Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHibernation
IN THE NEWS

Hibernation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Peter Jensen | February 26, 2005
TEMPERED GLASS reveals a deep pool of water, clear and blue. Suddenly, a flash of white, an explosion of bubbles and Alaska, a quarter-ton female polar bear, is swimming inches away. She glides to the bottom, picks up a log and rises to the surface. Wow. If the rest of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is anything like this, you find yourself saying, this is going to be one terrific place. On Tuesday, Baltimore's zoo reopens after a two-month hibernation from the public. The time off helped workers concentrate on maintenance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Biologists from Maryland's Department of Natural Resources got to hold some cute bear cubs Monday. But it was more than just an opportunity to see the state's wildlife up close. DNR's Wildlife and Heritage Service used the winter check-up to "keep an eye on the size and health of Maryland's bruin population," said DNR spokeswoman Candus Thomson . Staff ventured into the woods Monday, while sows and bears were still located in their dens, Thomson said. The exercise allowed biologists "to change the batteries in radio collars worn by some sows and tag the new cubs with microchips, so they can be scanned in subsequent years without disturbing their hibernation.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
White-nose syndrome, a deadly fungal infection that has devastated bat populations in New York and New England in the past two years, has now spread to three states on Maryland's borders - and seems poised to strike here next, biologists say. "We are surrounded on all sides," said Aimee Haskew, a faculty research assistant at the University of Maryland's Appalachian Lab in Frostburg. "It's like a guillotine hanging above your neck." An outbreak here could destroy one of the largest hibernating populations surviving in the East of the globally rare Eastern small-footed myotis and gradually wipe out larger bat populations that help to control Maryland's insect pests.
FEATURES
For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Stink bugs are starting to gather on my screens and I know they are looking to get inside and escape the cooler weather. What can I do to keep them out? University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp says scientists are expecting this to be a banner fall for stink bugs - the worst since they began to appear in 2010. Homeowners are likely to see them hanging on screens, curtains and lampshades inside the home in the weeks ahead. The stink bugs are searching for high energy foods to store before hibernation, but as those food sources dry up and daylight hours wane, they will search for a place to over-winter.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 18, 2000
I'VE BEEN SUMMONED from bed on these dank and moody March mornings by the urge to travel. It's a funny time of the year when from day to day, I can never tell what the temperature will be at the hour when the morning paper has yet to be delivered and the only clear sound I can distinguish is the distant wail of a coal train working hard to clear the hill toward the Clifton Park flatlands. Now that winter is history, I can't resist exiting a warm bed and stretching legs -- either on a 6: 45 walk around the neighborhood or a trek to work with a couple of totally unnecessary side trips added to make the effort more interesting.
FEATURES
For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Stink bugs are starting to gather on my screens and I know they are looking to get inside and escape the cooler weather. What can I do to keep them out? University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp says scientists are expecting this to be a banner fall for stink bugs - the worst since they began to appear in 2010. Homeowners are likely to see them hanging on screens, curtains and lampshades inside the home in the weeks ahead. The stink bugs are searching for high energy foods to store before hibernation, but as those food sources dry up and daylight hours wane, they will search for a place to over-winter.
NEWS
By PEG ADAMARCZYK | July 7, 1995
Those summer hibernation days are back again.I must admit, though, this year's excuse for hiding in air-conditioned splendor is a little different: We're keeping dry.People aren't tanning, they're rusting. And just about everything, whether it is supposed to be damp or not, has that clammy feel.*You can think quiet, cool thoughts at the monthly meeting of the Pasadena Sportfishing Group at 7:30 p.m. Monday at Orchard Beach fire hall, 7549 Solley Road.The agenda for Monday's meeting will be varied, said George Bentz, group spokesman.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 2, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - Why groundhogs bother to get up at all today - on Groundhog Day - has, until now, stood as one of those insoluble mysteries of science. Year after year, they rouse from a deep hibernation at this time of winter, still a month away from mating season and with absolutely nothing around for them to eat. Scientists, being naturally skeptical, don't think they do it just to help humans determine when spring is coming. In fact, new research indicates groundhogs emerge from their holes, like so many single people on a Friday night, to check out the dating scene.
NEWS
By MAUREEN RICE | May 25, 1993
Sometimes you just can't win for losing. But then again, sometimes you do win, so it makes the whole game worthwhile.For example, there are the groundhogs that happily eluded my dog all last summer. (I'm not at all sure the dog would have known what to do if she caught one, but she tried). They ate all the fruit off my trees, dug holes in every conceivable spot except where I might have chosen to plant something and, to crown it all, stared blatantly in our windows each evening as we ate our dinner.
FEATURES
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | February 13, 1991
AT AGE 52 and after 26 years of marriage, Irvin Johnson Jr. finally sent his wife a valentine.The sonnet was not a frilly, poetic pledge of love, nor was it neatly written on a Cupid-laden card. It was a simple note that was scribbled in pencil within the boundaries of a mimeographed guide supplied by the Learning Bank, an adult literacy program in Southwest Baltimore."Just a few lines to lit you know how much I love you," said the first letter Johnson has ever written. "I want to thank you for 26 wonderful years and three wonderfull children."
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 10, 2010
Biologists have found what they believe is the first evidence that Maryland bats are now infected with white nose syndrome, a deadly fungal disease that has killed more than a million hibernating bats since 2006, devastating colonies from New England to Virginia. A state biologist conducting a bat survey last Friday found dead and weakened bats in a cave on private property near Cumberland, the Department of Natural Resources reported Wednesday. About three-quarters of the winged mammals had the tell-tale white fungus on their muzzles and other exposed skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
The fall Maryland Home, Garden & Living Show is traditionally about getting the home and garden ready for winter, the season of hibernation. How perfect, then, to feature "man caves" - comfy, cozy spaces designed with the hibernating male in mind. Three interior designers were asked to choose a Maryland man of distinction as inspiration for the design of a man cave. Paula Henry chose baseball icon Cal Ripken Jr.; Laura Kimball chose author Edgar Allan Poe; and Karen Walters chose filmmaker John Waters.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
White-nose syndrome, a deadly fungal infection that has devastated bat populations in New York and New England in the past two years, has now spread to three states on Maryland's borders - and seems poised to strike here next, biologists say. "We are surrounded on all sides," said Aimee Haskew, a faculty research assistant at the University of Maryland's Appalachian Lab in Frostburg. "It's like a guillotine hanging above your neck." An outbreak here could destroy one of the largest hibernating populations surviving in the East of the globally rare Eastern small-footed myotis and gradually wipe out larger bat populations that help to control Maryland's insect pests.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE and CHARLES JAFFE,MARKETWATCH | March 25, 2008
When the stock market goes through a crisis in confidence, so do ordinary investors. It's hard to have much faith in a financial plan when all of the news is bad. The standard advice is "Hang on, for dear life," which is the hardest advice to follow at a time when your investment mettle is being tested. While trading in and out of funds is frequently a recipe for disaster, there are moves that investors can make to improve their confidence and portfolio without blowing up the long-term returns that they supposedly surrender by giving up on a fund.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2007
When ground squirrels, groundhogs and bears hibernate, their heart and respiration rates drop to help them survive. Now scientists are asking whether humans can pull the same trick. Some researchers believe the ability to hibernate is buried in our genetic code, and they're searching for ways to turn it on occasionally. The goal: to put seriously injured people into a form of suspended animation, or a hibernation-like state, to stave off the infections, brain damage and organ failure that often accompany severe bleeding.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | March 21, 2007
When Johns Hopkins routed Syracuse, 17-9, on Saturday, it wasn't just an impressive win for the Blue Jays, but also a wake-up call for the rest of college men's lacrosse. If Hopkins' offense continues to develop and the Blue Jays can find a defenseman who can match up with an opponent's top scorer, they are going to be extremely tough to beat. No. 3 Hopkins (4-1) has a dominant offense, and it was only a matter of time before the Blue Jays unleashed it. They scored only nine goals in a win over Hofstra and seven in a double-overtime victory over Princeton.
NEWS
By TINA HESMAN and TINA HESMAN,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 10, 2006
Hummingbirds do it. Bears do it. Even whistle pigs do it. So why don't we do it? That's the question scientists who study hibernation are asking. If humans could hibernate, or at least harness the power of torpor (as scientists call the dormant drowse), conditions such as sudden infant death syndrome, obesity and diabetes might be a thing of the past. Researchers hope that studies of hibernators also may aid trauma victims, help preserve transplant organs, lead to safer weight-loss treatments and blood-thinning agents, and shed light on some of the most basic, but still mysterious, processes in the body.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1991, Washington Post Writers Group | February 24, 1991
New YorkMemo to consumers bilked by deceptive advertising: It's time to put the Federal Trade Commission back in your Rolodex. If you complain, the commission might actually listen.The FTC's job is to pursue deception and fraud. During the Reagan years, however, the commission all but went out of business. One reason you see so many unsubstantiated health and environmental claims on products is that few national efforts have been made to tell advertisers no.Happily, the climate has changed.
NEWS
By TINA HESMAN and TINA HESMAN,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 10, 2006
Hummingbirds do it. Bears do it. Even whistle pigs do it. So why don't we do it? That's the question scientists who study hibernation are asking. If humans could hibernate, or at least harness the power of torpor (as scientists call the dormant drowse), conditions such as sudden infant death syndrome, obesity and diabetes might be a thing of the past. Researchers hope that studies of hibernators also may aid trauma victims, help preserve transplant organs, lead to safer weight-loss treatments and blood-thinning agents, and shed light on some of the most basic, but still mysterious, processes in the body.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen | February 26, 2005
TEMPERED GLASS reveals a deep pool of water, clear and blue. Suddenly, a flash of white, an explosion of bubbles and Alaska, a quarter-ton female polar bear, is swimming inches away. She glides to the bottom, picks up a log and rises to the surface. Wow. If the rest of the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore is anything like this, you find yourself saying, this is going to be one terrific place. On Tuesday, Baltimore's zoo reopens after a two-month hibernation from the public. The time off helped workers concentrate on maintenance.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.