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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Less than three years after the end of the Cold War, armed conflicts let loose a wave of inhumanity in many nations last year, producing widespread civilian deaths and refugee flows, tortures, summary executions and rapes, the State Department reported yesterday."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 19, 1992
MOSTAR, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The ruins of the dream of a peaceful future for Balkan republics are nowhere more visible than in the rubble of this historic town.Serbian forces have blown up six major bridges, burned hundreds of homes and businesses and wrecked both of the principal religious centers, a modern Catholic cathedral and a stately 15th-century mosque.From nearby hills, Serbian gunners are still shelling Mostar, but there is little left to destroy. Streets once lined with tour buses are now littered with the debris of war, and a community that was once thought to symbolize friendship among Serbs, Croats and Muslims is now gone, a victim of the bitter hatreds fueling this war.Probably no large town in Bosnia and Herzegovina has suffered as much damage as Mostar.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | May 13, 1992
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- From the basement where she hides with four other families, Naza Ganic listens to the nightly sounds of guns and mortars, and knows her city has died."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 5, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- There were grilled hot dogs and hamburgers and "The Star-Spangled Banner" and the words "democracy" and "freedom" floated through the sticky midsummer air.Fireworks were absent, but much of the picnic talk at the Fourth of July opening of the U.S. Embassy focused not on that but on whether the support of the United States, this country's staunch diplomatic backer, would somehow make a difference in silencing the guns of...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Unwilling to use force and unable otherwise to stop the fierce fighting in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the West is playing what may be its last remaining card in the region that once ignited a world war.It will isolate Serbia.European Community nations agreed in Brussels yesterday to recall their ambassadors from Belgrade, the Serbian capital and once capital of the now-disintegrated Yugoslavia. It is a step U.S. officials have seriously considered as well.Meanwhile, the 52-nation Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE)
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | May 24, 1992
TUZLA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Asim Krilic is 4 years old. His main concern last week was that nobody snatch his scruffy pale blue elephant. He showed little apprehension as his mother hauled him onto yet another battered bus for yet another long and weary journey. As long as his blue elephant was with him, the world was all right.Only in years to come will he understand what his mother, father and sister -- and hundreds of thousands of others -- feel deep in their bones. That is that in the heart of Europe a whole people -- Yugoslavia's Muslims -- is being cast off its land and forced to start a wandering life in other people's countries.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | August 15, 1992
CAJNICE, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Western powers are worrying about becoming entangled in a Lebanon-style civil war in Bosnia. But Serbs in this frontier town about six miles from embattled Gorazde say it'll be their Vietnam.Others have found this land an unconquerable place, they say."I don't expect the Americans to bomb us from the air," said a local commander known as Gypsy, a bearded young man in his late twenties, ignoring bursts of machine-gun fire that punctuated the stifling summer air. "But if they want to do it, let them come."
NEWS
By James Drake and James Drake,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1997
PAZARIC, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Old soldiers never die -- they simply become "consultants."Hunkered down in a bunker 25 miles west of Sarajevo, Col. Clark Welch -- late of the U.S. Army's Special Forces -- is plotting the downfall of the Bosnian Serb army. "Eight hundred hours tomorrow, we 'move to contact,' " cackles the ebullient Vietnam veteran to a group of staff officers gathered around a pin-riddled wall map. "They'd better be ready, 'cuz we're gonna kick the crap out of them."Fighting talk.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: Costa Rica did CONCACAF proud and Honduras tried, but France put on a performance against a fraudulent Swiss side that not many European sides have been capable of in Brazil. What's on tap: Argentina vs. Iran, 12 p.m., ESPN; Germany vs. Ghana, 3 p.m., ESPN; Nigeria vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina, 6 p.m.. What you'll see: The day's opener will feature Lionel Messi and the uber-talented Argentine side try to break down a group of Iranians that will park the bus in front of goal under Portuguese manager Carlos Queiroz.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Growing up, when Alex Pownall watched his father, he saw a man who loved his job. John Pownall has served 20 years in the military, the last 12 as a recruiter for the Maryland National Guard. He was sent to defend Andrews Air Force Base after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and advised the Afghan National Army in 2011 and 2012. "He looked forward to drill, and he came home happy," Alex Pownall said. So when Alex turned 17 last year, he needed no convincing. He joined the Maryland National Guard in October and is waiting to finish high school so he can go to boot camp.
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