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Hexavalent Chromium

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NEWS
December 6, 2013
The recent commentary concerning Harbor Point and the hexavalent chromium clearly describes the potential harm to the surrounding residents, but there is another issue that should be of a greater concern ("Harbor Point environmental questions," Dec. 2). The single monitoring well in Back Bay at the Living Classroom Foundation campus, just north of the Harbor Point site, has at least 40,000 times the concentration of hexavalent chromium that is penetrating the surrounding soil.
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NEWS
December 8, 2013
The recent commentary, "Harbor Point environmental questions," (Dec. 2), may lead The Sun's readers to believe that additional studies are necessary before work can begin on the proposed redevelopment there. In fact, these suggested studies have nothing to with the proposed redevelopment, which the authors recognize will be safe. "We are not saying that development of this site will result in meaningful human health and/or ecological risks," the authors state. It also is important to note that the federal consent decree for the cleanup of the former Baltimore Works site mandates that construction not jeopardize the integrity of the remedy and that detailed plans be approved by federal and state agencies.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
A public meeting on environmental safeguards for redeveloping a Fells Point former factory site has been reset for Nov. 14, Baltimore City Council member James B. Kraft has announced. The meeting on the Harbor Point project is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, which was postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
NEWS
December 6, 2013
The recent commentary concerning Harbor Point and the hexavalent chromium clearly describes the potential harm to the surrounding residents, but there is another issue that should be of a greater concern ("Harbor Point environmental questions," Dec. 2). The single monitoring well in Back Bay at the Living Classroom Foundation campus, just north of the Harbor Point site, has at least 40,000 times the concentration of hexavalent chromium that is penetrating the surrounding soil.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 14, 2013
A public meeting tonight (Thursday) will give city residents a chance to ask questions about environmental safeguards for developing Harbor Point, a former factory site in Fells Point where toxic chromium remains entombed underground. The meeting , arranged by Councilman James B. Kraft, is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
NEWS
December 8, 2013
The recent commentary, "Harbor Point environmental questions," (Dec. 2), may lead The Sun's readers to believe that additional studies are necessary before work can begin on the proposed redevelopment there. In fact, these suggested studies have nothing to with the proposed redevelopment, which the authors recognize will be safe. "We are not saying that development of this site will result in meaningful human health and/or ecological risks," the authors state. It also is important to note that the federal consent decree for the cleanup of the former Baltimore Works site mandates that construction not jeopardize the integrity of the remedy and that detailed plans be approved by federal and state agencies.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Plans to build offices and condominiums at Harbor Point hit a new snag Friday as federal and state regulators rejected the developer's plans for protecting the public from toxic contamination in the ground during construction at the former factory site. The Environmental Protection Agency and Maryland Department of the Environment called for many minor revisions to the Beatty Development Group's plan, which an EPA spokeswoman characterized as largely routine, with "no showstoppers.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
Allied-Signal Inc., which is spending up to $100 million to clean its old chrome chemical works on Baltimore's waterfront, is lobbying regulators to relax rules on how much contaminated dirt must be removed from the site.No decision has been announced. But a Maryland environmental official says the soil cleanup requirement is likely to be eased, despite objections from environmentalists and from New Jersey officials, who have been dueling with Allied over cleaning up contaminated sites in that state.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Decades after first discovering the problem, state officials have settled on a $27 million plan to keep a cancer-causing chemical in the ground at the Dundalk Marine Terminal from seeping into the Patapsco River and blowing into nearby residential areas. Under the plan, Honeywell International Inc. and the Maryland Port Administration jointly pledged to re-line leaky storm drains beneath the state-owned shipping facility, which have run yellow at times with chromium-tainted water. They also vowed to see that pavement covering the contaminated soil remains intact so it can't become airborne.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
The developer planning to build a new waterfront headquarters for Exelon Corp. on the site of a former chromium-processing plant assured Fells Point-area residents Thursday night that the Harbor Point project could be built safely without releasing the highly contaminated soil and groundwater entombed beneath the site. Speaking to about 100 people gathered at the Morgan Stanley brokerage building at Harbor Point, representatives of Beatty Development Group outlined steps they would take to prevent hazardous dust from being kicked up when crews excavate through the clean soil and plastic capping the contamination and drive 1,100 pilings into the ground.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 14, 2013
A public meeting tonight (Thursday) will give city residents a chance to ask questions about environmental safeguards for developing Harbor Point, a former factory site in Fells Point where toxic chromium remains entombed underground. The meeting , arranged by Councilman James B. Kraft, is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
The developer planning to build a new waterfront headquarters for Exelon Corp. on the site of a former chromium-processing plant assured Fells Point-area residents Thursday night that the Harbor Point project could be built safely without releasing the highly contaminated soil and groundwater entombed beneath the site. Speaking to about 100 people gathered at the Morgan Stanley brokerage building at Harbor Point, representatives of Beatty Development Group outlined steps they would take to prevent hazardous dust from being kicked up when crews excavate through the clean soil and plastic capping the contamination and drive 1,100 pilings into the ground.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Plans to build offices and condominiums at Harbor Point hit a new snag Friday as federal and state regulators rejected the developer's plans for protecting the public from toxic contamination in the ground during construction at the former factory site. The Environmental Protection Agency and Maryland Department of the Environment called for many minor revisions to the Beatty Development Group's plan, which an EPA spokeswoman characterized as largely routine, with "no showstoppers.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
A public meeting on environmental safeguards for redeveloping a Fells Point former factory site has been reset for Nov. 14, Baltimore City Council member James B. Kraft has announced. The meeting on the Harbor Point project is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, which was postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Decades after first discovering the problem, state officials have settled on a $27 million plan to keep a cancer-causing chemical in the ground at the Dundalk Marine Terminal from seeping into the Patapsco River and blowing into nearby residential areas. Under the plan, Honeywell International Inc. and the Maryland Port Administration jointly pledged to re-line leaky storm drains beneath the state-owned shipping facility, which have run yellow at times with chromium-tainted water. They also vowed to see that pavement covering the contaminated soil remains intact so it can't become airborne.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
Allied-Signal Inc., which is spending up to $100 million to clean its old chrome chemical works on Baltimore's waterfront, is lobbying regulators to relax rules on how much contaminated dirt must be removed from the site.No decision has been announced. But a Maryland environmental official says the soil cleanup requirement is likely to be eased, despite objections from environmentalists and from New Jersey officials, who have been dueling with Allied over cleaning up contaminated sites in that state.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Edward Gunts and Timothy B. Wheeler and Edward Gunts,Staff Writers | May 18, 1992
Building by building, the old Allied chrome works on Baltimore's waterfront is disappearing, as moon-suited workers carefully dismantle and decontaminate the 147-year-old plant from the inside out.Now, with the massive six-year cleanup of one of the state's biggest hazardous waste headaches nearing the midway point, the owner of the old plant is jockeying to cash in on its valuable location near the Inner Harbor, once the toxic chrome dust that riddles the...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Edward Gunts and Timothy B. Wheeler and Edward Gunts,Staff Writers | May 18, 1992
Building by building, the old Allied chrome works on Baltimore's waterfront is disappearing, as moon-suited workers carefully dismantle and decontaminate the 147-year-old plant from the inside out.Now, with the massive six-year cleanup of one of the state's biggest hazardous waste headaches nearing the midway point, the owner of the old plant is jockeying to cash in on its valuable location near the Inner Harbor, once the toxic chrome dust that riddles the...
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