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By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@patuxent.com | March 10, 2013
"Arrow on the Doorpost"? More like "Arrow on the SNOREpost"! Just kidding. I understand that not every episode can be action-packed from start to finish with major plot twists, characters dying and hordes of zombies being slaughtered in exotic and graphic ways. But at the end of this episode, when Rick forebodingly growls "We're going to war... ", I was thinking: "Isn't that what you said like four months ago?" Hey Rick, don't tell me, show me! There are only three episodes left this season, so at least we know we're going to see the pace pick up soon, but this whole episode basically just served to develop character relationships and further hype the big brawl that we already knew was coming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | December 1, 2013
Whoa! There is a ton of heavy stuff to discuss from Sunday night's midseason finale of "The Walking Dead" on AMC, but first, a serious question: Is the Governor really dead? I know that we saw him get stabbed through the center of the back and chest with Michonne's Shinobi sword, and then we saw Lilly stand over him and fire her gun in the direction of his head. But we never actually saw him die. I've learned that in shows like these - "The Walking Dead", " Magnum, P.I. ", " Legends of the Hidden Temple " - that a character isn't actually dead and gone until we see their rotten, decomposing carcass.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | October 27, 2013
This week's episode of "The Walking Dead" was especially quotey but not especially bitey. Lots of characters dropped pearls of eloquent wisdom, but not many characters were bitten by zombies. Of course, that's not as big of a deal anymore, because cats are just getting all sickly and turning up as zombies without even getting munched on at this point. It's like if you were playing "Tag" in the schoolyard and all of the sudden you were just "tagged" without being touched by anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | October 27, 2013
This week's episode of "The Walking Dead" was especially quotey but not especially bitey. Lots of characters dropped pearls of eloquent wisdom, but not many characters were bitten by zombies. Of course, that's not as big of a deal anymore, because cats are just getting all sickly and turning up as zombies without even getting munched on at this point. It's like if you were playing "Tag" in the schoolyard and all of the sudden you were just "tagged" without being touched by anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | November 27, 2011
Finally, and I mean finally! Sunday night's installment of "The Walking Dead" was the midseason finale, and it took almost 50 minutes into the episode, titled "Pretty Much Dead Already," to get there, but we finally got some of the satisfaction that we were waiting for. Up until that last ten minutes, though, I was starting to worry that we were in for another cliffhanger where the characters are standing around with concerned looks on their faces...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | December 1, 2013
Whoa! There is a ton of heavy stuff to discuss from Sunday night's midseason finale of "The Walking Dead" on AMC, but first, a serious question: Is the Governor really dead? I know that we saw him get stabbed through the center of the back and chest with Michonne's Shinobi sword, and then we saw Lilly stand over him and fire her gun in the direction of his head. But we never actually saw him die. I've learned that in shows like these - "The Walking Dead", " Magnum, P.I. ", " Legends of the Hidden Temple " - that a character isn't actually dead and gone until we see their rotten, decomposing carcass.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | September 16, 1998
Eric A. Kimmel, author of "Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins" and "Anansi and the Talking Melon," spent his childhood surrounded by all sorts of literature. Books and stories helped mold his desire to become an author, and especially those tales told by his grandmother.In kindergarten, when Kimmel's teacher told his class that books are written by people, he was fascinated, and decided that some day he wanted to see his name on the cover of a book.Kimmel begins by finding a story that captures his emotions and tells it to himself over and over again.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2001
Hershel H. Newlin, a public high school teacher in Baltimore and former naval officer, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at his home in Jacksonville, northern Baltimore County. He was 93. For about eight years in the 1930s, Mr. Newlin taught mechanical drawing and shop at Polytechnic Institute and Southern High School. "He was proud of having taught at Poly, and he was also proud of having been an officer in the Navy," said his son, Michael J. Newlin Jr. of Timonium. Born in Marshall, Ind., Mr. Newlin worked as a teen with his father building and remodeling houses, barns and churches.
NEWS
By JOE POPPER and JOE POPPER,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 1999
Last July, more than 30,000 fully uniformed Civil War re-enactors gathered in Gettysburg, Pa., to travel back in time and "see the elephant," which in 19th-century parlance meant experiencing combat.They came to restage the fateful, three-day battle fought there in 1863. Among them was a 68-year-old retired dentist from Topeka, Kan., Herschel L. Stroud.Seeing the elephant and not actually getting shot at is a wondrous experience, said Stroud, a wiry, goateed, hyper-energetic man who scuba dives, plays trumpet in a swing band, sings in a barbershop quartet and races sailboats on Lake Shawnee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@patuxent.com | March 10, 2013
"Arrow on the Doorpost"? More like "Arrow on the SNOREpost"! Just kidding. I understand that not every episode can be action-packed from start to finish with major plot twists, characters dying and hordes of zombies being slaughtered in exotic and graphic ways. But at the end of this episode, when Rick forebodingly growls "We're going to war... ", I was thinking: "Isn't that what you said like four months ago?" Hey Rick, don't tell me, show me! There are only three episodes left this season, so at least we know we're going to see the pace pick up soon, but this whole episode basically just served to develop character relationships and further hype the big brawl that we already knew was coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | November 27, 2011
Finally, and I mean finally! Sunday night's installment of "The Walking Dead" was the midseason finale, and it took almost 50 minutes into the episode, titled "Pretty Much Dead Already," to get there, but we finally got some of the satisfaction that we were waiting for. Up until that last ten minutes, though, I was starting to worry that we were in for another cliffhanger where the characters are standing around with concerned looks on their faces...
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2001
Hershel H. Newlin, a public high school teacher in Baltimore and former naval officer, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at his home in Jacksonville, northern Baltimore County. He was 93. For about eight years in the 1930s, Mr. Newlin taught mechanical drawing and shop at Polytechnic Institute and Southern High School. "He was proud of having taught at Poly, and he was also proud of having been an officer in the Navy," said his son, Michael J. Newlin Jr. of Timonium. Born in Marshall, Ind., Mr. Newlin worked as a teen with his father building and remodeling houses, barns and churches.
NEWS
By JOE POPPER and JOE POPPER,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 1999
Last July, more than 30,000 fully uniformed Civil War re-enactors gathered in Gettysburg, Pa., to travel back in time and "see the elephant," which in 19th-century parlance meant experiencing combat.They came to restage the fateful, three-day battle fought there in 1863. Among them was a 68-year-old retired dentist from Topeka, Kan., Herschel L. Stroud.Seeing the elephant and not actually getting shot at is a wondrous experience, said Stroud, a wiry, goateed, hyper-energetic man who scuba dives, plays trumpet in a swing band, sings in a barbershop quartet and races sailboats on Lake Shawnee.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | September 16, 1998
Eric A. Kimmel, author of "Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins" and "Anansi and the Talking Melon," spent his childhood surrounded by all sorts of literature. Books and stories helped mold his desire to become an author, and especially those tales told by his grandmother.In kindergarten, when Kimmel's teacher told his class that books are written by people, he was fascinated, and decided that some day he wanted to see his name on the cover of a book.Kimmel begins by finding a story that captures his emotions and tells it to himself over and over again.
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