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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1995
When Gerry Hamill rolls over in bed just before 8 o'clock this morning, his thoughts will flash back 54 years to that warm Hawaiian morning when he lay in his bunk contemplating a big breakfast of bacon and eggs, pancakes and fruit.But the young Army Air Corps aircraft mechanic didn't get breakfast that day, or lunch or dinner -- he was battling the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and Hickam Field, Dec. 7, 1941.Mr. Hamill, 75, said that all these years later, "I still can't believe it happened to us. We thought that if war broke out we were in the safest place, thousands of miles from anywhere."
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 20, 2009
Raymond Kenneth Hebden, a retired aircraft inspector and foreman of mechanics at Westinghouse Electric Corp. and a World War II veteran, died Dec. 13 of complications from colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Roland Park resident was 88. Mr. Hebden was born in Baltimore and spent his early years in Cedarcroft. He later was raised in Elkridge, where his father was superintendent of Parkwood Cemetery and Meadowridge Cemetery. He graduated from City College in 1939, and enlisted in the Army Air Corps the next year.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 20, 2009
Raymond Kenneth Hebden, a retired aircraft inspector and foreman of mechanics at Westinghouse Electric Corp. and a World War II veteran, died Dec. 13 of complications from colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Roland Park resident was 88. Mr. Hebden was born in Baltimore and spent his early years in Cedarcroft. He later was raised in Elkridge, where his father was superintendent of Parkwood Cemetery and Meadowridge Cemetery. He graduated from City College in 1939, and enlisted in the Army Air Corps the next year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Herman J. Travers, a retired postal worker who survived the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later received two Bronze Stars for heroism during the Battle of Peleiu, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Tuesday at Genesis Loch Raven Center. He was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised in Canton, Mr. Travers attended Patterson High School for a year before dropping out and going to work in waterfront packing houses in Fells Point and Canton to help support his family.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Herman J. Travers, a retired postal worker who survived the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later received two Bronze Stars for heroism during the Battle of Peleiu, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Tuesday at Genesis Loch Raven Center. He was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised in Canton, Mr. Travers attended Patterson High School for a year before dropping out and going to work in waterfront packing houses in Fells Point and Canton to help support his family.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | November 1, 1990
Paris.SADDAM HUSSEIN seems determined to reject any compromise that might save his people from war, while George Bush's talk could make that war worse than it might otherwise be.There has been no lack of efforts to find a compromise. Even Saudi Arabia briefly floated a proposal others have promoted, that Iraq give back most of Kuwait and negotiate with the Arab League and Kuwait's rulers for the rest. Last weekend, the Soviet envoy, Yevgeni Primakov, was in Baghdad again to suggest a new Arab diplomatic initiative.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2003
Mary Jo Hill was 8 years old, living on Hawaii's North Shore, when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. Her mother thought the attack was an Army-Navy training exercise. It wasn't until her father, an Army doctor on duty, called home that the family realized the bombing was real. Warren Coligny, a then-20-year-old Navy ship-fitter second class, was just waking up for duty that fateful Sunday morning. He was supposed to be leaving the island the next day. He spent the next few months patrolling the island.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1999
EYES FILLED with tears, voice trembling, Hugh M. Roper read aloud from a Western Union telegram sent 58 years ago: "Am safe. Unharmed." And below that message in his mother's handwriting: "Thank God for this.""I'm sorry," Roper, 78, said to 13-year-old Chris Tucker. "This is extremely emotional for me. This is the first notice they had, five days after the attack."Dated Dec. 12, 1941, the telegram was sent by Roper from Hawaii to his family in Baltimore to tell them that he had survived the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
It was the last Saturday night in a world that was about to be suddenly and irrevocably changed by the agony and death of war. Rose Acker recalls Dec. 6, 1941, as a balmy Saturday night in Hawaii, not untypical weather for that time of the year. She and her husband, James Mandris, an architect, always played bridge with several other couples on Saturday nights at tables set up in the living room of their small white cottage. They resided on Spencer Street in the Makiki neighborhood in the foothills above Honolulu, where they had a clear view of Pearl Harbor, some nine miles away, and the naval vessels that rode at anchor.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
He was a 19-year-old private from Baltimore, stationed in Hawaii at the Army Air Corps' Hickam Field. Now, he is 80 and a retired officer living in Columbia, hearing noises he hasn't heard in 60 years. When pundits compare yesterday's attacks on the United States to the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing of Pearl Harbor, survivor Hugh Roper says they are right in more ways than one. The weather "was unbelieveably gorgeous" that December morning in Hawaii, he says. Much like yesterday's blue skies and light breeze.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1995
When Gerry Hamill rolls over in bed just before 8 o'clock this morning, his thoughts will flash back 54 years to that warm Hawaiian morning when he lay in his bunk contemplating a big breakfast of bacon and eggs, pancakes and fruit.But the young Army Air Corps aircraft mechanic didn't get breakfast that day, or lunch or dinner -- he was battling the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and Hickam Field, Dec. 7, 1941.Mr. Hamill, 75, said that all these years later, "I still can't believe it happened to us. We thought that if war broke out we were in the safest place, thousands of miles from anywhere."
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