Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHeseltine
IN THE NEWS

Heseltine

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 25, 1990
LONDON -- Former Defense Minister Michael Heseltine picked up his first heavyweight support yesterday -- from other former Thatcher Cabinet members -- in the battle to succeed Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.But Mr. Heseltine still appeared short of winning a majority in Conservative Party voting this week.Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major, at 47 the youngest candidate, appeared to be closing fast on Mr. Heseltine, while Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd appeared to be trailing in the race toward Tuesday's crucial vote.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | June 12, 1994
LONDON -- The lion-maned Michael Heseltine would look good in a toga. He has the lean and hungry look of an ambitious Roman senator. Some say he also has the political instincts of, say, a Brutus.His political role seems innocuous enough. Mr. Heseltine is president of Britain's Board of Trade and Industry, a government post which makes him roughly the equivalent of the secretary of commerce in the United States.He's a great advocate of British competitiveness abroad and privatization at home.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 15, 1990
LONDON -- Former Defense Minister Michael Heseltine challenged Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher yesterday for leadership of Britain's Conservative Party and the country, throwing the entire political scene here into turmoil.He acted less than 24 hours after Mrs. Thatcher was subjected to a devastating attack in the House of Commons by her former deputy, Sir Geoffrey Howe, over her anti-European attitude."I am persuaded that I would have a better chance now, a better prospect now, than Mrs. Thatcher of leading the Conservatives into a fourth election victory, thus avoiding the ultimate calamity of a Labor government," Mr. Heseltine said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 28, 1990
LONDON -- John Major, the chancellor of the exchequer who rose out of one of London's toughest neighborhoods, took office today as Britain's prime minister.Major, 47, who had been Margaret Thatcher's chosen heir, arrived at Buckingham Palace where Thatcher formally presented her resignation to Queen Elizabeth II, who asked Major to form a new government.Major, whose father was a circus trapeze artist, was elected leader of the Conservative Party to replace Thatcher, whose resignation under pressure last week surprised the nation.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | June 12, 1994
LONDON -- The lion-maned Michael Heseltine would look good in a toga. He has the lean and hungry look of an ambitious Roman senator. Some say he also has the political instincts of, say, a Brutus.His political role seems innocuous enough. Mr. Heseltine is president of Britain's Board of Trade and Industry, a government post which makes him roughly the equivalent of the secretary of commerce in the United States.He's a great advocate of British competitiveness abroad and privatization at home.
NEWS
November 27, 1990
LONDON -- Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major was assured today of becoming Britain's next prime minister after both rivals in a Conservative Party leadership election conceded victory to him.Major won 185 votes, two less than the simple majority required for election. Former Defense Secretary Michael Heseltine had 131 votes; Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd had 56 votes.Hurd said that the party rules required a third ballot, even though he and Heseltine had conceded that Major would be the winner.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 16, 1990
LONDON -- Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, fighting for political survival, said yesterday she would continue leading "the only party with clear policies, resolutely carried out."Opinion polls gave conflicting signals yesterday on the challenge of former Defense Secretary Michael Heseltine to her leadership of the Conservative Party, and indirectly her leadership of the country.The polls suggested that the public would prefer Mr. Heseltine as Tory leader, but they also showed that she remained the favorite inside her party.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 28, 1990
LONDON -- John Major, the chancellor of the exchequer who rose out of one of London's toughest neighborhoods, took office today as Britain's prime minister.Major, 47, who had been Margaret Thatcher's chosen heir, arrived at Buckingham Palace where Thatcher formally presented her resignation to Queen Elizabeth II, who asked Major to form a new government.Major, whose father was a circus trapeze artist, was elected leader of the Conservative Party to replace Thatcher, whose resignation under pressure last week surprised the nation.
NEWS
November 17, 1990
If Margaret Thatcher is replaced as prime minister by Michael Heseltine, British support of U.S. policy in the Persian Gulf would not lessen.What would change is Britain's attitude toward Europe. Mrs. Thatcher has been a reluctant European, unhappy at German unification, dragging Britain's feet in monetary union, falling back on the rhetoric of nationalism whenever convenient. Mr. Heseltine, former cabinet member Sir Geoffrey Howe, other Conservative Party figures and business leaders believe Britain must join the parade to European unity lest it lose its dominant role in financial services to Paris and Frankfurt.
NEWS
By Judy Anderson and Judy Anderson,London Bureau of The Sun | November 20, 1990
LONDON -- By the end of today, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher could be on her way to being simply Margaret Thatcher, M.P. But, then, maybe not.The political future of Mrs. Thatcher, for more than a decade the dominating force in British politics, rests in the hands of 372 Conservative Party members of Parliament, who today vote on whether to keep her as leader of their party and, by implication, as prime minister of the United Kingdom.The choice is between Mrs. Thatcher and her former Cabinet minister, Michael Heseltine; between the familiar old and the flamboyant new; between the prime minister's combative attitude toward Europe and her challenger's more conciliatory approach.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 28, 1990
LONDON -- Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major was selected yesterday as the new Conservative Party leader and prime minister to succeed Margaret Thatcher, marking a change of both era and generation in British politics.Mr. Major, 47, fell two votes short of the 187-vote majority required for an outright victory in yesterday's balloting for the leadership of the Conservative Party, but his two opponents quickly conceded and pledged themselves to unity. He thus will become Britain's youngest prime minister since William Pitt the younger took office at the age of 24 in 1783.
NEWS
November 27, 1990
LONDON -- Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major was assured today of becoming Britain's next prime minister after both rivals in a Conservative Party leadership election conceded victory to him.Major won 185 votes, two less than the simple majority required for election. Former Defense Secretary Michael Heseltine had 131 votes; Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd had 56 votes.Hurd said that the party rules required a third ballot, even though he and Heseltine had conceded that Major would be the winner.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1990
LONDON -- The three candidates to succeed Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in today's ballot for leadership of this country and the Conservative Party all pledged yesterday to support the U.S.-led coalition in the gulf.Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd talked with Secretary of State James A. Baker III to throw his support behind the proposal to set a deadline for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. He has emphasized during the leadership campaign that the gulf crisis is entering a critical period and that he is best qualified to handle it.Michael Heseltine, a former defense secretary, said he would back a deadline if it were imposed by the United Nations, adding: "I have been, I think, amongst the foremost of Mrs. Thatcher's backbenchers to support the stand her government has taken in support of the international force."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 25, 1990
LONDON -- Former Defense Minister Michael Heseltine picked up his first heavyweight support yesterday -- from other former Thatcher Cabinet members -- in the battle to succeed Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.But Mr. Heseltine still appeared short of winning a majority in Conservative Party voting this week.Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major, at 47 the youngest candidate, appeared to be closing fast on Mr. Heseltine, while Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd appeared to be trailing in the race toward Tuesday's crucial vote.
NEWS
By Judy Anderson and Judy Anderson,London Bureau of The Sun | November 20, 1990
LONDON -- By the end of today, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher could be on her way to being simply Margaret Thatcher, M.P. But, then, maybe not.The political future of Mrs. Thatcher, for more than a decade the dominating force in British politics, rests in the hands of 372 Conservative Party members of Parliament, who today vote on whether to keep her as leader of their party and, by implication, as prime minister of the United Kingdom.The choice is between Mrs. Thatcher and her former Cabinet minister, Michael Heseltine; between the familiar old and the flamboyant new; between the prime minister's combative attitude toward Europe and her challenger's more conciliatory approach.
NEWS
November 17, 1990
If Margaret Thatcher is replaced as prime minister by Michael Heseltine, British support of U.S. policy in the Persian Gulf would not lessen.What would change is Britain's attitude toward Europe. Mrs. Thatcher has been a reluctant European, unhappy at German unification, dragging Britain's feet in monetary union, falling back on the rhetoric of nationalism whenever convenient. Mr. Heseltine, former cabinet member Sir Geoffrey Howe, other Conservative Party figures and business leaders believe Britain must join the parade to European unity lest it lose its dominant role in financial services to Paris and Frankfurt.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1990
LONDON -- The three candidates to succeed Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in today's ballot for leadership of this country and the Conservative Party all pledged yesterday to support the U.S.-led coalition in the gulf.Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd talked with Secretary of State James A. Baker III to throw his support behind the proposal to set a deadline for Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. He has emphasized during the leadership campaign that the gulf crisis is entering a critical period and that he is best qualified to handle it.Michael Heseltine, a former defense secretary, said he would back a deadline if it were imposed by the United Nations, adding: "I have been, I think, amongst the foremost of Mrs. Thatcher's backbenchers to support the stand her government has taken in support of the international force."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 16, 1990
LONDON -- Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, fighting for political survival, said yesterday she would continue leading "the only party with clear policies, resolutely carried out."Opinion polls gave conflicting signals yesterday on the challenge of former Defense Secretary Michael Heseltine to her leadership of the Conservative Party, and indirectly her leadership of the country.The polls suggested that the public would prefer Mr. Heseltine as Tory leader, but they also showed that she remained the favorite inside her party.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 15, 1990
LONDON -- Former Defense Minister Michael Heseltine challenged Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher yesterday for leadership of Britain's Conservative Party and the country, throwing the entire political scene here into turmoil.He acted less than 24 hours after Mrs. Thatcher was subjected to a devastating attack in the House of Commons by her former deputy, Sir Geoffrey Howe, over her anti-European attitude."I am persuaded that I would have a better chance now, a better prospect now, than Mrs. Thatcher of leading the Conservatives into a fourth election victory, thus avoiding the ultimate calamity of a Labor government," Mr. Heseltine said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.