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October 5, 2006
On September 28, 2006, HESTER ANN HIGGINBOTHAM. Born October 16, 1916. Hester was a licensed practical nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD. She is survived by her devoted husband, James Gordon Higginbotham, her loving children, Gloria Lee Hinmon Kisner, James Edward Hinmon, Marlene Theresa Higginbotham Waddy and David Gordon Higginbotham, loving grandmother of Angela Lee Kisner, Bryan James Hinmon, Justin Gordon Higginbotham, E. Byron Waddy...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Ethne F. Higginbotham, an educator who later became a mental health counselor, died Wednesday of a urinary tract infection at Brightview South River, an Edgewater assisted-living facility. She was 92. The daughter of Robert Lee Flanagan, a paper mill executive, and Laura Ethne Crowder Flanagan, a homemaker, Ethne Crowder Flanagan was born in Farmville, N.C., and was raised there and in Richmond, Va. She was a 1938 graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School. She attended Westhampton College, the women's college of the University of Richmond, where she was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and a summa cum laude graduate in 1942.
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NEWS
October 16, 1990
A memorial service for Forrest I. Higginbotham, a retired accountant for the Internal Revenue Service, will be held at 6:30 p.m. today at St. James Episcopal Church, Lafayette and Arlington avenues.Mr. Higginbotham, who was 65 and lived in Pikesville, died Friday at University Hospital after a heart attack.He retired in 1983 after 30 years of service in the IRS office in Baltimore. He had earlier worked for the Afro-American and what is now Morgan State University.A native of Worcester, Mass.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2011
The University of Baltimore has tapped law professor Michael Higginbotham to serve as interim dean of its law school after former dean Phil Closius resigned last week. In announcing Higginbotham's appointment Tuesday, university President Robert L. Bogomolny said, "He is among the most respected members of the UB law faculty, and his natural leadership skills and unquestionable integrity will maintain the School of Law's forward momentum during this transitional period. " In an e-mail Friday to the law school community, Closius said he was forced to resign because of his persistent complaints about the amount of law school revenue the university takes to support for other programs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
The Rev. Leland Higginbotham, a former pastor of Calvary Baptist Church in Towson who was a powerful voice in the anti-war and civil rights movements of the 1960s, died Monday of leukemia at his Annapolis home. He was 84. "He was a man who brought an incredible intensity, vigor and intelligence to whatever he did," said the Rev. John E. Roberts, a friend of more than 40 years, who retired as pastor of Woodbrook Baptist Church in North Baltimore. "Higgie had an incredibly strong sense of justice and was very outspoken on the Vietnam War and civil rights," said the Rev. Frederick K. Weimert, who became pastor of Calvary after Mr. Higginbotham's retirement in 1981.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2002
It is 1780, and you are a passionate abolitionist Quaker living in Philadelphia. You are also a representative in the state legislature, but more than that, you are the deciding vote on a momentous anti-slavery bill now before the assembly. With your assenting vote, children born to current female slaves will be emancipated when they reach age 28 and their children will be free at birth. Vote no, and Pennsylvania will fail to become the first state to pass an abolition measure of any kind.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
A 27-year-old Northwest Baltimore man was convicted yesterday of stabbing a Diamond cab driver to death and stealing his Bible and other religious possessions during a robbery.After deliberating almost three hours, the Baltimore Circuit Court jury found Tracey Higginbotham of the 3000 block of West Belvedere Avenue guilty of first-degree murder and armed robbery in the death of Lyle G. Roberts, 56.Higginbotham is to be sentenced April 3. The maximum sentence for first-degree murder is life imprisonment; for armed robbery, 20 years.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
On September 26, 2003, unexpectedly at home, ROBERT ANTHONY KISNER, beloved son of Dr. Robert Kisner and Gloria Hinmon Kisner, loving brother of Angela Lee Kisner Gregory, adored grandson of James and Hester Higginbotham and the late Robert and Thelma Kisner, loving nephew of Nathaniel Allen, David Higginbotham and his wife LaTanya, James Hinmon, Edward Kisner, James Kisner, William Kisner and predeceased by uncles Andrew and Delbert Kisner. Tony, as he was known to many, is also survived by three aunts, Marlene Waddy and her husband, Dr. Edward Waddy, Deborah Brown and her husband, Sinclair Brown, Denise Kisner and the late Jacquelyn and Donald Dix. Tony is also survived by cherished niece, Alexis Lee Gregory, and by numerous cousins and friends Friends may call at the Witzke Funeral Home of Columbia, Inc., 5555 Twin Knolls Road (1st exit off Rt. 175 & Thunderhill Road)
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | February 8, 1992
Black History Month 1992 comes at a grim time. The observances begun by Carter G. Woodson early in this century usually serve to remind blacks and whites of so much that has been ignored in the diorama presented as American History.Now, however, a deeper reading of black history is in order. With political majorities in this country calling ''liberal'' ideology outmoded and many younger blacks believing civil-rights battles are all in the past, it is time for frank appraisals and blunt recognitions: Civil rights is a battle that has never ended in the 500-year history of American settlement.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell,Sun Staff Writers | January 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a cavernous hearing room, the steady murmuring of little Alison Higginbotham, 6, echoed off the high arched ceiling as the adults argued yesterday over who and how much to slash from Social Security's troubled disability aid program.Cut 86,000 addicts, said Rep. E. Clay Shaw Jr. of South Florida.Cut 166,000 refugees, said Stephen Moore of the conservative Cato Institute.Cut 200,000 children, said Rep. Jim McCrery of Louisiana.Even that wouldn't make much of a dent in the 6.3 million people collecting monthly checks from the Supplemental Security Income program -- a welfare plan for disabled and elderly poor people that costs taxpayers $25 billion a year.
NEWS
October 5, 2006
On September 28, 2006, HESTER ANN HIGGINBOTHAM. Born October 16, 1916. Hester was a licensed practical nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD. She is survived by her devoted husband, James Gordon Higginbotham, her loving children, Gloria Lee Hinmon Kisner, James Edward Hinmon, Marlene Theresa Higginbotham Waddy and David Gordon Higginbotham, loving grandmother of Angela Lee Kisner, Bryan James Hinmon, Justin Gordon Higginbotham, E. Byron Waddy...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
The Rev. Leland Higginbotham, a former pastor of Calvary Baptist Church in Towson who was a powerful voice in the anti-war and civil rights movements of the 1960s, died Monday of leukemia at his Annapolis home. He was 84. "He was a man who brought an incredible intensity, vigor and intelligence to whatever he did," said the Rev. John E. Roberts, a friend of more than 40 years, who retired as pastor of Woodbrook Baptist Church in North Baltimore. "Higgie had an incredibly strong sense of justice and was very outspoken on the Vietnam War and civil rights," said the Rev. Frederick K. Weimert, who became pastor of Calvary after Mr. Higginbotham's retirement in 1981.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
On September 26, 2003, unexpectedly at home, ROBERT ANTHONY KISNER, beloved son of Dr. Robert Kisner and Gloria Hinmon Kisner, loving brother of Angela Lee Kisner Gregory, adored grandson of James and Hester Higginbotham and the late Robert and Thelma Kisner, loving nephew of Nathaniel Allen, David Higginbotham and his wife LaTanya, James Hinmon, Edward Kisner, James Kisner, William Kisner and predeceased by uncles Andrew and Delbert Kisner. Tony, as he was known to many, is also survived by three aunts, Marlene Waddy and her husband, Dr. Edward Waddy, Deborah Brown and her husband, Sinclair Brown, Denise Kisner and the late Jacquelyn and Donald Dix. Tony is also survived by cherished niece, Alexis Lee Gregory, and by numerous cousins and friends Friends may call at the Witzke Funeral Home of Columbia, Inc., 5555 Twin Knolls Road (1st exit off Rt. 175 & Thunderhill Road)
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2002
It is 1780, and you are a passionate abolitionist Quaker living in Philadelphia. You are also a representative in the state legislature, but more than that, you are the deciding vote on a momentous anti-slavery bill now before the assembly. With your assenting vote, children born to current female slaves will be emancipated when they reach age 28 and their children will be free at birth. Vote no, and Pennsylvania will fail to become the first state to pass an abolition measure of any kind.
NEWS
December 16, 1998
JUST TWO WEEKS ago, he appeared the picture of health when he testified before the House Judiciary Committee. Monday, A. Leon Higginbotham died at the age of 70 after a series of strokes.When he retired in 1993, Higginbotham was chief judge of the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia. He was later awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, for his contributions to his profession and country, including his landmark multivolume work, Race and the American Legal Process.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 17, 1995
DURING A fund-raiser for the Congressional Black Caucus in Washington last summer, the evening's featured speaker, former federal judge A. Leon Higginbotham Jr., offered a list of great African-American leaders, past and present.Among those he named was Baltimore's Rep. Kweisi Mfume, a former Black Caucus chairman. Delegate Howard A. "Pete" Rawlings, who attended the event, says he was pleased to find that a federal judge shared his own high regard for the congressman.And today he understands the accolade even more clearly.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 17, 1995
DURING A fund-raiser for the Congressional Black Caucus in Washington last summer, the evening's featured speaker, former federal judge A. Leon Higginbotham Jr., offered a list of great African-American leaders, past and present.Among those he named was Baltimore's Rep. Kweisi Mfume, a former Black Caucus chairman. Delegate Howard A. "Pete" Rawlings, who attended the event, says he was pleased to find that a federal judge shared his own high regard for the congressman.And today he understands the accolade even more clearly.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell,Sun Staff Writers | January 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a cavernous hearing room, the steady murmuring of little Alison Higginbotham, 6, echoed off the high arched ceiling as the adults argued yesterday over who and how much to slash from Social Security's troubled disability aid program.Cut 86,000 addicts, said Rep. E. Clay Shaw Jr. of South Florida.Cut 166,000 refugees, said Stephen Moore of the conservative Cato Institute.Cut 200,000 children, said Rep. Jim McCrery of Louisiana.Even that wouldn't make much of a dent in the 6.3 million people collecting monthly checks from the Supplemental Security Income program -- a welfare plan for disabled and elderly poor people that costs taxpayers $25 billion a year.
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