Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHeroin
IN THE NEWS

Heroin

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Drug dealers are lacing heroin with the potent painkiller fentanyl, creating a deadly cocktail that is killing unknowing users - sometimes within minutes of use. The drug combination has killed dozens of people in several states, prompting law enforcement and health officials to issue warnings about its danger. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Friday that 37 Marylanders had died since September of overdoses after taking the drug mixture. The deaths accounted for 12 percent of 318 overdose deaths in the past four months.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Kudos to commentator Kevin Shird's thoughtful op-ed on the realities of heroin use ( "Baltimore's deserved heroin reputation," Sept 17). Mr. Shird amplifies the vital discussion raised in previous columns by The Sun's Dan Rodricks . I agree that the labeling of Baltimore as America's heroin capital and the actual number of heroin users should not be the focus of policymakers, foundations and community leaders. During the past year, my work entailed visits to nonprofit agencies in Boise, Idaho; Jefferson City, Mo.; Birmingham, Ala.; and Dayton, Ohio.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
The Annapolis police chief said Tuesday his officers "disrupted if not dismantled" one of the capital city's heroin distribution networks with a series of indictments and arrests. Working with the Anne Arundel County Police, Maryland State Police and the Calvert County Sheriff's Office, Annapolis Police Chief Michael Pristoop announced his officers arrested five of nine people who have been indicted on drug distribution charges. Police also made a handful of "collateral arrests" and expect to announce more arrests in the coming days.
NEWS
By Kevin Shird | September 17, 2014
"The Heroin Capital of America" - what an unpleasant way to describe Baltimore. But stay seated, I'll get back to that in a second. I want to talk about something else first, "COAP" which stands for Children of Addicted Parents. For some, it's a difficult term to comprehend, but for many of those labeled with it, it's a life sentence. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, children of addicted parents are more likely to exhibit symptoms of depression and anxiety; they're at a higher risk of becoming alcohol and drug abusers due to both genetic and family environment factors; and they experience greater physical and mental health problems and higher health and welfare costs than do children from non-addicted families.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | May 29, 2012
A 53-year-old Baltimore man was sentenced to 10 years in federal prison Tuesday for conspiracy to distribute heroin, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced. Kevin Hently led the organization, according to prosecutors, securing a drug supply from New York and selling up to three kilograms of it in Baltimore city and county in 2009 and 2010. Three conspirators, ages 44 to 52, have also pleaded guilty in the case and been sentenced to terms ranging from four to 10 years, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | June 22, 2012
A 41-year-old Baltimore man was sentenced to 12 years in prison Friday for his role in a heroin conspiracy that spread through three Maryland counties, federal prosecutors announced. Alvin Williams Jr., who used his home to process the drug which was distributed throughout the city as well as Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties, pleaded guilty in April, after two days of trial. To date, more than two dozen of the roughly 30 people indicted in the case have pleaded guilty. The drug ring was run by Christian Gettis, who described himself during a February sentencing hearing as a family man living a double life: secretly dealing drugs while holding down a job in retail.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
A detention hearing will continue today in the federal case against Mark Alan Bryan, a Washington County man who is accused of selling a fatal dose of heroin to a Hagerstown college student in 2008. Bryan, 22, of Maugansville was arrested this month on federal charges of conspiracy to distribute heroin and cocaine, as well as drug distribution resulting in death. A detention hearing began Monday afternoon, but was held over after the judge determined that too many facts were in dispute to continue in the allotted time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 6, 2011
At the first GOP debate tonight in Greenville, S.C., Republican presidential candidate and U.S. Congressman Ron Paul made the case for legalizing drugs, even heroin.  In an exchange with Fox News' Chris Wallace, Paul made the point that people should have the freedom to do things to themselves that might seem crazy to others.   "You have a right to do things that are very controversial," Paul said.   "Are you sugggesting that heroin and prostitution are an exercise of liberty?"
NEWS
January 30, 2010
A Baltimore man returning from Ghana was arrested at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport Tuesday after nearly seven pounds of heroin was found hidden in his suitcase, according to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Suleiman Zakaria, 26, was randomly selected by a customs officer for a secondary examination while he was in the passenger arrivals area about 6 p.m. Officers found the heroin, worth about $430,000 wholesale, in a false bottom of his suitcase, authorities said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
An Elkton woman indicted last year alongside a reputed drug kingpin on charges they ran a vast heroin ring was sentenced to 11 years in federal prison Monday, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced. Tahirah Carter, 35, was charged with drug conspiracy in August for her role as a courier for Steven Blackwell Jr., a key player, authorities say, in a violent drug feud that has led to at least four homicides and several shootouts on Baltimore streets. She pleaded guilty last fall, according to online court records, though much about her case has been kept secret.
NEWS
Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
Robert Taylor Jr., and Camille Haviland thought they were being safe - within the bounds of their dangerous heroin habit, that is. Having bought from a new dealer, Taylor tried just one capsule instead of his usual three or four. Haviland left on an errand; when she returned 15 minutes later, she found him collapsed on the ground, bluish and not breathing. She started CPR. When paramedics arrived, they injected Taylor with the overdose-reversing drug, naloxone. "At the time, I would have liked to have had this," Haviland said recently after she and Taylor were trained and certified to administer the drug themselves.
BUSINESS
Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
A federal judge imposed a six-year sentence Friday on Jacob Theodore George IV, who sold heroin on the online drug bazaar Silk Road. George, 33, an Edgewood man with a history of arrests, drug abuse and mental health problems, apologized to the judge. He said he cried as he confessed to the federal agents who caught him. "I made a bad decision helping with Silk Road," George said, reading from prepared notes. George, who was taken into custody in early 2012, was one of the first dealers on the site to be arrested.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
The recent dramatic rise in heroin overdose deaths has reached near epidemic levels in Maryland ( "Overdose deaths are preventable," Aug. 29). The commentary by Deanna Wilson, Stephanie Sparrow and Jennifer Kirschner is an important follow up to the views expressed by Sun columnist Dan Rodricks , who questioned the accuracy of the reported number of heroin addicts in Baltimore ( "Heroin capital claim based on an old, bad number," Aug. 28). Regrettably, it appears that the rest of America has caught up with Baltimore's widespread substance abuse problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 28, 2014
What a difference four decades, a bad number, the war on drugs and reality television made: In 1975, National Geographic magazine devoted 27 glossy pages to the hidden charms of Baltimore. In 2014, the National Geographic Channel devotes an hour to the city's degeneracy and proclaims Baltimore "the Heroin Capital of America. " Some Baltimoreans might have saved that old National Geographic, from February 1975, because it provided a great boost to the civic ego. Numerous photographs accompanied Fred Kline's glowing prose.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Drug sales in broad daylight at Lexington Market. An addict telling viewers Baltimore "is where you want to be for heroin," and then, after she scores, letting the camera watch her cook and shoot up in her car on a street that appears to be in Hampden. A masked drug dealer sitting at a table full of dope, pointing his gun at the camera and saying, "Coming to you live from Baltimore. " An on-screen headline that says, "Baltimore is the heroin capital of America. " This is how Baltimore is depicted in the National Geographic Channel's "Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire," which premieres at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
A Gwynn Oak man was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison for his role in a conspiracy to sell between 1 and 3 kilograms of heroin, prosecutors said. Recco F. Beaufort, 52, was the principal transporter of heroin for a drug trafficking group that processed and distributed heroin less than 1,000 feet from a charter school, according to a statement from Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Beaufort delivered heroin for a New Jersey man named Charles C. "Billy" Guy, 43, to a Baltimore man named Christian Gettis, 39, the statement said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
From a home base in Houston, federal authorities say, a Remington native has been directing a cross-country drug operation that shipped large quantities of heroin to Baltimore, New York, New Orleans and elsewhere. Fred Douglas Brooks III, 46, had already served two federal prison terms for drug trafficking when he allegedly launched a new venture despite having betrayed a crew of Mexican suppliers by testifying against them in 2005. The latest business - a "high-level, interstate narcotics-trafficking and money-laundering operation," according to federal prosecutors in Louisiana - flourished until his arrest June 30 in Houston, authorities say. At least 16 people, including Brooks, have been charged in connection with the case; seven are charged in U.S. District Court in Maryland.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
A total of 60,000 heroin addicts in Baltimore: It's a number that has cropped up in news stories and public pronouncements in various forms over the years. But it's a statistic with murky origins and that some say is vastly inflated. Sen. Barbara A. Milkuski included the figure in a recent news release, using information from federal law enforcement, according to her office. A spokesman for the Baltimore office of the Drug Enforcement Administration said it's a tally agents there also recognize.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.