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Hero

NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 19, 2001
The trouble with Superman was that nothing could hurt him. He was stronger and faster than anybody. He had no weaknesses aside from Kryptonite; had no problems aside from Lois Lane scheming to learn his true identity. Spider-Man, on the other hand, wasn't the strongest or the fastest. Worse, he was perpetually broke, worried about his sick aunt, shunned by girls, feared by the citizenry, consumed with guilt and tortured by existential angst. Yet he always fought the good fight. We used to debate this earnestly - Walter, Darryl, Paul, Albert and I, seventh grade, John Adams Junior High - and we concluded unanimously that Spider-Man was much more the hero.
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NEWS
March 8, 1993
To: John Eric Noah Jr. of DundalkFrom: Anonymous AdmirerThat was a remarkable thing you did last month, wading again and again into the icy waters of Bear Creek in eastern Baltimore County in an attempt to save a drowning man.If an adult had made that sort of effort, people would be saying how incredibly brave he or she was. That you're only 13 makes your attempt all the more worthy of praise.Yet apparently there's even more to show just how special a young man you are: You feel bad that you couldn't save the man.According to your mom, the man's death left you thinking of yourself as "a failure."
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | August 20, 1995
His wife has an inoperable brain tumor. His younger son twice has undergone open-heart surgery. But every day is a good day, Joe Orsulak says.Every day is one more day that his wife can share with their two sons, one more day that she can smile, one more day that she can enjoy life."
FEATURES
By Susan M. Barbieri and Susan M. Barbieri,Orlando Sentinel | April 27, 1993
There are some heroes in literature who fall under the heading of loser-heroes -- those slightly pathetic, questing characters in the tradition of Saul Bellow's Tommy Wilhelm or Arthur Miller's Willy Loman. We accompany them on their valiant search for happiness, and we desperately want them to prevail.That's because there is a little Tommy and Willy in each of us. There's a little bit of Quoyle, too.Quoyle is the main character in E. Annie Proulx's outstanding new novel, "The Shipping News."
NEWS
March 10, 1993
Defining what it takes to make a hero has always been a difficult task. What measure of courage, dedication and good works qualifies?Sometimes someone comes along who leaves little doubt that he or she deserves to be called a hero. Such a person is Neil Gaffney, a Glenelg resident, whose volunteer works merit recognition as well as gratitude.Mr. Gaffney has for 10 years used his spare time to refurbish the homes of the disadvantaged and handicapped, as well as to rally local churches to house the homeless.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
In writing her latest book, Lois Nicholson had an easy time focusing on her intended audience -- the boys she worked with as librarian at Rock Hall Middle School on the Eastern Shore."
FEATURES
By Jesse Katz and Jesse Katz,Los Angeles Times | May 30, 1995
Midland, Texas -- Slumped in front of the TV, Robert O'Donnell watched the images flash by like his own life on rapid rewind.Weary firefighters. Wounded babies. A harrowing race against the clock. The scene happened to be Oklahoma City, but it was all too familiar, a traumatic reminder of the starring role Mr. O'Donnell once played in another rescue that touched the nation's heart.Seven years earlier, in what remains one of the top-rated news events in television history, the slender paramedic wriggled down an underground shaft, freeing tiny Jessica McClure after 58 fretful hours in a West Texas well.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | November 24, 2008
After 25 years, a Baltimore organization that once attracted international acclaim for its efforts to help people with AIDS is set to close its doors for good. Even now, as the Health Education Resource Organization prepares to shut down Wednesday, people from all across Baltimore keep making their way to the group's Maryland Avenue building to find assistance, and some local leaders are begging the city to do more to save its oldest and largest HIV and AIDS service provider.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | May 26, 1992
Heavily favored Newport Hero rallied from last place in a seven-horse field to win the $25,000 Miles Valentine Novice Steeplechase yesterday at Fair Hill Race Course.The 4-year-old gelding, ridden by Joe Walsh, caught his stablemate, Mort The Sport, at the 14th fence and then drew off after the 16th and final jump to beat him by four lengths. Both horses are trained by Hall of Fame steeplechase trainer W. Burling Cocks.Lexington Ball finished third. Happy Friar was a late scratch.Newport Hero is owned by Mrs. Miles Valentine, widow of the race's namesake, and ran the 2 3/8 miles in four minutes, 21 seconds.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
The Harford County Division of Emergency Operations and the County Council presented a gold 911 pin and hero's proclamation to Amber Stewart, 8, at Church Creek Elementary School Tuesday. .Amber immediately called 911 to summon the Fire Department after a fire broke out in her mother's kitchen recently, authorities said. Amber's composure during the emergency could have saved the family's apartment as well as lives, dispatcher J. Franklin Hawley said.A plastic container placed on the stove melted because of heat from the oven and caused the fire, which Amber's mother extinguished before firefighters arrived.
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