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BUSINESS
November 7, 2004
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Monday Treasury bill auction Earnings reports: Conseco, Midway Games, Six Flags Tuesday Earnings reports: CenterPoint, EchoStar, Hospira, Marsh & McLennan, May Stores, Abercrombie, Gemstar-TV Guide, La-Z-Boy Wednesday Fed meeting on interest rates September international trade report Weekly jobless claims Freddie Mac mortgage rate report Earnings reports: Aramark, Federated Stores, Ann Taylor, Starbucks,...
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BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 3, 2009
You leave your job, and then face the question of what to do with your 401(k). If you're like 46 percent of workers, you will cash out the account even though this money is meant for retirement. That figure comes from a survey by benefits consultant Hewitt Associates, which looked at 170,000 workers who left their job last year. The high percentage of cash outs remains much the same since 2005, Hewitt says, despite increased efforts to warn workers about the financial damage they are doing to themselves.
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BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 23, 2006
Business owner John Wagner is thinking hard about establishing health savings accounts for himself and the roughly 50 workers for whom he provides medical insurance. The accounts, created in 2003 by the Bush administration, allow employees or individuals to save money in tax-advantaged investment vehicles for routine health needs not covered by accompanying high-deductible insurance plans. Contributions to HSAs are tax deductible, and withdrawals are tax free if used for qualified medical expenses.
BUSINESS
By Andrea Coombes and Andrea Coombes,MarketWatch | January 2, 2008
Being a worker isn't getting any easier. We're moving from traditional pensions to 401(k)s, full-scale health insurance to consumer-driven health plans and steady annual salary increases to one-time "pay for performance" bonuses and incentives. Base salaries are expected to increase about 3.9 percent on average in 2008, matching the average pay increase in 2007, according to a Towers Perrin survey of about 4,000 companies worldwide. Those results match a number of other salary-expectation surveys.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | November 28, 2004
THIS WEEK marks the third anniversary of Enron Corp.'s bankruptcy filing. As was mentioned at the first anniversary and at the second, the greatest scene of this tragedy stands behind the curtain, waiting to appall us again and again. Thousands of Enron employees lost more than $1 billion when Enron stock in their retirement accounts evaporated. Frantic discussions about the foolishness of employees owning stock in their employer ensued. Members of Congress threatened to outlaw the common practice of companies restricting the ability of employees to switch out of company stock awarded to 401(k)
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 5, 2001
WOULD you like more income without sacrificing safety? "The best deals for risk-averse investors are in high-quality corporate bonds," says Kevin Grant, manager, Fidelity Balanced Funds. "They pay about one percentage point more than Treasuries of similar maturity, and there's little chance that quality bond issuers will falter during a recession." AFTER SEPT. 11: "In mid-October, 81 percent of investors polled said they still planned to invest as they did before the terrorist attacks.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2003
The HR Team Inc. staff spent four hours in a spa. Buck Distributing Co. handed out Lenox china and cash. McCormick & Company Inc. is giving its thousands of employees a 12-day year-end vacation. Lucky, lucky workers. Gone are the days when Americans could count on their employer to give them something extra for the holidays. Two out of three U.S. organizations aren't giving bonuses this year, according to a survey by Hewitt Associates, an international human resources firm. No cash. No turkeys.
BUSINESS
By Andrea Coombes and Andrea Coombes,MarketWatch | January 2, 2008
Being a worker isn't getting any easier. We're moving from traditional pensions to 401(k)s, full-scale health insurance to consumer-driven health plans and steady annual salary increases to one-time "pay for performance" bonuses and incentives. Base salaries are expected to increase about 3.9 percent on average in 2008, matching the average pay increase in 2007, according to a Towers Perrin survey of about 4,000 companies worldwide. Those results match a number of other salary-expectation surveys.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | November 3, 2009
You leave your job, and then face the question of what to do with your 401(k). If you're like 46 percent of workers, you will cash out the account even though this money is meant for retirement. That figure comes from a survey by benefits consultant Hewitt Associates, which looked at 170,000 workers who left their job last year. The high percentage of cash outs remains much the same since 2005, Hewitt says, despite increased efforts to warn workers about the financial damage they are doing to themselves.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 23, 2006
Business owner John Wagner is thinking hard about establishing health savings accounts for himself and the roughly 50 workers for whom he provides medical insurance. The accounts, created in 2003 by the Bush administration, allow employees or individuals to save money in tax-advantaged investment vehicles for routine health needs not covered by accompanying high-deductible insurance plans. Contributions to HSAs are tax deductible, and withdrawals are tax free if used for qualified medical expenses.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | November 28, 2004
THIS WEEK marks the third anniversary of Enron Corp.'s bankruptcy filing. As was mentioned at the first anniversary and at the second, the greatest scene of this tragedy stands behind the curtain, waiting to appall us again and again. Thousands of Enron employees lost more than $1 billion when Enron stock in their retirement accounts evaporated. Frantic discussions about the foolishness of employees owning stock in their employer ensued. Members of Congress threatened to outlaw the common practice of companies restricting the ability of employees to switch out of company stock awarded to 401(k)
BUSINESS
November 7, 2004
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Monday Treasury bill auction Earnings reports: Conseco, Midway Games, Six Flags Tuesday Earnings reports: CenterPoint, EchoStar, Hospira, Marsh & McLennan, May Stores, Abercrombie, Gemstar-TV Guide, La-Z-Boy Wednesday Fed meeting on interest rates September international trade report Weekly jobless claims Freddie Mac mortgage rate report Earnings reports: Aramark, Federated Stores, Ann Taylor, Starbucks,...
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2003
The HR Team Inc. staff spent four hours in a spa. Buck Distributing Co. handed out Lenox china and cash. McCormick & Company Inc. is giving its thousands of employees a 12-day year-end vacation. Lucky, lucky workers. Gone are the days when Americans could count on their employer to give them something extra for the holidays. Two out of three U.S. organizations aren't giving bonuses this year, according to a survey by Hewitt Associates, an international human resources firm. No cash. No turkeys.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 5, 2001
WOULD you like more income without sacrificing safety? "The best deals for risk-averse investors are in high-quality corporate bonds," says Kevin Grant, manager, Fidelity Balanced Funds. "They pay about one percentage point more than Treasuries of similar maturity, and there's little chance that quality bond issuers will falter during a recession." AFTER SEPT. 11: "In mid-October, 81 percent of investors polled said they still planned to invest as they did before the terrorist attacks.
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