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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun staff | November 23, 1997
"Lucky You," by Carl Hiaasen. Knopf. 368 pages. $24.Lucky us.Carl Hiaasen has written a new novel, his seventh as a solo act. It has all the now-familiar hallmarks of a Hiaasen novel - a fallen journalist hero, a woman as sensible as she is beautiful, a villian with something inorganic attached to his body. And, above all, it has a fierce love for Florida and utter contempt for its despoilers.In lesser hands, this would be a polemic, and a dreary, formulaic one at that. But Hiaasen is working from a recipe, a delicious one that only a choice few can whip up. (Think Elmore Leonard, or Donald Westlake.
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NEWS
November 25, 2007
Nature Girl By Carl Hiaasen This latest Hiaasen romp is set in the Florida beyond Miami and Disney World, where people like Honey Santana and half-Seminole Sammy Tigertail live quiet, peculiar existences. Night telemarketer Boyd Shreave has insulted Honey with a real estate phone pitch, and she plots a bizarre revenge that brings the three characters together. Hiaasen's humorous touches and his all-too-human characters carry the book to its satisfying close.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
The most entertaining novel this month is Carl Hiaasen's Basket Case (Knopf, 318 pages, $25.95), a devastatingly funny look at a middle-aged newspaperman's effort to escape a dead-end job. Indeed, there is so little life remaining in the reporter's career that he has been exiled to the Obituary Page, where he struggles to tell the stories of the worthy dead in his Florida town. But just when he's run out of nice things to say about the latest "stiff" -- a hang-gliding septuagenarian -- he gets the chance to make real headlines investigating the suspicious death of a forgotten rock star.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | April 28, 2007
The Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association has named The Sun Newspaper of the Year for work published in 2006. The Sun received the same award a year ago. The honor, announced yesterday at the conclusion of the association's two-day annual conference in Ellicott City, was in the category of largest daily papers, those with circulations of more than 75,000. In that group, The Sun came out ahead of The Washington Post, The Washington Times and The News Journal of Wilmington, Del. The Sun won 32 awards, 18 of them first-place prizes, in the contest's 37 categories.
FEATURES
By LUAINE LEE and LUAINE LEE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 5, 2006
LOS ANGELES-- --There's no doubt about it, novelist-journalist Carl Hiaasen writes about weirdoes. His books Strip Tease, Stormy Weather and Lucky You are packed with bizarre characters: a petty crook who fences hot wheelchairs, a 7-foot hit man, a guy who has a weed whacker surgically attached to his arm. "Growing up and working in Florida, the material is so rich," says Hiaasen, seated at a table in an empty hotel room here. "You can only put so much in the newspaper; in the meantime you have all this overflow, this great material, this great inspiration, and what better place to put it than in a novel?
NEWS
November 25, 2007
Nature Girl By Carl Hiaasen This latest Hiaasen romp is set in the Florida beyond Miami and Disney World, where people like Honey Santana and half-Seminole Sammy Tigertail live quiet, peculiar existences. Night telemarketer Boyd Shreave has insulted Honey with a real estate phone pitch, and she plots a bizarre revenge that brings the three characters together. Hiaasen's humorous touches and his all-too-human characters carry the book to its satisfying close.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
I talked with Rob Hiaasen on the phone the other day. Naturally, I was surprised to speak with Rob Hiaasen on the phone. Surprised because I, Rob Hiaasen, thought I, Rob Hiaasen, was the only Rob Hiaasen on Earth. (Don't we all think we're the only ones in the universe?) My discovery -- which may rank with the recent DNA-sequencing discovery as the two single greatest accomplishments of the new century -- began as all cosmic breakthroughs do: simply, serendipitously. I, Rob Hiaasen, was performing a search on Yahoo, an Internet service that, among other neat things, can find anyone if this anyone has a listed phone number.
FEATURES
November 5, 2005
For many men, the garage is a holy place -- it's their sanctuary, their place for their stuff. To examine this phenomenon, we'd like your help. Tell us about your garage -- or show us, if you can. Send an e-mail to rob.hiaasen@baltsun. com, or write to: Rob Hiaasen, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278. Please include your full name, address and phone number. And maybe we'll be by to check out your garage.
NEWS
By Gary Dretzka, and Gary Dretzka,,Chicago Tribune | August 20, 1995
"Stormy Weather," by Carl Hiaasen. New York: Knopf. 352 pages. $24 Anyone who remembers the devastation caused by Hurricane Andrew also might recall that the tragedy was compounded by carloads of thieves and con artists who arrived in the storm's wake. Likewise, much of the damage to structures resulted from shortcuts taken by contractors and inspectors who allowed substandard construction on homes that were in Andrew's path.Mr. Hiaasen helped chronicle the calamity - both criminal and meteorological - for readers of the Miami Herald.
FEATURES
December 20, 1998
To: Nicole Kidman, actress; star of "To Die For" and now "The Blue Room," Broadway's hottest ticket, in which she plays five erotically charged roles, including teen hooker and politician's wife. ("Pure theatrical Viagra," hails the Daily Telegraph of London. Kidman, pop culture's icon-of-the-week, seemingly graces entire newsstands. She's everywhere - but in my life. Until now.)From: Rob Hiaasen, journalist, actor; played the lead in "Danny The Dark Green Dinosaur" in Mrs. Creasy's first-grade class; extra in the 1983 blockbuster "Jaws 3-D."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiassen and Rob Hiassen,Sun Reporter | September 11, 2006
From CBSNews.com: ?One of the questions everyone asks a new anchor is, ?What?s your sign off going to be?? Walter Cronkite had the most famous nightly farewell, ?And that?s the way it is.? Edward R. Murrow used, ?Good night and good luck.? ?Well, it?s a new era here at The CBS Evening News with Katie Couric and Katie thinks maybe you folks on the other side of the screen might have some good ideas for what her own sign-off should be. ?If nothing else, it will be a lot of fun reading your ideas and, who knows, maybe one will actually stick.
FEATURES
By LUAINE LEE and LUAINE LEE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 5, 2006
LOS ANGELES-- --There's no doubt about it, novelist-journalist Carl Hiaasen writes about weirdoes. His books Strip Tease, Stormy Weather and Lucky You are packed with bizarre characters: a petty crook who fences hot wheelchairs, a 7-foot hit man, a guy who has a weed whacker surgically attached to his arm. "Growing up and working in Florida, the material is so rich," says Hiaasen, seated at a table in an empty hotel room here. "You can only put so much in the newspaper; in the meantime you have all this overflow, this great material, this great inspiration, and what better place to put it than in a novel?
FEATURES
November 5, 2005
For many men, the garage is a holy place -- it's their sanctuary, their place for their stuff. To examine this phenomenon, we'd like your help. Tell us about your garage -- or show us, if you can. Send an e-mail to rob.hiaasen@baltsun. com, or write to: Rob Hiaasen, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278. Please include your full name, address and phone number. And maybe we'll be by to check out your garage.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | August 17, 2004
It's not about the money, but it's a little bit about the money. As you've heard, Michael Phelps' pursuit of seven gold medals ended yesterday when he took the bronze in the 200-meter freestyle event. The third-place finish apparently cost him a $1 million bonus from Speedo - a turn of events that makes a bronze medal look almost like chopped liver on Phelps' Olympic plate. If you're an agent, what do you tell a client after losing $1 million? "I would tell him that the $1 million bonus is not and should not be the issue," says Ron Shapiro, Cal Ripken's longtime agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2004
Skinny Dip, by Carl Hiaasen. Knopf. 354 pages. $24.95 It serves up tidbits like these: A hairy goon takes a beating from an elderly cancer patient, a biologist hates the outdoors, and a woman's parents die when a bear takes control of their airplane and crashes it. Carl Hiaasen's latest novel is worth picking up if only to delight in these situations. Like many of Hiaasen's 10 previous novels, Skinny Dip falls into the unlikely genre of lighthearted humor thriller. Hiaasen - a former reporter and current columnist for the Miami Herald - often mines his detailed knowledge of Florida for settings, and, he claims, for his bizarre and quirky characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
The most entertaining novel this month is Carl Hiaasen's Basket Case (Knopf, 318 pages, $25.95), a devastatingly funny look at a middle-aged newspaperman's effort to escape a dead-end job. Indeed, there is so little life remaining in the reporter's career that he has been exiled to the Obituary Page, where he struggles to tell the stories of the worthy dead in his Florida town. But just when he's run out of nice things to say about the latest "stiff" -- a hang-gliding septuagenarian -- he gets the chance to make real headlines investigating the suspicious death of a forgotten rock star.
FEATURES
March 25, 1998
For a story on small-town newspapers and their surviving quirks and charms, we would appreciate hearing from readers kind enough to send us copies of their home-town newspapers. The smaller, the better.Please mail the newspapers to Rob Hiaasen, Features Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278.Pub Date: 3/25/98
NEWS
September 17, 2000
State regulators need more resources to combat pollution While it was heartening to hear Gov. Parris N. Glendening acknowledge that the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) was less than effective in responding to last weekend's spill of 10 million gallons of untreated sewage into Colgate Creek, understanding the implications of the incident requires a deeper look ("Public not told of spill for days," Sept. 12). The Bethlehem Steel plant at Sparrows Point is among the top 50 dischargers of toxic metals into the nation's surface waters.
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