Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHigh Bridge
IN THE NEWS

High Bridge

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | August 28, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer today gave the state Department of Transportation the go-ahead to build an 80-foot-high bridge to replace the aging, low Severn River drawbridge in Annapolis, despite fervent objections from city residents.Schaefer issued a letter addressed to the "Citizens of Maryland" stating that federal dollars, or the possible lack thereof, had forced the state to move ahead with plans to build the high bridge."My staff and I talked at length with the Federal Highway Administration in an effort to extend the period of public discussion on the design," Schaefer said in the letter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mark McDonald and Mark McDonald,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2000
NEW DELHI, India - The wall is not a subtle or decorative thing, and it was put there, let's be clear, to keep the poor people out. Slums on one side, India's gleaming high-tech future on the other. The wall was built solely to protect the stately corporate headquarters of NIIT, a huge computer-training and software-services firm. But now there's a breach in that wall. NIIT engineers have notched a computer into the concrete, a weatherproof computer that faces outward, toward a neighboring colony of squatters and itinerant laborers.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 17, 1991
Since 1983 and 1984, when the initial planning and public hearings were held for a replacement of the old Route 450 Severn River bridge, a great deal has changed in Annapolis. For one, this quaint, historic seaport has been besieged by growth and by the inevitable road projects that growth usually brings. Meanwhile, a number of savvy architects and planners have begun to sing the praises of the human-scale charms of towns like Annapolis. People will pay big bucks to live in quaint, old places like Annapolis or Leesburg, Va. -- or even in new places built to feel like them.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1998
Gerald Smith, a star football player at Howard High School, is gently coaching newly retired Rose Marie Weaver, 65, through her rounds on the weights in a school gym."It's good she's trying to stay fit," Smith says of the diminutive Weaver. "Since she doesn't know how to lift [weights] yet, we don't want to do too much or take too much of a chance."Every Tuesday and Thursday morning for 10 weeks, a class of about 18 senior citizens works out with students in an advanced weight-training class.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | August 15, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer told opponents of the planned 80-foot-high Severn River Bridge yesterday that he would consider their case for a lower span.Opponents, who met with Schaefer for about 45 minutes, presented a slide show and a report arguing for a lower crossing and gave him a petition against the high bridge signed by more than6,300 Annapolis-area residents.Schaefer cautioned that he still harbored serious reservations about reconsidering the bridge design because the state would lose $32 million in federal funds toward the estimated $40 million cost unlessit proceeds with its plans now.But for the first time yesterday,the governor indicated he might reconsider the design -- after having repeatedly ruled out that possibility in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Gary Gately | July 28, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- About 350 people chanting "No high bridge!" lined the old Severn River span yesterday and joined hands to protest plans to replace it with an 80-foot-high crossing.The protesters, singing an anti-bridge song to a bagpiper's rendition of "Loch Lomond," marched through the streets of the state capital to the Governor's Mansion, where they rallied and tried to present a written appeal for a lower bridge to Gov. William Donald Schaefer.But nobody from the governor's office emerged to accept the appeal, and protest organizers said they would deliver it to the governor's press office tomorrow.
NEWS
By Gary Gately | August 29, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that the state would proceed with plans to build an 80-foot-high bridge over the Severn River, despite fierce community opposition and the threat of lawsuits to stop construction.The governor warned that the state would lose $32 million in federal money for the planned $40 million span unless it proceeds with the project.Mr. Schaefer announced his decision after a meeting with Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins, state Delegate Michael E. Busch, D-Annapolis, and top state highway officials.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | September 9, 1991
Annapolis lawmakers will meet in closed session tonight to consider whether to go to court to fight the planned 80-foot-high Severn Riverbridge.City Attorney Jonathan A. Hodgson is to brief the City Council on the case before the 7:30 council meeting.The council gave Hodgson the go-ahead to sue to stop the bridge in July. But he said he would file a lawsuit only at the request of aldermen after he outlines specific grounds for a suit and legal strategies.Hodgson refused to discuss specifics of the case, but has told the council the challenge would likely focus on the review processused in selecting the $40 million replacement for the 67-year-old Route 450 drawbridge.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | July 14, 1991
The Severn River Commission has challenged the procedure used to design a proposed 80-foot-high Severn River bridge.Growing, last-minute opposition to a high-span replacement of the failing Route 450 drawbridge prompted commission members Thursday to propose a review of the eight-year design process."
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | July 26, 1991
Hundreds of people are expected to link hands across the old Severn River Bridge tomorrow in a protest against the drawspan's planned 80-foot-high replacement.The protesters, led by Citizens for the Severn Scenic River Bridge, will gather at noon at Jonas Green State Park, then line a sidewalk on the span, joining hands in solidarity against the high bridge.From there, the protesters will walk through the streets of Annapolis to the Governor's Mansion, where they will present an appeal to stop construction of the $40 million bridge.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | March 30, 1992
With the old Severn River Bridge stretching behind them, about 300 Annapolitans sang out their opposition yesterday to plans for a new 80-foot-high span.To the tune of "This Land is Your Land," a crowd that included civic activists, elected representatives, children and a few dogs sang:They want a high bridgeWe want a low bridgeIf they have their sayWe'll have a highwayFrom Washington to our peaceful cityThis bridge is not for you and me!Construction of the new $33.4 million bridge began this month.
NEWS
By Citizen's for and Citizen's for,The Scenic Severn River Bridge and Defense Briefings filed in Baltimore's U.S. District Court. Robert Lee Staff writer | November 25, 1991
Did state and federal highway officials go through all the public hearings and bureaucratic red tape required to replace the beloved old Severn River drawbridge with a behemoth 80-foot span?This and other questions will be weighed tomorrow by U.S. District Judge Joseph C. Howard, who will decide whether to halt work on the Route 450 replacement span, slated to begin next week.Bryson Popham, one of two private Annapolis lawyers representing the city free in its lawsuit challenging the high span, says state and federal highway planners didn't meet all the necessary requirements, but concedes "there is no smoking gun."
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | September 9, 1991
Annapolis lawmakers will meet in closed session tonight to consider whether to go to court to fight the planned 80-foot-high Severn Riverbridge.City Attorney Jonathan A. Hodgson is to brief the City Council on the case before the 7:30 council meeting.The council gave Hodgson the go-ahead to sue to stop the bridge in July. But he said he would file a lawsuit only at the request of aldermen after he outlines specific grounds for a suit and legal strategies.Hodgson refused to discuss specifics of the case, but has told the council the challenge would likely focus on the review processused in selecting the $40 million replacement for the 67-year-old Route 450 drawbridge.
NEWS
By Gary Gately | August 29, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that the state would proceed with plans to build an 80-foot-high bridge over the Severn River, despite fierce community opposition and the threat of lawsuits to stop construction.The governor warned that the state would lose $32 million in federal money for the planned $40 million span unless it proceeds with the project.Mr. Schaefer announced his decision after a meeting with Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins, state Delegate Michael E. Busch, D-Annapolis, and top state highway officials.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | August 28, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer today gave the state Department of Transportation the go-ahead to build an 80-foot-high bridge to replace the aging, low Severn River drawbridge in Annapolis, despite fervent objections from city residents.Schaefer issued a letter addressed to the "Citizens of Maryland" stating that federal dollars, or the possible lack thereof, had forced the state to move ahead with plans to build the high bridge."My staff and I talked at length with the Federal Highway Administration in an effort to extend the period of public discussion on the design," Schaefer said in the letter.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | August 15, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer told opponents of the planned 80-foot-high Severn River Bridge yesterday that he would consider their case for a lower span.Opponents, who met with Schaefer for about 45 minutes, presented a slide show and a report arguing for a lower crossing and gave him a petition against the high bridge signed by more than6,300 Annapolis-area residents.Schaefer cautioned that he still harbored serious reservations about reconsidering the bridge design because the state would lose $32 million in federal funds toward the estimated $40 million cost unlessit proceeds with its plans now.But for the first time yesterday,the governor indicated he might reconsider the design -- after having repeatedly ruled out that possibility in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Citizen's for and Citizen's for,The Scenic Severn River Bridge and Defense Briefings filed in Baltimore's U.S. District Court. Robert Lee Staff writer | November 25, 1991
Did state and federal highway officials go through all the public hearings and bureaucratic red tape required to replace the beloved old Severn River drawbridge with a behemoth 80-foot span?This and other questions will be weighed tomorrow by U.S. District Judge Joseph C. Howard, who will decide whether to halt work on the Route 450 replacement span, slated to begin next week.Bryson Popham, one of two private Annapolis lawyers representing the city free in its lawsuit challenging the high span, says state and federal highway planners didn't meet all the necessary requirements, but concedes "there is no smoking gun."
NEWS
By Gary Gately | July 28, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- About 350 people chanting "No high bridge!" lined the old Severn River span yesterday and joined hands to protest plans to replace it with an 80-foot-high crossing.The protesters, singing an anti-bridge song to a bagpiper's rendition of "Loch Lomond," marched through the streets of the state capital to the Governor's Mansion, where they rallied and tried to present a written appeal for a lower bridge to Gov. William Donald Schaefer.But nobody from the governor's office emerged to accept the appeal, and protest organizers said they would deliver it to the governor's press office tomorrow.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | July 26, 1991
Hundreds of people are expected to link hands across the old Severn River Bridge tomorrow in a protest against the drawspan's planned 80-foot-high replacement.The protesters, led by Citizens for the Severn Scenic River Bridge, will gather at noon at Jonas Green State Park, then line a sidewalk on the span, joining hands in solidarity against the high bridge.From there, the protesters will walk through the streets of Annapolis to the Governor's Mansion, where they will present an appeal to stop construction of the $40 million bridge.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.