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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 18, 2004
IT'S BEEN over a week since the hurricane rightly called Ivan the Terrible ripped through Grenada, destroyed or damaged 90 percent of the homes and left at least 39 people dead and thousands homeless. Electricity was kaput. I've heard that phone service has been restored, but I still haven't been able to get in touch with the one Grenadian I hope was not among the 39 fatalities. My list of heroes is a short one, but Leslie Pierre sits at the very top of it. Pierre is the founder, publisher and editor of The Grenadian Voice, a newspaper he started in the early 1980s in direct defiance of the Provisional Revolutionary Government, which was run by devotees of the Marxist New Jewel Movement.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- All week long, House Speaker Newt Gingrich has been saying he wants to throw Rep. Robert G. Torricelli off the House Select Committee on Intelligence. He and others in the House were angry that the New Jersey Democrat had revealed evidence of CIA links to the killer of an American in Guatemala.But in the end, House Republicans decided yesterday that they so disliked Mr. Torricelli that they did not want to make him a martyr. And at the last moment yesterday afternoon, they referred the matter to the House ethics committee.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 17, 1997
A long time ago, Gil Dunn discovered a truth about his hero's hometown -- the people in Sudlersville who remembered Jimmie Foxx didn't want to talk about him. He might have been one of the greatest right-handed sluggers ever, but his life after baseball seemed like one long stumble down a dark staircase. Years after his best clippings had turned yellow, his name would appear in sad newspaper updates that described him as broke or suggested a drinking problem. During one of the last trips Jimmie Foxx made to Sudlersville, on Maryland's Eastern Shore, he couldn't get a personal check cashed.
FEATURES
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Special to The Sun | May 31, 1994
His friends dreamed of the Shadow and the Lone Ranger, but young David Sawyer had only one hero: Stonewall Jackson."Back then, there were people like Tom Mix, Tex Ritter, Buck Jones," Mr. Sawyer, 66, says of his boyhood in Depression-era North Carolina. "These were white cowboy heroes. Their deeds of daring were nothing in my mind compared to the legendary Stonewall Jackson."Friends, relatives and teachers were confounded by this young black boy who idolized a Confederate general. But to Mr. Sawyer, Jackson was not only an idol and a role model, he was a relative.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | August 14, 1995
He was bigger than life. But he was only human.Mickey Mantle should be remembered as the blond-haired, thickly muscled Oklahoman who became one of baseball's all-time greats.He also should be remembered as the gaunt, frail figure whose alcoholism was at least partly responsible for the liver cancer that left him dead at the age of 63.One image cannot endure without the other.To savor Mantle simply as a sports hero is to ignore his life of excess.But to dwell on his shortcomings is to ignore his mythic place in American sports history.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | January 25, 2001
LAKELAND, Fla. - Above the entrance leading into the gymnasium at Lakeland's Kathleen High School is a full-body photo of Ray Lewis after capturing a Florida state wrestling championship. After eight years, the picture is still very clear, and so is the image of Lewis in his hometown. About 30 miles from Lakeland up Interstate 4 is the greatest media circus event of the year, Super Bowl XXXV, and a Kathleen High alumnus is the featured attraction. While Lewis is being probed for answers to a double-murder case he was involved in nearly a year ago in Atlanta and his image is under siege, he is still looked upon as a hero by a lot of Lakeland residents.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 17, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- There is a moment, in the lives of some whom society holds up as idols, when private character collides with a public persona. It is at this juncture that Americans often make a jarring, unwanted discovery: Their gods have feet of clay.John F. Kennedy, we learn after his death, cheated on his wife. A bloated Elvis Presley, his body brimming with drugs, takes his last breath on a bathroom floor. Magic Johnson cuts short his brilliant basketball career, disclosing that his promiscuity is responsible for his infection with the virus that causes AIDS.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 11, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- It is a story that haunts a country, that haunts a man.Last Oct. 13, Ketil Ulvang, the oldest brother of a national sports hero, went out for a training run across a low mountain outside Kirkenes, 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle, eight miles from Russia.There was a chill wind followed by a blizzard. Ketil Ulvang never returned home and presumably was buried under the snow.Now, it is the eve of the Winter Olympics and Vegard Ulvang prepares to win a gold medal in the sport that defines the tradition of a country, the 50-kilometer cross country classical race.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 15, 2006
Young children -- especially those who are baseball fans -- doubtless will enjoy Everyone's Hero, the animated adventures of a young boy who tries to reunite Babe Ruth with his bat so that the Yankees can win the 1932 World Series. Parents, even as they groan at the film's overbearing simplicity and forced sense of whimsy, also are likely to embrace its message: Believe in yourself. Never give up. Always remember that miracles can happen. Everyone's Hero (20th Century Fox) Featuring the voices of Rob Reiner, Whoopi Goldberg, William H. Macy, Robin Williams.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2004
An agency that monitors area nonprofit groups has revoked its endorsement of a well-known Baltimore AIDS organization -- the agency's first revocation in five years -- citing several questionable practices. The Maryland Association of Nonprofit Organizations notified the Health Education Resource Organization yesterday that it had revoked its "seal of excellence" for at least a year because its review had uncovered questionable accounting practices and insufficient safeguards to prevent conflicts of interest in the way money is spent.
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