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By Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 18, 1998
National Rifle Association top gun Charlton Heston has Mike Wallace in his sights, and Wallace doesn't understand why.Wallace's profile of Heston will run Sunday on "60 Minutes." In Heston's column in the January issue of Guns & Ammo, he says the segment will probably follow "60's" "pattern of character assassination" and "SWAT-team journalism." Wallace, Heston writes, will do his best to "ambush" him. Only one problem,Wallace says. Heston hasn't seen the story."It's hilarious," says Wallace, en route to Chicago.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 7, 2008
Charlton Heston, who died Saturday at the age of 84, seemed to be built for the spectacles of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. He was never an athlete like Burt Lancaster, who took a pass on the role that made Heston a superstar, Ben-Hur. But no movie star ever looked like more of an athlete than Heston, with his comic-book wedge of a torso, his Dick Tracy-square jaw and the competitive glint in his eye, which also held signs of something deeper - a wounded masculinity. That's what made him shine in Ben-Hur.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
FAIRFAX, Va. - It takes something special to turn Tom Selleck into just another guy in the room and a bunch of Inside-the-Beltway hot shots into boys on the playground. What it takes is Charlton Heston and a glass case full of famous guns from Hollywood films and TV. Now 77, Heston doesn't project a man-of-action image anymore. And sometimes, you have to lean close to hear what he's saying. But make no mistake, he still parts a crowd the way his Moses parted the Red Sea. Heston was in Northern Virginia this week to open the National Firearms Museum's exhibit, "Real Guns of Reel Heroes."
FEATURES
October 4, 2007
84 Charlton Heston Actor 66 Anne Rice Author 46 Jon Secada Singer 40 Liev Schreiber Actor 31 Alicia Silverstone Actress
NEWS
June 9, 1998
THE NATIONAL Rifle Association has done itself a good turn by making Charlton Heston its president. Mr. Heston is a powerful actor who believes in the cause.Despite the stridence of what he said at the NRA's meeting in Philadelphia, Mr. Heston is a comparative moderate within the leadership of that organization. It fronts for the interests of gun manufacturers and distributors while purporting to speak for some 2.8 million hunting, target-shooting, farming, antique-collecting legitimate gun owners and enthusiasts.
FEATURES
October 4, 2007
84 Charlton Heston Actor 66 Anne Rice Author 46 Jon Secada Singer 40 Liev Schreiber Actor 31 Alicia Silverstone Actress
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 13, 1991
WBAL-TV will cancel the 5 o'clock newscast it has aired for the last six years and replace it with reruns of "The Golden Girls" and "Who's the Boss?" Sept. 2, the station announced yesterday.Channel 11 officials said yesterday that the cancellation will not result in newsroom layoffs and did not signal a cutback in commitment to news."We are expanding the half-hour of news at 6 to an hour and we are focusing all our [early news] resources into that," said station manager Joe Heston.Channel 11 is in last place at 5 p.m., trailing Channel 13's first-place lineup of "The Cosby Show" and "Night Court" reruns and Channel 2's newscast.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Televison Critic | October 5, 1990
WBAL-TV (Channel 11) has hired a new anchorwoman and shuffled its first-string lineup in a way that makes her almost as visible at the 11 o'clock anchor desk as Rod Daniels and Pat Minarcin. Carolyn McEnrue, 30, joined Channel 11 in September and is now anchoring the station's top newscast three nights a week -- Friday, Saturday and Sunday. (She also serves as a reporter on her non-anchor work days.)The Friday broadcast makes her more than a new weekend anchor. The pairing of her and Daniels on an expanded Sunday newscast is a dramatic change from the way local television news has traditionally been presented in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | May 9, 1991
ONCE AGAIN I know you'll think that I made this up -- but I didn't. It was in the newspapers.The U.S. Customs Service has banned the importation of toy M-16 rifles because they look so much like the real thing. Apparently, as far as the government is concerned, some authentic guns are not as much a threat to the citizenry as toy ones.The reason behind the ban is that the fake M-16 looks so real that police can't tell the difference. Officers have been shooting people carrying the toys. Also, fake guns are being used more and more in "armed" robberies by criminals who can't afford a real gun.Clyde Heston, president of the National Toy Gun Association and ZTC Charlton Heston's third cousin, was indignant over the Customs order.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | August 15, 2001
I'M SITTING in the movie theater, watching Underwear Boy pretend he's some kind of latter-day Charlton Heston. I let out a moan and mutter to myself, "Is there no end to the suffering of science-fiction fans?" The remake of the sci-fi classic Planet of the Apes continues to stink out theaters nationwide. OK, so it's not actually a remake. It's just director Tim Burton's vision of Pierre Boulle's novel of the same name. Burton probably figured he could make a better film. He figured wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 30, 2004
Some critics scoff at moviemakers who aim to be "timeless" and take refuge from contemporary chaos in fantasy and history. But writers and directors who train a piercing eye on the past often shed more light on today's news than filmmakers who tear their stories from the headlines. Take this scenario for a foreign misadventure movie: Once hailed for liberating an Islamic country from tyranny, a Western commander learns that a messianic extremist and his army have massacred thousands of troops and laid waste to native towns.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
FAIRFAX, Va. - It takes something special to turn Tom Selleck into just another guy in the room and a bunch of Inside-the-Beltway hot shots into boys on the playground. What it takes is Charlton Heston and a glass case full of famous guns from Hollywood films and TV. Now 77, Heston doesn't project a man-of-action image anymore. And sometimes, you have to lean close to hear what he's saying. But make no mistake, he still parts a crowd the way his Moses parted the Red Sea. Heston was in Northern Virginia this week to open the National Firearms Museum's exhibit, "Real Guns of Reel Heroes."
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | August 15, 2001
I'M SITTING in the movie theater, watching Underwear Boy pretend he's some kind of latter-day Charlton Heston. I let out a moan and mutter to myself, "Is there no end to the suffering of science-fiction fans?" The remake of the sci-fi classic Planet of the Apes continues to stink out theaters nationwide. OK, so it's not actually a remake. It's just director Tim Burton's vision of Pierre Boulle's novel of the same name. Burton probably figured he could make a better film. He figured wrong.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 27, 2000
BILL STRUEVER is Baltimore's big idea man when it comes to reusing old buildings, so I wouldn't presume to tell him what to do with Fort Carroll, now that he's taken a lease on the place and has ideas about buying it. But such dream-hatching is irresistible. Fort Carroll has been sitting out there, a long-abandoned, rat-infested, manmade island in the Patapsco River just south of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, waiting for a new life. Someone wanted to put a casino there once upon a time.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 6, 2000
IF CHARLTON Heston wrote an advice column: Dear Charlton: Please help! "Vivian," a very good friend of mine, is getting married. Naturally, I've been invited to the wedding. But the invitation makes no mention of bringing my long-time boyfriend, "Bob." "Vivian" knows "Bob" and I have been a couple for years. I am confused and disappointed. How should I handle this? -- Hurt in Houston Dear Hurt: My dear woman, your pain must be enormous. First things first: What kind of heat are you packing?
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
Forty-eight hours after one of the deadliest shooting sprees in American history, fortunes of pro-gun legislation in states across the country have radically reversed, and even the most unapologetic gun rights supporters are seeking to lower their profiles.Highlighting the trend, the National Rifle Association, known for its uncompromising support for the gun, retreated yesterday and announced -- after a sometimes bitter internal debate -- that it would dramatically scale back its annual convention next week in Denver.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 27, 2000
BILL STRUEVER is Baltimore's big idea man when it comes to reusing old buildings, so I wouldn't presume to tell him what to do with Fort Carroll, now that he's taken a lease on the place and has ideas about buying it. But such dream-hatching is irresistible. Fort Carroll has been sitting out there, a long-abandoned, rat-infested, manmade island in the Patapsco River just south of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, waiting for a new life. Someone wanted to put a casino there once upon a time.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
Forty-eight hours after one of the deadliest shooting sprees in American history, fortunes of pro-gun legislation in states across the country have radically reversed, and even the most unapologetic gun rights supporters are seeking to lower their profiles.Highlighting the trend, the National Rifle Association, known for its uncompromising support for the gun, retreated yesterday and announced -- after a sometimes bitter internal debate -- that it would dramatically scale back its annual convention next week in Denver.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 18, 1998
National Rifle Association top gun Charlton Heston has Mike Wallace in his sights, and Wallace doesn't understand why.Wallace's profile of Heston will run Sunday on "60 Minutes." In Heston's column in the January issue of Guns & Ammo, he says the segment will probably follow "60's" "pattern of character assassination" and "SWAT-team journalism." Wallace, Heston writes, will do his best to "ambush" him. Only one problem,Wallace says. Heston hasn't seen the story."It's hilarious," says Wallace, en route to Chicago.
NEWS
June 17, 1998
Why is heroin wrong but methadone right for our drug addicts?Thank you for your report ("Test of heroin maintenance may be launched in Baltimore," June 10). I found two statements particularly thought provoking.First, Dr. Sally Satel, a psychiatrist, said, questioning the claimed success of the Swiss experiment: "We're being presented with false choices."We are left to guess what the false choices are. She fails to tell us what she is questioning in the "claimed success" of the Swiss experiment or why. She does not tell us why it is all right to give addicts the powerfully addictive drug methadone, but wrong to give them heroin.
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