Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHigh Culture
IN THE NEWS

High Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | September 19, 1994
Washington -- THE GREAT Depression was under way and Franklin Roosevelt was president. So a federal make-work agency called the Works Progress Administration came to the rescue of thousands of idle talented musicians by funding a score of symphony orchestras in cities throughout the land.One of the best of them was the Buffalo Philharmonic. Soon, however, the Philharmonic may be playing a final funeral dirge for itself. In recent years, federal, state and city subsidies have dried up, leaving the county government as its sole sugar daddy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | March 26, 2012
News Roundup   •••• "Angry Birds Space" did more than 10 million downloads in under three days. In my professional opinion, that's a lot of flippin' downloads. [ @ AngryBirds ] •••• Some simultaneous details about the Wii U and “Assassin's Creed III” have been revealed. With so much synergy being promoted between titles like “AC3” and “Ninja Gaiden III” and Nintendo's new console it seems that the image of “kids and families only” might be one Nintendo is looking to shed.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
''We're starting to wonder whether anybody really wants to read criticism anymore," the culture editor of a well-known magazine recently told me. Time was when I would have been shocked by such a statement -- but times and tastes are changing, and editors are taking note. For years, American magazines and newspapers have been slowly cutting back on review space and running more personality-driven features instead; Talk, Tina Brown's new magazine, publishes no criticism of any kind, save for an occasional book review.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 2003
MOSCOW - Mikhail Y. Shvydkoi, Russia's minister of culture, is entrusted with keeping the flame of Russia's high culture flickering during these turbulent times. The 62-year-old theater scholar is responsible for his nation's most prominent arts institutions, including the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow and the Hermitage Museum and the Russian State Museum in St. Petersburg. He has been named by Art Review magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the art world. Shvydkoi was invited to visit Baltimore for the Vivat!
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 2003
MOSCOW - Mikhail Y. Shvydkoi, Russia's minister of culture, is entrusted with keeping the flame of Russia's high culture flickering during these turbulent times. The 62-year-old theater scholar is responsible for his nation's most prominent arts institutions, including the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow and the Hermitage Museum and the Russian State Museum in St. Petersburg. He has been named by Art Review magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the art world. Shvydkoi was invited to visit Baltimore for the Vivat!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | March 26, 2012
News Roundup   •••• "Angry Birds Space" did more than 10 million downloads in under three days. In my professional opinion, that's a lot of flippin' downloads. [ @ AngryBirds ] •••• Some simultaneous details about the Wii U and “Assassin's Creed III” have been revealed. With so much synergy being promoted between titles like “AC3” and “Ninja Gaiden III” and Nintendo's new console it seems that the image of “kids and families only” might be one Nintendo is looking to shed.
NEWS
By Henry Louis Gates Jr | May 15, 1991
I RECENTLY asked the dean of a prestigious liberal arts college if his school would ever have, as Berkeley has, a 70 percent non-white enrollment."Never," he replied. "That would completely alter our identity as a center of the liberal arts."The assumption that there is a deep connection between the shape of a college's curriculum and the ethnic composition of its students reflects a disquieting trend in education.Political representation has been confused with the "representation" of various ethnic identities in the curriculum.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa | December 10, 1990
HIS TWO NIECES persuaded John P. Kennedy to attend a ballet. It wasn't just any ballet. It was one performed by the pupils of Monsieur A. H. Durocher, the most fashionable dancing master in Baltimore. Durocher was a French refugee from Santo Domingo. He arrived here in 1824, and within a few years was one of dominant figures in the world of belle artes.Kennedy remembered little about the music or the performance of the "Ballet of Telemachus" on that artistic adventure in 1827. PeterKumpaIt was the audience that enthralled him."
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
When some look at Columbia's Wilde Lake High School, they see a nurturing environment for creativity; others see a permissive atmosphere that has spawned discipline problems and low academic test scores.What you see probably determines how you feel about Principal Roger Plunkett, whose actions in his first year at Wilde Lake have divided the high school community. By all accounts the campus that once embodied Columbia's free-thinking tradition is the midst of a cultural shift -- changes that reflect those in the 31-year-old planned community.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | May 19, 1996
A SEA CHANGE of taste is occurring in the performing arts, one that threatens the future of highbrow culture in America in ways that would have seemed inconceivable only a generation ago.That dire forecast is contained in a report released last week by the National Endowment for the Arts. The NEA study suggested that unless arts groups find new ways to lure younger people to live performances of classical music, opera and musical theater, the audience for these art forms may simply evaporate once the World War II generation, now in its 50s and 60s, fades from the scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
''We're starting to wonder whether anybody really wants to read criticism anymore," the culture editor of a well-known magazine recently told me. Time was when I would have been shocked by such a statement -- but times and tastes are changing, and editors are taking note. For years, American magazines and newspapers have been slowly cutting back on review space and running more personality-driven features instead; Talk, Tina Brown's new magazine, publishes no criticism of any kind, save for an occasional book review.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
When some look at Columbia's Wilde Lake High School, they see a nurturing environment for creativity; others see a permissive atmosphere that has spawned discipline problems and low academic test scores.What you see probably determines how you feel about Principal Roger Plunkett, whose actions in his first year at Wilde Lake have divided the high school community. By all accounts the campus that once embodied Columbia's free-thinking tradition is the midst of a cultural shift -- changes that reflect those in the 31-year-old planned community.
NEWS
By Andrew J. Glass | September 19, 1994
Washington -- THE GREAT Depression was under way and Franklin Roosevelt was president. So a federal make-work agency called the Works Progress Administration came to the rescue of thousands of idle talented musicians by funding a score of symphony orchestras in cities throughout the land.One of the best of them was the Buffalo Philharmonic. Soon, however, the Philharmonic may be playing a final funeral dirge for itself. In recent years, federal, state and city subsidies have dried up, leaving the county government as its sole sugar daddy.
NEWS
By Henry Louis Gates Jr | May 15, 1991
I RECENTLY asked the dean of a prestigious liberal arts college if his school would ever have, as Berkeley has, a 70 percent non-white enrollment."Never," he replied. "That would completely alter our identity as a center of the liberal arts."The assumption that there is a deep connection between the shape of a college's curriculum and the ethnic composition of its students reflects a disquieting trend in education.Political representation has been confused with the "representation" of various ethnic identities in the curriculum.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa | December 10, 1990
HIS TWO NIECES persuaded John P. Kennedy to attend a ballet. It wasn't just any ballet. It was one performed by the pupils of Monsieur A. H. Durocher, the most fashionable dancing master in Baltimore. Durocher was a French refugee from Santo Domingo. He arrived here in 1824, and within a few years was one of dominant figures in the world of belle artes.Kennedy remembered little about the music or the performance of the "Ballet of Telemachus" on that artistic adventure in 1827. PeterKumpaIt was the audience that enthralled him."
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | November 19, 1995
Baltimore Museum of Art officials were thrilled last week to win a $1.18 million grant from the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund. The money is to be used to increase the museum's efforts to reach out to urban families, particularly African-American residents of Baltimore's federal empowerment zones.One wonders, though, just what the museum proposes to offer the city's troubled inner-city youth that presumably will draw them through its doors in significant numbers.Yes, there are plans for an "art shuttle" to transport neighborhood kids to the museum, and to offer workshops for parents and grandparents to create art with their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | October 28, 2004
Rashee release party Baltimore baby-faced R&B singer Rashee (Trisha McIntosh) will croon tonight at the release party for her second record, Out of Control. The party is at 5 Seasons Lounge. Also billed are rappers Domdadaz and reggae artist Krome. Tickets cost $10. The music goes 8 p.m.-midnight. 5 Seasons Lounge is at 830 Guilford Ave. Call 410-659-2100. Mike Watt at Ottobar Ex-Minute Man Mike Watt plays at the Ottobar Saturday. The bassist (and cat lover) is promoting his new record, The Secondman's Middle Stand.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.