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By Walter Reich | June 5, 2007
After 2,000 years of indignity and ignominy, Herod the Great has finally gotten his revenge. During their revolt against Roman rule over Judea between 66 and 72 A.D., Jews who remembered King Herod as a Roman puppet smashed his sarcophagus, which had been interred with royal pomp about 70 years before. Christians have identified him as a baby killer who forced Jesus' family to flee Bethlehem. And Herod's habit of having his rivals and relatives killed has hardly burnished his image. True, he built monumental projects - not only Masada and Caesarea but also the grand expansion of the second Jewish temple in Jerusalem, the best-known remnant of which is the Western Wall.
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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | July 16, 2009
A summer Sunday in an old Midwestern river town, walking down the avenue under the elms past yards burgeoning with vinous and hedgy things and multicolored flowerage, the industry of each homeowner shown in the beauty offered to the passerby. The children of these homeowners may be telling their therapists harrowing tales of emotional deprivation suffered in this very home, and yet back in April and May, weekends were devoted to making this front yard splendid, and that is worth something.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 15, 1996
Queen Isabella invaded from France, had her husband Edward II slain and their son crowned Edward III. That was in 1327. It's not an option today.Northern Ireland is reverting to the 1690s, or the 1960s.Archaeologists found King Herod's wine jug. It was empty, or so they said.Pub Date: 7/15/96
NEWS
By Walter Reich | June 5, 2007
After 2,000 years of indignity and ignominy, Herod the Great has finally gotten his revenge. During their revolt against Roman rule over Judea between 66 and 72 A.D., Jews who remembered King Herod as a Roman puppet smashed his sarcophagus, which had been interred with royal pomp about 70 years before. Christians have identified him as a baby killer who forced Jesus' family to flee Bethlehem. And Herod's habit of having his rivals and relatives killed has hardly burnished his image. True, he built monumental projects - not only Masada and Caesarea but also the grand expansion of the second Jewish temple in Jerusalem, the best-known remnant of which is the Western Wall.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | July 16, 2009
A summer Sunday in an old Midwestern river town, walking down the avenue under the elms past yards burgeoning with vinous and hedgy things and multicolored flowerage, the industry of each homeowner shown in the beauty offered to the passerby. The children of these homeowners may be telling their therapists harrowing tales of emotional deprivation suffered in this very home, and yet back in April and May, weekends were devoted to making this front yard splendid, and that is worth something.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 15, 2004
Within the span of about 90 minutes, Richard Strauss' Salome encapsulates the eternal tug of war between good and evil - and many gray shades in between. This 1905 opera, like the Oscar Wilde play that inspired it, provides a hallucinatory take on the familiar Bible story, creating a high-sensory realm where ideals and desires collide and collapse. Like a colossal car wreck, the appalling sight at the end has audiences craning their necks to see; it's impossible to look away. The Baltimore Opera Company's production of Salome reconfirms the work's strange pull.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 10, 1995
Now here's a high concept for a movie: Sharon Stone is Clint Eastwood.It makes sense: Both have faces so lean, angular and epic they resemble the landscape photography of Ansel Adams, and both look good in leather.And upon that sturdy rock is "The Quick and the Dead" built. It's a tale of the West, the West that was west not of St. Louis but of Rome back in the '60s when Eastwood quit shaving, strapped on an Uberti-replica Colt and made himself an international star in three movies from the outlaw genius Sergio Leone.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,Los Angeles Times | May 11, 2007
JERUSALEM -- For more than three decades, Israeli archaeologist Ehud Netzer scraped at the ancient man-made hillock. He searched the top. He dug at the bottom. Finally Netzer carved into the midsection and there, he claims, found his prize: the grave of Herod the Great. The evidence, in the form of shards of decorative stonework that may have been a coffin and pieces of a structure thought to have been the mausoleum, is still far from ironclad proof. Archaeologists have not found a body.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 27, 1997
JERUSALEM -- After serving 15 1/2 years of a life sentence for a terrorist attack on a Muslim holy shrine, Baltimore-born Alan H. Goodman was released from an Israeli prison last night under an agreement that enabled the convicted killer to return to Maryland, prison officials said.Goodman, 53, was scheduled to leave Israel on a flight bound for the United States and a reunion with his mother, Fannie, in Baltimore.Goodman was convicted on murder and assault with intent to murder charges in an April 11, 1982, shooting in the courtyard of the Al Aqsa mosque on the sacred Temple Mount in Jerusalem, the third-holiest shrine in Islam.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1995
A University of Maryland historian and his team of archaeologists have uncovered the foundations of a grand pagan temple erected by Herod the Great, the wily and tyrannical ruler of Palestine in the first century B.C. and one of the master builders of the ancient world.After weeks of digging, excavators in July exposed some of the massive stones that once supported the gleaming, 2,000-year-old temple at Caesarea, Israel. They also recovered pieces of its columns and other sculpted stone.King Herod built the city and the temple about a decade before the birth of Christ.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,Los Angeles Times | May 11, 2007
JERUSALEM -- For more than three decades, Israeli archaeologist Ehud Netzer scraped at the ancient man-made hillock. He searched the top. He dug at the bottom. Finally Netzer carved into the midsection and there, he claims, found his prize: the grave of Herod the Great. The evidence, in the form of shards of decorative stonework that may have been a coffin and pieces of a structure thought to have been the mausoleum, is still far from ironclad proof. Archaeologists have not found a body.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 15, 2004
Within the span of about 90 minutes, Richard Strauss' Salome encapsulates the eternal tug of war between good and evil - and many gray shades in between. This 1905 opera, like the Oscar Wilde play that inspired it, provides a hallucinatory take on the familiar Bible story, creating a high-sensory realm where ideals and desires collide and collapse. Like a colossal car wreck, the appalling sight at the end has audiences craning their necks to see; it's impossible to look away. The Baltimore Opera Company's production of Salome reconfirms the work's strange pull.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 15, 1996
Queen Isabella invaded from France, had her husband Edward II slain and their son crowned Edward III. That was in 1327. It's not an option today.Northern Ireland is reverting to the 1690s, or the 1960s.Archaeologists found King Herod's wine jug. It was empty, or so they said.Pub Date: 7/15/96
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 10, 1995
Now here's a high concept for a movie: Sharon Stone is Clint Eastwood.It makes sense: Both have faces so lean, angular and epic they resemble the landscape photography of Ansel Adams, and both look good in leather.And upon that sturdy rock is "The Quick and the Dead" built. It's a tale of the West, the West that was west not of St. Louis but of Rome back in the '60s when Eastwood quit shaving, strapped on an Uberti-replica Colt and made himself an international star in three movies from the outlaw genius Sergio Leone.
NEWS
June 10, 2003
On June 7, 2003, FRANCES TEDESCO FORD, 83, former resident of Towson and of Mercy Ridge in Timonium, beloved wife of the late Richard S. Ford, sister of Nick, Tony, and Arthur Tedesco, of Uniontown, PA, aunt of many loving nieces and nephews, retired waitress in finer restaurants in Baltimore area for many years. Friends may call at the Richard R. Herod Funeral Home, 501 Morgantown St., Point Marion, PA 15474 on Wednesday from 11 A.M. until 1:30 P.M. Burial Mass at 2 P.M. in St. Hubert's Church, Point Marion.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 26, 1998
JERICHO, West Bank -- A shrine of a different kind is about to open here.It's a $150 million casino-hotel under construction on a barren, sun-seared plot on the edge of this spring-fed, West Bank town )) that some archaeologists date to 8,000 B.C.Yasser Arafat's Palestinian Authority is backing the project. An Israeli public relations firm is promoting it. An Austrian outfit with unidentified Arab partners is developing the project. And the complaints of religious fundamentalists won't stop it.The peace process should be so easy.
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