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September 6, 2011
Ten years. That's the milestone we now mark. It has been a full decade since the most shocking event in the lifetime of many Americans happened - the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The anguish will always be with us. There is evidence we can still see - the graves of more than 3,000 victims. And some we cannot - the fear we bear that it could happen again. Although 9/11 is closely associated with New York, where the twin towers fell, the pain is carried by people everywhere, and not just from the simultaneous attack on the Pentagon and the hijacked airliner that crashed in a Pennsylvania field.
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NEWS
By Mary McCauley and Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
When the report of a shooting came in over the radio last September at the Navy Yard in Washington, Master at Arms Charles Pitt initially assumed it was a drill. "These things don't really happen here," said the Annapolis-area resident. Pitt got into a vehicle with his 5-year-old black German shepherd, Olli, and headed to the site of the call, discovering it was all too real. Gunman Aaron Alexis, a computer technician for a private Navy contractor, was on a shooting rampage that left 13 people dead, including himself, and injured three others.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
Kimberly Hanline went home from work and hugged her son. "He just looked up at me, but he knew that I had cried." Hanline was the first Baltimore police officer to help 5-year-old Raven Wyatt after she had collapsed on Pulaski Street from a bullet fired into her head last summer. Hanline and Officer Monica Nashan cradled the wounded girl and restored her pulse with chest compressions. "When we did CPR, she started to move," Hanline said. Both officers later went home to their own children, emotionally drained from a day that would become a focal point for a city tired of shootings and upset that an innocent girl had been hit by a stray bullet as she walked home from a store carrying a new set of hair beads.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
- The Navy will award its highest non-combat decoration for heroism Friday to a Hagerstown sailor killed last month in a shooting in Norfolk, Va., officials said. Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark A. Mayo, who was assigned to Naval Security Forces at Naval Station Norfolk, was shielding a sailor from a civilian truck driver who had taken her gun during the March 24 confrontation aboard the destroyer USS Mahan, officials said. Mayo was 24. Jeffrey Tyrone Savage shot Mayo, officials said.
NEWS
May 28, 1993
Six Anne Arundel County Fire Department employees received awards for heroism yesterday during a ceremony at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.Capt. Gary Sheckells, Chief Charles Rogers, firefighter Deborah Rodey, and acting Lt. Michele Delalla, an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), were awarded the Emergency Medical System Certificate of Honor for their rescue May 16, 1992, of a woman who was thrown from a raft in West Virginia.The four were off-duty at the time. The woman later died.Firefighter and EMT Barton Shortall and Lt. James D. Kruger also were awarded the EMS Certificate of Honor for treating two stabbing victims at the Maryland House of Corrections in Jessup on July 10, 1992.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 20, 1996
LONDON -- Graham Swift's world is south of the Tower Bridge, a place of crumbling docks and tattered row homes where tourists and novelists rarely go. It is the setting of his novel "Last Orders," a work that meshes drama and comedy as it follows four men bearing a friend's ashes on a pub crawl and pilgrimage from the working-class neighborhood of Bermondsey to the sea at Margate."
NEWS
September 22, 1997
An ROTC cadet at Western Maryland College recently received the ROTC Medal for Heroism, the highest award given to cadets by the Army, for helping to save the life of the driver of an overturned UPS van in August 1996.Dudley "D. J." Cobb, 23, a former Severn and Laurel resident who lives in Westminster with his wife, was honored earlier this month in a ceremony at the school where he is a senior majoring in exercise science.Cobb was traveling to Lynchburg, Va., with the college soccer team when a United Parcel Service truck swerved and overturned ahead of the team's southbound vehicle on U.S. 29 in Virginia.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
More than a century after he stood alone on a bridge, fending off the advance of 6,000 Union troops with a single cannon, a Confederate soldier from Anne Arundel County was honored yesterday for his bravery.A 12-foot-high bronze statue of Pvt. Benjamin Welch Owens was unveiled in the rural south Anne Arundel town of Lothian to the chirping of the penny whistle and the thunder of Civil War artillery. More than 200 people gathered -- many in period costume -- to pay tribute to a common man who displayed uncommon valor.
NEWS
December 26, 2001
THE MOST reassuring aspect of terrorism, professional and amateur, real and imagined, is its capacity to bring out common sense, cooperation and heroism on the part of ordinary people. The heroes of this holiday season are the 14 flight crew members and 183 passengers who were aboard American Airlines Flight 63 Saturday. They prevented a real act of terrorism that might have killed them all when they subdued a mad bomber who had outwitted airport security. Stewardesses Hermis Moutardier and Cristina Jones, and passengers Thierry Dugeon and Kwame James, acted coolly and efficiently in preventing the man with the British passport in the name of Richard C. Reid from igniting explosives in his shoes.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | February 14, 2009
The screams of a neighbor, a man Dawn Ryan knew only in passing, woke her about 3:30 a.m. yesterday. Looking out a window, she saw his house on fire and yelled to her husband, Jack, who called 911 and then bolted out of their Perry Hall home in his pajamas. About the same time, Stacey Cosentino awoke to a bright orange glow beaming into her bedroom window. As her eyes adjusted, she realized her next-door neighbors' rear deck was on fire. She, too, prodded awake her husband, Richard, who jumped out of bed and ran outside.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
As they prepared for the helicopter assault in volatile eastern Afghanistan, the team of American and Afghan special-forces soldiers was told it might encounter 10 to 15 enemy fighters on the ground. But when the sun rose over Laghman Province that day two years ago, the men found themselves taking machine-gun fire from a force of more than 100. "It turned into a battle of survival," Maryland Air National Guard Capt. Barry F. Crawford Jr. said Wednesday. "The enemy was completely around us. They had called in reinforcements, and they were using the terrain to their advantage.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
James Hopkins Berger, a retired purchasing agent who in his youth earned a Carnegie Hero Award for saving the lives of two family members during a 1958 Roland Park house fire, died Dec. 15 of prostate cancer at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Mays Chapel resident was 71. The son of a career Army officer and an educator, Mr. Berger was born in Aberdeen and moved to Roland Avenue with his family and later to Guilford. "He survived polio as a child and his determination to help overcome a paralyzed left side helped him achieve a full recovery," said his wife of 46 years, the former Ann Turner Carroll.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2011
Ten years. That's the milestone we now mark. It has been a full decade since the most shocking event in the lifetime of many Americans happened - the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The anguish will always be with us. There is evidence we can still see - the graves of more than 3,000 victims. And some we cannot - the fear we bear that it could happen again. Although 9/11 is closely associated with New York, where the twin towers fell, the pain is carried by people everywhere, and not just from the simultaneous attack on the Pentagon and the hijacked airliner that crashed in a Pennsylvania field.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
Kimberly Hanline went home from work and hugged her son. "He just looked up at me, but he knew that I had cried." Hanline was the first Baltimore police officer to help 5-year-old Raven Wyatt after she had collapsed on Pulaski Street from a bullet fired into her head last summer. Hanline and Officer Monica Nashan cradled the wounded girl and restored her pulse with chest compressions. "When we did CPR, she started to move," Hanline said. Both officers later went home to their own children, emotionally drained from a day that would become a focal point for a city tired of shootings and upset that an innocent girl had been hit by a stray bullet as she walked home from a store carrying a new set of hair beads.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
H erman J. Travers, a retired postal worker who survived the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later received two Bronze Stars for heroism during the Battle of Peleiu, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Tuesday at Genesis Loch Raven Center. He was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised in Canton, Mr. Travers attended Patterson High School for a year before dropping out and going to work in waterfront packing houses in Fells Point and Canton to help support his family.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
When the Metro train pulled into the Silver Spring station late Monday afternoon, Michael Corcoran made a split-second decision that might have saved his life. Rather than hoof to the end car, which would conveniently deposit him beside an escalator at his destination, Union Station, he stepped into the third car and took a seat. Corcoran, 39, just felt happy to be escaping his job as a federal contractor before 5 p.m. for a change. Even with the punishing two-hour-plus commute to Jarrettsville, he figured he'd get home early enough to play with his four kids, maybe even mow the grass.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | May 2, 2007
Saving the day comes naturally to Antonello Palombi. Tosca opens at 8:15 p.m. Saturday and runs through May 13 at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. $45-$127. 410-727-6000 or baltimoreopera.com.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
Revanche gets under your skin and stays there for days. It contains one or two ludicrous passages, such as the most abrupt orgasmic love scene since Mandingo. But the movie is thoroughly original and cumulatively potent: a stiff drink that boasts staying power. Writer-director Gotz Spielmann has created a dirty cinematic pastorale that spans the red-light district of Vienna and a picture-book hamlet light-years removed in spirit. Midway through the film, an old farmer named Hausner (Hannes Thanheiser)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
Revanche gets under your skin and stays there for days. It contains one or two ludicrous passages, such as the most abrupt orgasmic love scene since Mandingo. But the movie is thoroughly original and cumulatively potent: a stiff drink that boasts staying power. Writer-director Gotz Spielmann has created a dirty cinematic pastorale that spans the red-light district of Vienna and a picture-book hamlet light-years removed in spirit. Midway through the film, an old farmer named Hausner (Hannes Thanheiser)
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