of catching up in the race to develop the television system for the next century.To be sure, there is much still to be done. General Instruments, a maker of cable TV and satellite transmission equipment trying to protect its customer base, has not yet brought out a marketable product.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jerri Stroud and Jerri Stroud,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 15, 2004
High-definition television used to be only for the wealthy - or the particular - TV viewer. No longer. HDTV sets are selling for as little as $550 for a 27-inch model or about $1,500 for the lowest-priced big-screen model, an informal check of retailers showed. Some high-end models cost $9,000 to $15,000 each. And HD programming, once a rarity, is available from cable, satellite and broadcast sources. "It's coming into the family rooms and the great rooms," said Tony Vieira, general manager of the Sound Room in Chesterfield, Mo., which specializes in high-end audio and video equipment.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 8, 2005
After years of fighting it, I got wired this week to the modern world. I climbed up on the roof and watched a guy attach a satellite dish to the chimney. As I watched the installer point the dish toward a satellite in the distant southwestern sky, it struck me that this device was not only going to play a role in how we spend our weekends, it also represented a seismic shift in household philosophy. For a quarter of a century, ours was a low-tech television home. If a program couldn't be pulled in by our rooftop antenna, we didn't see it. I resisted cable, or any form of pay television.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 25, 2005
OVER THE years, I've been an early reviewer of new technology but rarely an early adopter. Unless a new gadget promises a quantum leap in performance - or does something that was impossible before - I'm unlikely to be in the first wave to hit the beach. I've saved a lot of money and grief that way. Eventually, though, a new technology becomes good enough, or affordable enough, to make the leap into our personal lives. High-definition TV is getting there - in fact, it reached our house two weeks ago, and made its HD debut on Monday.
SPORTS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
In a last-minute deal, Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said late yesterday that it has agreed in principle with Comcast Corp. to a deal that will enable cable subscribers in Baltimore City and County to watch tomorrow's Super Bowl in vivid, precise, high-definition television. Until last night's agreement, football fans faced the prospect that a fee dispute could cause Fox Baltimore affiliate WBFF/Channel 45 to withhold the high-definition version of its Super Bowl signal from Comcast's cable system.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jerri Stroud and Jerri Stroud,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 15, 2004
High-definition television used to be only for the wealthy - or the particular - TV viewer. No longer. HDTV sets are selling for as little as $550 for a 27-inch model or about $1,500 for the lowest-priced big-screen model, an informal check of retailers showed. Some high-end models cost $9,000 to $15,000 each. And HD programming, once a rarity, is available from cable, satellite and broadcast sources. "It's coming into the family rooms and the great rooms," said Tony Vieira, general manager of the Sound Room in Chesterfield, Mo., which specializes in high-end audio and video equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Crayton Harrison and Crayton Harrison,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 10, 2004
Next time your neighbor starts bragging about his snazzy high-definition plasma screen television, just smile to yourself. If he's like most HDTV set owners, he doesn't really have high-definition programming. Chances are, he's paid a lot of money to watch the same old picture blown up bigger. Fewer than one in four HDTV set owners subscribe to cable or satellite channels that broadcast in crisper, clearer high definition. Less than 2 percent of television-owning households - about 2 million homes - subscribe to HDTV programming, though nearly 9 percent own an HDTV-ready set. About 1.2 million households have digital tuners to get the signals over the airwaves.
NEWS
By Linda Shrieves and Linda Shrieves,THE ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 14, 2004
Oscar night wowed Americans as the stars paraded down the red carpet in low-cut gowns, shimmering jewels and perfectly coifed hair. But a small minority of TV viewers got a glimpse of the other side of Hollywood. Those watching the Oscar telecast in high-definition television spotted Renee Zellweger's blotchy red marks underneath her makeup. They examined Jamie Lee Curtis' crow's-feet. And they marveled at Michael Douglas, who looked positively ancient next to his glamorous wife, Catherine Zeta-Jones.
NEWS
December 30, 1990
The race to perfect a new, high-definition television system, all but ceded to the Japanese and Europeans, is wide open again. Guess who broke into the front ranks? Americans. The people conventional wisdom keeps consigning to the back bench in the technology wars to define economic competitiveness for the 21st century.Japanese industrialists, confident of their consumer electronics dominance, rushed to develop high-definition television, or HDTV. Their version, now in early market tests, uses receivers costing as much as automobiles, but that's likely to change quickly -- as soon as TV producers begin taking advantage of HDTV's vastly improved picture quality.
SPORTS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
In a last-minute deal, Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said late yesterday that it has agreed in principle with Comcast Corp. to a deal that will enable cable subscribers in Baltimore City and County to watch tomorrow's Super Bowl in vivid, precise, high-definition television. Until last night's agreement, football fans faced the prospect that a fee dispute could cause Fox Baltimore affiliate WBFF/Channel 45 to withhold the high-definition version of its Super Bowl signal from Comcast's cable system.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 5, 2004
FOR MOST consumers, high-definition television has produced only high anxiety. Entering this year, price tags on basic large-format home theater monitors are hovering at $3,000 or more, and prospects for owning that stunning plasma, LCD or DLP screen might seem as dim as the picture on that old black-and-white. Chin up, videophiles. At last month's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, signs emerged that prices will slide rapidly by year's end. Competition has kicked up as Dell, Gateway and other computer companies turn their attention to digital displays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
A new cable box is in town, but you'll need a high-definition television to enjoy its benefits. Comcast Cable began offering high-definition digital television signals Tuesday in a small, but significant step toward the future of television. Customers in Baltimore, Howard and Harford counties with HDTVs can receive the signals once they get a new set-top box with a high-definition digital tuner, said Tom Williams, Comcast's director of technology for Baltimore metro counties. Anne Arundel customers will get the service this month.
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