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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
For years, doctors have turned the conventional wisdom about the dangers of high cholesterol on its head when it comes to the many thousands of people on dialysis. Despite the general acknowledgement that high cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease and strokes, data have suggested that dialysis patients with high cholesterol have lower death rates than others with supposedly "healthy" blood-lipid levels -- prompting many physicians to refrain from treating dialysis patients with drugs such as statins that can bring cholesterol down.
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NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | November 23, 2009
Question: : Do you know about the "wet pajama" treatment for childhood eczema? Wet a pair of cotton pajamas and wring them out. Put them on the child, then layer a pair of dry fleece pajamas over the top. Leave both pairs of pajamas on overnight. The child's body heat creates a layer of high humidity that hydrates the skin. As a physician, I treat older patients, but this approach cleared our son's severe eczema in three days. Answer: : Thanks for sharing this unusual treatment.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | April 9, 2008
He's an office worker who runs at least 30 miles a week and has already logged marathons in 38 states. She's an artist who spends much of her day on her feet preparing for shows -- with breaks to walk the dog. They're slim and healthy 50- somethings. But, to their utter annoyance, they both have high cholesterol. Kelly Kietzke and Diane Getty of South Baltimore know they can't overcome their genes. They could re-evaluate their diets. But what to strip? What to add? Their meals already seemed pretty healthful.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 10, 2008
NEW ORLEANS - In results from an eagerly anticipated study that could greatly change the treatment of cardiovascular disease, researchers have found that statin drugs - now given to millions of people with high cholesterol - can halve the risk of heart attack and stroke in seemingly healthy patients as well. The study of nearly 18,000 people with normal cholesterol found that the drugs lowered the risk of death from heart disease by 20 percent, suggesting that millions more people should be put on a daily regimen.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 12, 1992
There's nothing wrong with Odells night club, just with the people who go there.We will use force to deliver food in Bosnia but the aggressors can stay there, we are not going to harm them.It turns out low cholesterol people die as young as high cholesterol people, only from different causes, so you have been denying yourself steak for nothing.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1992
Genetic Therapy Inc. of Gaithersburg said yesterday that it has obtained the right to a gene that could be used to treat a relatively rare genetic disorder that leaves patients with high cholesterol levels.The non-exclusive licensing agreement with the University of Texas System would allow Genetic Therapy, a biotechnology company, to advance its efforts to develop treatments for the more common forms of high cholesterol, which affect 47 million Americans.Patients with the genetic disorder, familial hypercholesterolemia, lack a gene that produces a low-density lipoprotein receptor.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | June 29, 1993
Q: I am taking medication for high cholesterol and wonder whether my 7-year-old son should have his cholesterol checked.A: Many pediatricians include a measurement of cholesterol as one of their standard blood tests. If the pediatrician hasn't already done so, have your son's cholesterol checked in the near future. There is about a 50 percent chance that your son also has high cholesterol, which can be inherited by half the offspring of an affected father or mother.You should be aware that the cholesterol value is considered abnormal at lower levels in children than in adults.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 13, 1995
A cheap and painless set of tests developed in leading medical centers around the country promises to predict heart disease and stroke, and pinpoint the patients who really need aggressive therapy, far more accurately than do the traditional risk factors.The new method includes a simple measurement of the difference in blood pressure between arms and ankles, and a noninvasive acoustic test that measures narrowing of the carotid arteries that carry blood to the brain.Many patients with high cholesterol levels do not develop heart disease.
NEWS
August 16, 1992
Wouldn't you know it -- just as cholesterol is established as a dietary no-no, along comes word that too little cholesterol may be just as dangerous.Coronary disease is still the No. 1 killer of Americans. The link between high cholesterol levels and heart problems is so strong that medical policies in this country are now heavily biased toward lowering cholesterol levels. Americans have, on average, cholesterol counts of around 200 units, and blanket policies geared toward lowering those levels would inevitably push some people below 160.New large-scale studies (including both men and women)
NEWS
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2008
Keith Miller leads what doctors call a healthy, active lifestyle. The suburban Baltimore teenager has always loved sports and plays soccer competitively. He avoids eating pizza and junk food. But despite all that, Miller had cholesterol levels nearly five times his average peer and underwent a double bypass surgery to repair his heart two years ago when he was 15. Though open-heart surgery remains unusual in young patients, medical experts fear that cholesterol levels are rising at an alarming rate.
NEWS
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2008
Keith Miller leads what doctors call a healthy, active lifestyle. The suburban Baltimore teenager has always loved sports and plays soccer competitively. He avoids eating pizza and junk food. But despite all that, Miller had cholesterol levels nearly five times his average peer and underwent a double bypass surgery to repair his heart two years ago when he was 15. Though open-heart surgery remains unusual in young patients, medical experts fear that cholesterol levels are rising at an alarming rate.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | April 9, 2008
He's an office worker who runs at least 30 miles a week and has already logged marathons in 38 states. She's an artist who spends much of her day on her feet preparing for shows -- with breaks to walk the dog. They're slim and healthy 50- somethings. But, to their utter annoyance, they both have high cholesterol. Kelly Kietzke and Diane Getty of South Baltimore know they can't overcome their genes. They could re-evaluate their diets. But what to strip? What to add? Their meals already seemed pretty healthful.
FEATURES
By Joe and Teresa Graedon | December 13, 2007
I have just begun treatment for hypothyroidism, and for the first time in more than 20 years I feel like I am emerging from a fog. My mental clarity and concentration were terrible. Since starting on Synthroid, I feel like a new person. My question is about my daughter. She is 17 and has some of the same symptoms. Is she too young to have her thyroid tested? Thyroid problems can run in families, so it makes sense to have her thyroid function checked. Depression has many causes and is not always recognized as a symptom of insufficient thyroid hormone.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
For years, doctors have turned the conventional wisdom about the dangers of high cholesterol on its head when it comes to the many thousands of people on dialysis. Despite the general acknowledgement that high cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease and strokes, data have suggested that dialysis patients with high cholesterol have lower death rates than others with supposedly "healthy" blood-lipid levels -- prompting many physicians to refrain from treating dialysis patients with drugs such as statins that can bring cholesterol down.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | January 6, 2002
Q. I had been taking Saint-John's-wort for a few years when I was asked to participate in a double-blind study of Lipitor and Pravachol. I am now taking one of them or a placebo to see if these drugs can reverse the effects of high cholesterol. A few months ago, I read an article suggesting that Saint-John's-wort might reduce the effectiveness of these cholesterol-lowering drugs. The people conducting my study don't know anything about such interactions. Can you shed some light on this for me?
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 10, 2001
Like a modern-day Mary Poppins, food manufacturers are finding that a spoonful of sugar and other tasty ingredients will make the medicine go down - and that aging baby boomers will pay a premium for it. From small, new start-ups like Zoe Foods in Boston, which makes flax and soy cereal designed to ease hot flashes associated with menopause, to giants like Lipton, which makes a margarine that promises to lower cholesterol, companies are developing so-called...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 23, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- For almost 52 million Americans with high cholesterol, the complex causes of heart disease were long ago reduced to a simple formula of good cholesterol and bad cholesterol. The higher the ratio of good cholesterol to bad cholesterol, the greater the chances of staying healthy.Now experiments with genetically engineered mice show that some high-density lipoproteins -- the so-called good HDL cholesterol long thought to prevent heart disease -- may actively cause it.Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have demonstrated that mice with high levels of a common HDL are more likely to develop atherosclerosis than normal mice.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 28, 1999
Q. I read in your column about a nondrug treatment for toenail fungus. Could you please send me the home remedy since I now have fungus myself? The prescription my doctor offered is way too expensive.A. Over the years we have collected lots of remedies for nail fungus. This infection can make nails thick, rough, yellowish-brown and crumbly. Our favorite approach is a vinegar soak -- 1 part vinegar to 2 parts warm water.Q. I took Zocor for high cholesterol and stopped because it caused me to have seizures.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1998
Imagine two pieces of warm cinnamon toast smeared with butter, washed down with chocolate milk. At lunch, a turkey sandwich with mayo on white bread, with a fruit cup and Coke. For an afternoon snack, ice cream with Reese's Pieces, then a fried-chicken leg, french fries and a Diet Coke for dinner. Polish it off with a vanilla/chocolate ice cream cup.That's 24 hours in the food life of one Baltimore Girl Scout, one of about 300 local Boy and Girl Scouts surveyed by researchers. The verdict: More than half of them got too many of their daily calories from fat.Released yesterday at the American Heart Association meeting in Dallas, the study also found that 10 percent of the children exceeded the daily recommended level of cholesterol.
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