Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHgs
IN THE NEWS

Hgs

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
Human Genome Sciences Inc. outlined plans yesterday for taking its lupus drug LymphoStat-B into the final phase of clinical trials before year-end, putting it among a handful of so-called "genomics" drugs to reach that stage. If successful, the drug would be the first lupus treatment approved in 40 years. It's "a critically important step in the evolution of HGS," Chief Executive Officer H. Thomas Watkins said during a conference call yesterday. The 14-year-old company has struggled for years to profit from genetic information, beginning as a research and discovery business and transitioning into drug development.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Human Genome Sciences Inc. reported clinical trial data yesterday showing that Albuferon, a hepatitis C drug the Rockville biotech is developing, is comparable to a current therapy and may do less damage to patients' quality of life during treatment. It also had a benefit of particular interest in the United States, where a large percentage of patients are overweight: The drug appeared to work better in heavier people than its alternative, a drug called Pegasys made by Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. But Albuferon, one of two drugs the company is relying on for eventual revenue, also had higher rates of patient discontinuation because of adverse events - particularly at the higher dosing levels.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
Human Genome Sciences Inc. of Rockville said yesterday that it has agreed to license the rights to sell future HGS products in Japan to Takeda Chemical Industries Ltd. in exchange for $5 million and a future royalty stream.Human Genome spokeswoman Nancy Broadbent said the products involved have not begun clinical trials. That means they probably are years away from government marketing approval.The deal also provides that Human Genome Sciences will obtain U.S. marketing rights to products that Takeda develops based on the Maryland company's gene sequencing research.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
Human Genome Sciences Inc. outlined plans yesterday for taking its lupus drug LymphoStat-B into the final phase of clinical trials before year-end, putting it among a handful of so-called "genomics" drugs to reach that stage. If successful, the drug would be the first lupus treatment approved in 40 years. It's "a critically important step in the evolution of HGS," Chief Executive Officer H. Thomas Watkins said during a conference call yesterday. The 14-year-old company has struggled for years to profit from genetic information, beginning as a research and discovery business and transitioning into drug development.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Human Genome Sciences has an enviable $1.55 billion in cash, but as the company released its third-quarter earnings report yesterday, its executives once again were dogged by questions about how long even that amount will last. The reasons: The Rockville-based company is spending heavily to develop eight drugs in clinical trials; simultaneously, it has acquired or is constructing buildings for research, administration and manufacturing, requiring it to set aside a growing amount of its cash as collateral for the off-balance-sheet borrowings that back them.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1995
Human Genome Sciences Inc. hired a drug company executive as its first president and chief operating officer yesterday and handed him one of the biotechnology company's most baffling puzzles -- how to turn important genetic discoveries into profitable products.The new president is Melvin D. Booth, 50, an accountant and executive who worked for 20 years for Palo Alto, Calif.-based Syntex Corp., most recently as president of Syntex Laboratories Inc. He also has been president of Syntex Pharmaceuticals Pacific, president of Syntex Canada and president of Syntex Dental Products Inc.At Rockville-based HGS, which has 175 employees, he will work under William A. Haseltine, the company's founder, chairman and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
Breaking off a historic alliance between a biotech start-up and a basic research foundation, Human Genome Sciences Inc. and The Institute of Genomics Research (TIGR) yesterday ended a 5-year relationship in which Human Genome tried to invent new drugs based on TIGR's cutting-edge work in determining the basic structure of human genes.The deal saves Human Genome $38.2 million it would have owed TIGR for future research, and gives the nonprofit TIGR the freedom to pursue other funding, and to publish its research more quickly.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
Human Genome Sciences Inc. said yesterday that its first-quarter loss narrowed despite increased operating expenses and flat revenue, thanks to one-time expenses that inflated its loss a year ago. The Rockville-based developer of gene-based drugs reported a quarterly loss of $13 million, or 10 cents a share, compared with a loss of $72.5 million, or 70 cents a share, in the first quarter last year. Revenue was $5.3 million, even with the 2000 quarter. Revenue from a year ago was restated to comply with a change in accounting rules.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1997
Human Genome Sciences Inc. announced yesterday that it has determined the genomic code of a bacteria that is the third leading cause of infection in hospitals.The Rockville genomics company said it hopes to strike research collaborations with other companies to develop antibiotics or other treatments to fight the bacteria, Enterococcus faecalis.The organism is normally found in the intestines, but increasingly is causing urinary tract, surgical wound and abdominal infections during hospitalization.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
Human Genome Sciences Inc. said yesterday that it would spin off its CoGenesys division as an independent company that will focus on the early development of the Rockville biotech's gene-based research and leave the commercialization of later-stage products already in clinical development to the parent company. Human Genome plans to lend CoGenesys $10 million as startup money, but the move to create two companies is still contingent on CoGenesys finding investors and partners to fund the new company by May 31. Craig A. Rosen, Human Genome's president and chief scientific officer, will become CoGenesys' executive chairman and chief scientific officer.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Human Genome Sciences Inc. yesterday announced a $507 million collaboration with Switzerland's Novartis to develop and commercialize the Rockville biotech's hepatitis C drug, Albuferon. The announcement jolted trading of Human Genome's stock, with shares moving at more than five times the normal volume. Shares rose 41 cents, or 4 percent, to close at $10.60 on the Nasdaq yesterday. Such partnerships are becoming more common in the drug development world. Smaller biotech concerns are often idea-rich, but cash-poor, while big pharmaceutical companies are often in the opposite camp, looking to partner with others to further their drug portfolio.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
Human Genome Sciences Inc. said yesterday that it would spin off its CoGenesys division as an independent company that will focus on the early development of the Rockville biotech's gene-based research and leave the commercialization of later-stage products already in clinical development to the parent company. Human Genome plans to lend CoGenesys $10 million as startup money, but the move to create two companies is still contingent on CoGenesys finding investors and partners to fund the new company by May 31. Craig A. Rosen, Human Genome's president and chief scientific officer, will become CoGenesys' executive chairman and chief scientific officer.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
Human Genome Sciences Inc. has licensed an experimental diabetes drug to industry giant GlaxoSmithKline PLC in a deal that could bring in as much as $183 million long-term for the Rockville-based biotechnology company. Separately yesterday, Human Genome announced a third-quarter net loss of $62.2 million, or 48 cents a share, which was roughly in line with expectations. The company's shares climbed 26 cents, or about 2.7 percent, to close at $9.75. For Human Genome, struggling to make the transition from selling genetic research to developing drugs based on that research, the licensing agreement could generate tens of millions in proceeds for a drug that, despite its promise, was years away from reaching the market, assuming HGS could have gotten it to market.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Human Genome Sciences has an enviable $1.55 billion in cash, but as the company released its third-quarter earnings report yesterday, its executives once again were dogged by questions about how long even that amount will last. The reasons: The Rockville-based company is spending heavily to develop eight drugs in clinical trials; simultaneously, it has acquired or is constructing buildings for research, administration and manufacturing, requiring it to set aside a growing amount of its cash as collateral for the off-balance-sheet borrowings that back them.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
Human Genome Sciences broke ground yesterday on the $250 million first phase of its new headquarters campus in Rockville. The three-building first phase of the headquarters campus will offer nearly 482,000 square feet, a parking garage and landscaping improvements. One building will be for corporate staff, while two others will be for research and development. Eventually, four additional buildings and one more parking garage may be built. The company said it intends to finance the project with the help of the state and its development agency.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
Human Genome Sciences Inc. said yesterday that its first-quarter loss narrowed despite increased operating expenses and flat revenue, thanks to one-time expenses that inflated its loss a year ago. The Rockville-based developer of gene-based drugs reported a quarterly loss of $13 million, or 10 cents a share, compared with a loss of $72.5 million, or 70 cents a share, in the first quarter last year. Revenue was $5.3 million, even with the 2000 quarter. Revenue from a year ago was restated to comply with a change in accounting rules.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Human Genome Sciences Inc. reported clinical trial data yesterday showing that Albuferon, a hepatitis C drug the Rockville biotech is developing, is comparable to a current therapy and may do less damage to patients' quality of life during treatment. It also had a benefit of particular interest in the United States, where a large percentage of patients are overweight: The drug appeared to work better in heavier people than its alternative, a drug called Pegasys made by Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. But Albuferon, one of two drugs the company is relying on for eventual revenue, also had higher rates of patient discontinuation because of adverse events - particularly at the higher dosing levels.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Human Genome Sciences Inc. yesterday announced a $507 million collaboration with Switzerland's Novartis to develop and commercialize the Rockville biotech's hepatitis C drug, Albuferon. The announcement jolted trading of Human Genome's stock, with shares moving at more than five times the normal volume. Shares rose 41 cents, or 4 percent, to close at $10.60 on the Nasdaq yesterday. Such partnerships are becoming more common in the drug development world. Smaller biotech concerns are often idea-rich, but cash-poor, while big pharmaceutical companies are often in the opposite camp, looking to partner with others to further their drug portfolio.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2000
Human Genome Sciences Inc. announced yesterday that it had paid about $120 million in stock for a company with rights to a technology designed to make protein drugs last longer in the body, potentially reducing dosages for patients. Human Genome's announcement that it had acquired Principia Pharmaceutical Corp., a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Norristown, Pa., comes as it makes significant progress in moving the first of its experimental gene-based drugs through development.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2000
Shares in Human Genome Sciences Inc. rose 9.3 percent yesterday after the company announced that it is ready to start human clinical trials of a drug to treat immune system disorders. The Rockville-based company made the announcement at 4:15 a.m. yesterday, prompting heavy trading in the early morning hours that drove the share price to as high as $150. It closed at $145.375, up $12.375. The company said the announcement was made at such an unusual hour to make newspapers' Internet editions.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.