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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 26, 1998
Imagine "A Star Is Born" set in New York's downtown art world, with heroin addiction replacing alcoholism, and you get a pretty clear idea of "High Art," the feature film debut of writer-director Lisa Cholodenko.Starring Radha Mitchell as a young, ambitious magazine editor and Ally Sheedy as the world-weary photographer who becomes her mentor -- and, eventually, much more -- "High Art" has a knowing take on the particular sub-strata it documents, and it marks a startling return to the screen by Sheedy, who should finally shed any lasting effects of her association with the teen comedies of John Hughes.
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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | June 1, 2008
In Studio 702, Billy Joel sings "The Piano Man" as Baltimore native Brian Glazer Gerber swirls red paint around a large canvas he has stretched across the floor. In 904, writer Sarah Richards types notes to herself for a tale about the "camping trip from Hell" that she'll relate this month as part of the popular storytelling series at Center Stage, "The Stoop." Open House 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday. Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower, 15 S. Eutaw St. Visitors can register for a drawing to win a work of art donated by the tower artists.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 1, 1997
There are other famous pop artists, of course, Robert Rauschenberg and James Rosenquist and Claes Oldenburg notable among them. But of them all, Andy Warhol (of the Brillo boxes and the Campbell soup cans) and Roy Lichtenstein (of the comic strips) are the most identified with the movement. And they were in many ways complete opposites.Though Warhol's is the better-known name right now, it's impossible at this point to tell which is the greater artist. That will be for the ages to decide.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 12, 2008
Here are a few raveled threads plucked from that highly charged evening at the Metropolitan Museum, put on by Vogue's Anna Wintour last week. (And, incidentally, did you know that the editor's rather controversial Chanel dress, described as looking a bit like ram's horns, was called "Storm"?) The big hit of the night, I'm told, was tennis ace Venus Williams in a bronze Carolina Herrera gown, wearing a Fred Leighton diadem upside down like a tennis band in her hair. She is being pronounced the best of the non-Hollywood A list.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | July 25, 1995
The visual art of Lawrence Ferlinghetti offers evidence that the strength of the artist does not lie primarily in the facility of the hand. He will take no prizes for technique. But he does possess the artist's essential quality -- the passionate desire to communicate to the world something worthwhile.At 76, Ferlinghetti is better known for his poetry, prose and left-leaning political activism than for his paintings and drawings. His best-known books include "Pictures of the Gone World" and "A Coney Island of the Mind."
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 28, 1990
"Fitzgerald said there are no second acts in America. Well we'll see," says Grace Hartigan, whose career may be poised for a socko second act beginning this fall.The curtain went down on its first act 30 years ago. After recognition as one of the leading abstract expressionist artists of the 1950s, in 1960 she married Dr. Winston Price, a researcher at Johns Hopkins, and moved from New York to Baltimore. She views that move now as both salvation and destruction."The attention that I got in the 1950s was almost impossible to deal with," she says.
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By Helen Molesworth and By Helen Molesworth,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2000
"The Ephemeral Museum," by Francis Haskell. Yale University Press. 200 pages. $25. One of the most influential art historical essays of the post- World War II period is German philosopher Walter Benjamin's "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction." It is a difficult text, but one of it main points, in a nutshell, is that the invention of photography radically changed our relationship to high art. Photography meant that reproductions of famous paintings and sculptures -- once only able to be viewed by the wealthy -- could be seen by anyone.
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By Becky S. Yoshitani and Becky S. Yoshitani,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 1998
Chin resting on hand, the engineer's image is permanently frozen in a pensive pose. His silver face floats in midair -- on one side three-dimensional and full of character, the other side hollow and phantasmal.This is the work of J. Carlton French, 50, a Howard County advertising entrepreneur turned carpenter and sculptor. Using relief casting methods, French creates "life masks," an artistic technique that forms sculptures straight from the skin of his subjects."You always see yourself two-dimensionally -- through photographs or the mirror," French says, pointing out that his sculptures give their subjects a three-dimensional view.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 1999
Most of the great tragic operas are potboilers par excellence. But even among the hyperemotional extravaganzas of the musical stage, Puccini's "Tosca" is more melodramatic than most.Taken from Victorien Sardou's play of the same name, which was written for no less a scene-stealer than Sarah Bernhardt, the plot of "Tosca" is one campy cliche after another.Floria Tosca, the tempestuous singer, "lives for art and lives for love."Her lover, Cavaradossi, is a hot- blooded anti-monarchist consumed by love and ready to put it all on the line for his republican beliefs.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 15, 1992
Ah, Paris in the 1890s, the glamorous world of such entertainers as Yvette Guilbert and Loie Fuller, the carefree pastimes of bicyling and ice skating, the heady fascination with progress. It must have been a fine time to be alive, and that spirit comes through in the attractive "Signs of the Time:Turn-of-the-Century French Posters" at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Posters could be high art, but they were advertisements, too, so they reflect particularities of their age. And among much else these reflect the incredibly active art world.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | December 14, 2005
The current show at Maryland Art Place, which includes a stuffed deer's head, a plaster chicken with the face of Jesus and landscape paintings festooned with odiferous discs of air freshener, brings to mind the late critic Clement Greenberg's seminal 1939 essay "Avant-Garde and Kitsch." Greenberg sought to explain how modern industrial societies had produced two radically different kinds of artwork. The first he called high culture - advanced painting and sculpture created by avant-garde artists in order to propel the possibilities of their media forward.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
Harold Edward Smith Jr., a Federal Hill artist who had been chairman of the art department at Dulaney High School for more than a decade, died of liver disease Sept. 11 at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 62. Mr. Smith, who was born in Baltimore and raised in Glyndon, was a 1960 graduate of Milford Mill High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts in 1965 and a master's degree in fine arts in 1969, both from Maryland Institute College of Art. He began his teaching career in 1965 at Franklin High School, and when Randallstown High School opened in 1969 he became chairman of its art department.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | May 16, 2005
Forty 6-foot-tall decorated crabs will hit the streets of Baltimore today, and with their fiberglass pincers thrust into the air, they might resemble the crustacean version of baseball fans doing the wave. Or the Village People performing "YMCA." The crabs, scheduled to be unveiled today by Mayor Martin O'Malley, are the latest incarnation of a public art form that has charmed viewers nationwide - remember the Fish Out of Water project that raised $670,000 for Baltimore schools in 2001?
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 9, 2005
NEW YORK - Andy Warhol ironically called his studio The Factory; artist Jeff Koons' studio in the art-crazed Chelsea district is the real thing. Forget about romantic garrets with exposed wooden beams and skylights: Koons' work space is a high-tech engineering lab - a warren of white industrial cubes stuffed chock-a-block with the artist's 40 full-time assistants and their tools and equipment. Here, Koons and his helpers churn out dozens of artworks each year that unapologetically glorify America's materialistic consumer culture: aluminum dolphins, caterpillars, seals and walruses painted to look like inflatable pool toys; resin models of comic book superheroes; computer-designed, hand-painted collages that jumble cartoons, botanical illustrations, inflatables and pop icons in a crazy quilt of old and new, high art and low. And no matter how hard a visitor resists the thought, one question nags: But is it art?
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By Kate Murphy and Kate Murphy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 2005
Most schoolchildren know how to fold a page like this one into a hat or a boat. But while many consider it mere child's play, more and more artists are creating startlingly original origami that transcend the humble craft. While adhering to the basic rule of leaving the starting sheet of paper intact (no cutting!), origami artists are more than merely talented folders, asserts Paul Jackson, who lives outside Tel Aviv. His so-called one crease series of works, a sort of a minimalist origami, has an animated quality, as if the paper were contorted by and floating in the wind.
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February 16, 2003
Dorsey Kent Wallace, who taught art in Baltimore County public schools for 27 years, died of kidney failure Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 55. Mr. Wallace was born and raised in Cambridge, and graduated from Cambridge High School in 1965. He earned his bachelor's degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1969 and began teaching in county schools in 1970. The former Glen Burnie resident retired in 1997 from Dundalk High. Earlier, he had been on the faculty of Owings Mills and Sparrows Point high schools.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | December 14, 2005
The current show at Maryland Art Place, which includes a stuffed deer's head, a plaster chicken with the face of Jesus and landscape paintings festooned with odiferous discs of air freshener, brings to mind the late critic Clement Greenberg's seminal 1939 essay "Avant-Garde and Kitsch." Greenberg sought to explain how modern industrial societies had produced two radically different kinds of artwork. The first he called high culture - advanced painting and sculpture created by avant-garde artists in order to propel the possibilities of their media forward.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | May 16, 2005
Forty 6-foot-tall decorated crabs will hit the streets of Baltimore today, and with their fiberglass pincers thrust into the air, they might resemble the crustacean version of baseball fans doing the wave. Or the Village People performing "YMCA." The crabs, scheduled to be unveiled today by Mayor Martin O'Malley, are the latest incarnation of a public art form that has charmed viewers nationwide - remember the Fish Out of Water project that raised $670,000 for Baltimore schools in 2001?
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By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2003
One of the most accomplished directors of television commercials ever, Joe Pytka would rarely seem at a loss for how to make one. He has created thousands of TV ads, from Pepsi and McDonald's spots to the famed "This Is Your Brain on Drugs" series. His portfolio includes more than 30 Super Bowl commercials and the 1996 Warner Bros. cartoon movie Space Jam. His fee is $15,000 a day. But when presented last spring with a concept for a Gatorade commercial depicting Michael Jordan playing basketball against a younger version of himself - to air during Super Bowl XXXVII on Sunday - Pytka was uncertain he could pull it off. "It was almost like an impossible project.
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By Helen Molesworth and By Helen Molesworth,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2000
"The Ephemeral Museum," by Francis Haskell. Yale University Press. 200 pages. $25. One of the most influential art historical essays of the post- World War II period is German philosopher Walter Benjamin's "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction." It is a difficult text, but one of it main points, in a nutshell, is that the invention of photography radically changed our relationship to high art. Photography meant that reproductions of famous paintings and sculptures -- once only able to be viewed by the wealthy -- could be seen by anyone.
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