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NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
WILSON MILL -- The cold waters of Deer Creek just below this old mill dam in Harford County are stirring with life being spawned by migrating fish. Midstream, where water bubbles over and around the rocks at a furious rate, schools of alewife herring and hickory shad are holding themselves against the current, waiting for nature to tell them to move on. Every so often, the calmer pools and eddies explode with the splashes of spawning. What these fish don't know -- and what state Department of Natural Resources officials hope they will soon figure out -- is there is a way around this dam, which has stood here for more than 200 years.
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NEWS
March 5, 2011
Patrick Sapack of Baltimore County writes: About 15 years ago, I was taking a walk on the Gunpowder River off Route 7 (Philadelphia Road) about a mile towards the east. I saw a family catching herring. Can you please inform me as to when these fish run and what type of bait to use. Also, what type of regulations are herring bound by in Maryland? There is very little information in the Maryland fishing guides and the regulations involving dip nets is very confusing. Marty Gary , a Department of Natural Resources biologist, replies: There are two species of herring that spawn in Maryland's tidal tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. They are alewife herring and blue back herring.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
While the record-high juvenile index for striped bass (rockfish) caused quite a stir Friday, there also was good news about white perch, yellow perch, blueback herring and hickory shad, all of which benefited from good environmental conditions in Maryland waters this spring and summer.The preliminary figures for this year's white perch index indicate a strong resurgence. The 1993 index is 100.4, far exceeding the previous record high of 60.5 in 1970.The yellow perch index is 1.8, also a record, but only slightly above the 1970 reading of 1.6.The blueback herring index was 73.5, exceeded only in 1969 an1970.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 2, 2006
What could be better than word that the shad are running in the Susquehanna River? Word that the Department of Natural Resources and Exelon Generation, the owner of the Conowingo Dam and shoreline below it, have worked out the details to provide greater access to Fisherman's Park on the Harford County side of the river and Octoraro Creek on the Cecil County side. After months of negotiations and discussions with fishing groups, the state and utility have a plan that is likely to please both Homeland Security folks and the federal agency that oversees generating plants.
SPORTS
By GARY DIAMOND COL OUTDOORS | April 18, 1993
Before the devastating effects of Hurricane Agnes, the waters of the Susquehanna River, Deer Creek and Octoraro Creek teemed with huge numbers of spawning hickory shad.Granted, the historic storm was responsible for the untimely demise of a small segment of the river's total shad population, but overfishing, pollution and loss of upstream spawning areas nearly caused this popular gamefish to become extinct.The first hickory shad usually arrive at the mouth of Deer Creek by the second week in April.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 18, 1995
The total acreage of submerged grasses in the Chesapeake Bay is down. Blue crab populations may be dropping to cyclic lows, as bluefish already have.But American shad -- with much help from state and federal governments, industry and individuals -- may be making a comeback of sorts.The resurgence of shad has not reached the proportions of the recovery of rockfish, which in the past 10 years have re-established themselves in the bay and along the Atlantic Coast. Rather, shad are making slower progress.
NEWS
March 5, 2011
Patrick Sapack of Baltimore County writes: About 15 years ago, I was taking a walk on the Gunpowder River off Route 7 (Philadelphia Road) about a mile towards the east. I saw a family catching herring. Can you please inform me as to when these fish run and what type of bait to use. Also, what type of regulations are herring bound by in Maryland? There is very little information in the Maryland fishing guides and the regulations involving dip nets is very confusing. Marty Gary , a Department of Natural Resources biologist, replies: There are two species of herring that spawn in Maryland's tidal tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. They are alewife herring and blue back herring.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
One of the broken links in the Chesapeake Bay's chain of life is being mended in the coffee-brown water of the upper Patuxent River. The shadbushes are blooming along the forested banks near Davidsonville. And beneath the water's surface, the shad are running, returning to spawn in the river's headwaters from points as far-flung as the Bay of Fundy. The bay's once-huge spring shad runs were nearly driven to extinction in the 1970s, forcing state officials to shut down the commercial fishery.
NEWS
By Gary Diamond | May 10, 1992
A few weeks ago, while checking reports of schooling hickory shad at the Deer Creek Bridge on Stafford Road, I was pleasantly surprised to see the return of two old friends, a pair of bald eagles.They were perched atop their huge nest, which they carefully built among the branches of a mature oak nearly three years ago. In March 1989, an army of bird watchers, armed with spotting scopes, cameras, telephoto lenses and binoculars, swarmed to the site and watched for several weeks as the eagles transformed hundreds of sticks into a nest measuring nearly 6 feet in diameter.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
The annual young-of-the-year index for rockfish was announced yesterday as 59.3, the highest recorded in Maryland since the survey of spawning success began in 1954. (Related article, Page 1B.)But equally important is that the young-of-the-year indexes for virtually all other tidewater fish that spawn in the Chesapeake Bay's tributaries are up, as well."White perch, yellow perch, hickory shad, American shad -- all appear to be well-above the averages this year," said Don Cosden, who leads the Department of Natural Resources fisheries-service teams that complete the survey.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
Steel-jawed machines ripped apart a century-old stone dam on a stream near the Susquehanna River yesterday, which will enable blue-backed herring and hickory shad to swim to their spawning grounds. The demolition of the Octoraro Creek Dam will help struggling species, including American eel, travel into a 20-mile section of the tributary that has been blocked for about 100 years, said David Sutherland, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. As part of a national effort to remove river blockages that have almost wiped out several varieties of fish, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has worked with federal agencies to demolish about a dozen dams since 1989, the last in 2000.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2002
One of the broken links in the Chesapeake Bay's chain of life is being mended in the coffee-brown water of the upper Patuxent River. The shadbushes are blooming along the forested banks near Davidsonville. And beneath the water's surface, the shad are running, returning to spawn in the river's headwaters from points as far-flung as the Bay of Fundy. The bay's once-huge spring shad runs were nearly driven to extinction in the 1970s, forcing state officials to shut down the commercial fishery.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 20, 2001
WHEN I moved to Maryland in 1976, I met a lot of crusty old guys who spoke of a certain silvery fish the way other men spoke of great baseball players. "You should have seen Ted Williams' swing" had the same nostalgic ring as, "You should have seen the shad run in the Susquehanna." The message: You missed both, kid, and neither ain't never comin' back. Once upon a time, the sleek shad - "the poor man's salmon" - had appeared in breathtaking abundance. Capt. John Smith touted their thick numbers in his accounts of the Virginia colony and Chesapeake Bay. By the early 1800s, shad constituted the most important commercial catch on the Susquehanna River; millions of the long-distance swimmers ended up in nets there every spring.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
WILSON MILL -- The cold waters of Deer Creek just below this old mill dam in Harford County are stirring with life being spawned by migrating fish. Midstream, where water bubbles over and around the rocks at a furious rate, schools of alewife herring and hickory shad are holding themselves against the current, waiting for nature to tell them to move on. Every so often, the calmer pools and eddies explode with the splashes of spawning. What these fish don't know -- and what state Department of Natural Resources officials hope they will soon figure out -- is there is a way around this dam, which has stood here for more than 200 years.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
The annual young-of-the-year index for rockfish was announced yesterday as 59.3, the highest recorded in Maryland since the survey of spawning success began in 1954. (Related article, Page 1B.)But equally important is that the young-of-the-year indexes for virtually all other tidewater fish that spawn in the Chesapeake Bay's tributaries are up, as well."White perch, yellow perch, hickory shad, American shad -- all appear to be well-above the averages this year," said Don Cosden, who leads the Department of Natural Resources fisheries-service teams that complete the survey.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 18, 1995
The total acreage of submerged grasses in the Chesapeake Bay is down. Blue crab populations may be dropping to cyclic lows, as bluefish already have.But American shad -- with much help from state and federal governments, industry and individuals -- may be making a comeback of sorts.The resurgence of shad has not reached the proportions of the recovery of rockfish, which in the past 10 years have re-established themselves in the bay and along the Atlantic Coast. Rather, shad are making slower progress.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
Steel-jawed machines ripped apart a century-old stone dam on a stream near the Susquehanna River yesterday, which will enable blue-backed herring and hickory shad to swim to their spawning grounds. The demolition of the Octoraro Creek Dam will help struggling species, including American eel, travel into a 20-mile section of the tributary that has been blocked for about 100 years, said David Sutherland, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. As part of a national effort to remove river blockages that have almost wiped out several varieties of fish, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has worked with federal agencies to demolish about a dozen dams since 1989, the last in 2000.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 2, 2006
What could be better than word that the shad are running in the Susquehanna River? Word that the Department of Natural Resources and Exelon Generation, the owner of the Conowingo Dam and shoreline below it, have worked out the details to provide greater access to Fisherman's Park on the Harford County side of the river and Octoraro Creek on the Cecil County side. After months of negotiations and discussions with fishing groups, the state and utility have a plan that is likely to please both Homeland Security folks and the federal agency that oversees generating plants.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
While the record-high juvenile index for striped bass (rockfish) caused quite a stir Friday, there also was good news about white perch, yellow perch, blueback herring and hickory shad, all of which benefited from good environmental conditions in Maryland waters this spring and summer.The preliminary figures for this year's white perch index indicate a strong resurgence. The 1993 index is 100.4, far exceeding the previous record high of 60.5 in 1970.The yellow perch index is 1.8, also a record, but only slightly above the 1970 reading of 1.6.The blueback herring index was 73.5, exceeded only in 1969 an1970.
SPORTS
By GARY DIAMOND COL OUTDOORS | April 18, 1993
Before the devastating effects of Hurricane Agnes, the waters of the Susquehanna River, Deer Creek and Octoraro Creek teemed with huge numbers of spawning hickory shad.Granted, the historic storm was responsible for the untimely demise of a small segment of the river's total shad population, but overfishing, pollution and loss of upstream spawning areas nearly caused this popular gamefish to become extinct.The first hickory shad usually arrive at the mouth of Deer Creek by the second week in April.
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