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By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
M aybe all anyone needs to know about BET's 10-part " documentary series" on Michael Vick is that the NFL quarterback's production company, MV7, is one of the producing partners. So don't expect Frederick Wiseman, the Maysles brothers or anything approaching the hard-eyed truth-telling of those legendary documentary filmmakers here - even though BET is trying to suggest such credibility by calling "The Michael Vick Project" a "documentary series." This is more like reality TV, and it is all stacked in favor of making the man who went to prison for running a brutal dogfighting operation on his Virginia farm look like a mythic figure on a heroic quest - a protagonist on an epic journey, who has suffered tremendously and is now on the comeback trail to redemption, fighting righteously against great odds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For Baltimore musician Warren Cherry, Frank Zappa was an inspiration — an artist who stubbornly went his own way and fought to protect artistic freedom. Sunday, Cherry and several hundred other Zappa fans went to Highlandtown to pay homage to the late rocker. "I've been a fan of Zappa since I was a teenager," says Cherry, 57. "He was just such an iconoclastic guy, and so unique. I mean, my gosh, just with the way he looked, with the hair and the goatee. I was an outsider, I was an artist, I was a musician.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 14, 1994
Zoran is not exactly the healthiest boy in the world: In fact, when he gets hungry, he's apt to take a spoon and literally eat the walls. A phlegmatic, sour child, a great puzzlement to his artistic parents, he lives in a crowded flat in Belgrade and for one pleasure: to serve the great Tito.The time is 1954 and the place is Yugoslavia, and Zoran, like many a youth before and many a youth after, has fallen prey to the dominant media figure of his time, who happens to be adictator and not a rock musician -- though Zoran's behavior will be familiar to any modern American parent.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 31, 2010
Maybe all anyone needs to know about BET's 10-part "documentary series" on Michael Vick is that the NFL quarterback's production company, MV7, is one of the producing partners. So don't expect Frederick Wiseman, the Maysles brothers or anything approaching the hard-eyed truth-telling of those legendary documentary filmmakers here - even though BET is trying to suggest such credibility by calling "The Michael Vick Project" a "documentary series." This is more like reality TV, and it is all stacked in favor of making the man who went to prison for running a brutal dogfighting operation on his Virginia farm look like a mythic figure on a heroic quest - a protagonist on an epic journey, who has suffered tremendously and is now on the comeback trail to redemption, fighting righteously against great odds.
FEATURES
By Michael Anft and Michael Anft,Special to The Sun | March 9, 1994
If you're a believer in the pop culture marketplace, then you nTC know that no one loves a murderer like an American does.Popular iconography includes Billy the Kid, John Dillinger, and Bonnie and Clyde. But even those deemed too weird, psychotic or unredeemable for mass hero worship -- Chessman, DeSalvo, Gacy, Bundy -- have had their followings.They are written about, read about, studied by psychiatrists, law enforcers and loners. Recently serial killers have been put on the faces of a line of trading cards.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 18, 1995
Before America gets carried away with creating its own distorted perception of Mickey Mantle, now that he's in his grave, an effort should be made to correct false impressions. It's terribly unfair -- also inaccurate -- to say he was a drunk. A %J drinker, yes. But there is a difference.Mickey Mantle never lost personal dignity or his status. And he always insisted, when asked if he played under the influence or with a hangover from the night before, that he never hurt the team. If you believe otherwise you've been misled, misinformed.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | April 20, 2008
It all started with a bit of hero worship. Little Johnny Waters was mesmerized by the teenage neighbor with the defiant pompadour. This rebel on a motorcycle inspired a cult classic film starring Johnny Depp. But, it didn't stop there. Now, Cry-Baby is headed for Broadway, after a solid year of adding and subtracting dance numbers and characters and songs, of rhyming and re-rhyming and memorizing dialogue and throwing it out, of ceaseless tweaking and second-guessing. `Cry-Baby' on Broadway Opens Thursday at the Marquis Theatre, 1535 Broadway, New York.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
A delightfully straightforward animated story about a lonely boy and the alien he befriends, "The Iron Giant" manages to be both cool and old-fashioned. It has enough science fiction and war toys for kids and enough unforced sentimentality and hero worship -- a theme that's not nearly as out of vogue as you might think -- for adults.Throw in pleas for tolerance and peaceful co-existence, and you've got a children's film with messages that parents may enjoy having their children hear.Firmly rooted in the comic-book traditions of the 1950s and 1960s, "The Iron Giant" is set in October 1957.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 13, 2005
LET'S BE honest right from the start. Before popping in the preview tape of HBO's Mantle (debut tonight at 9), I had my guard up, prepared to shrug off the documentary as just a piece of New York-centric sports mythmaking. However, Mantle is yet another terrific program from HBO. The tale of Mickey Mantle may be a familiar one to most baseball fans - and this show doesn't provide any revelations - but the story of the Yankees great is rendered gracefully and honestly. If the documentary's recounting of Mantle's baseball career occasionally lapses into dewy-eyed hero worship, it more than compensates with its story of his often sad life off the field and after his playing days.
FEATURES
By Tribune Media Services | October 15, 2007
EVER SINCE Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie made a not-so-secret appearance at the opening night of the new off-Broadway show, Jump, tickets have been selling with a bounce. The couple, now living in New York, took their children to see the martial arts comedy-spectacle from Korea. They sat quietly in the back two rows with a group of kids who were laughing through the entire performance. When they tried to make a discreet exit from the Union Square Theater, the customary swarm of cameras caught them.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | April 20, 2008
It all started with a bit of hero worship. Little Johnny Waters was mesmerized by the teenage neighbor with the defiant pompadour. This rebel on a motorcycle inspired a cult classic film starring Johnny Depp. But, it didn't stop there. Now, Cry-Baby is headed for Broadway, after a solid year of adding and subtracting dance numbers and characters and songs, of rhyming and re-rhyming and memorizing dialogue and throwing it out, of ceaseless tweaking and second-guessing. `Cry-Baby' on Broadway Opens Thursday at the Marquis Theatre, 1535 Broadway, New York.
FEATURES
By Tribune Media Services | October 15, 2007
EVER SINCE Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie made a not-so-secret appearance at the opening night of the new off-Broadway show, Jump, tickets have been selling with a bounce. The couple, now living in New York, took their children to see the martial arts comedy-spectacle from Korea. They sat quietly in the back two rows with a group of kids who were laughing through the entire performance. When they tried to make a discreet exit from the Union Square Theater, the customary swarm of cameras caught them.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and Carolyn Peirce and David Zurawik and Carolyn Peirce,sun reporters | April 23, 2007
As TV audiences go, University of Maryland senior Steve Donlin and his Delta Sigma Phi fraternity brothers are a network programmer's dream: Young, educated, technically savvy and on the brink of professional careers, they represent the demographic most resistant to television's allure and most desired by advertisers. Tonight, between 15 and 20 of them will gather in their College Park frat house to watch what the 21-year-old Donlin calls one of the biggest viewing events of the year - the return of NBC's Heroes, which has been on hiatus since March 5. Heroes NBC's Heroes airs at 9 tonight on WBAL-TV (Channel 11)
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 13, 2005
LET'S BE honest right from the start. Before popping in the preview tape of HBO's Mantle (debut tonight at 9), I had my guard up, prepared to shrug off the documentary as just a piece of New York-centric sports mythmaking. However, Mantle is yet another terrific program from HBO. The tale of Mickey Mantle may be a familiar one to most baseball fans - and this show doesn't provide any revelations - but the story of the Yankees great is rendered gracefully and honestly. If the documentary's recounting of Mantle's baseball career occasionally lapses into dewy-eyed hero worship, it more than compensates with its story of his often sad life off the field and after his playing days.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2005
There's no telling when instant fame will strike next. It happened to massage therapist Amber Frey and Army soldier Jessica Lynch in 2003. Nine Pennsylvania coal miners endured it in 2002 and Air Force pilot Scott O'Grady emerged from it a courageous hero in 1995. This week, add Ashley Smith to those ranks. The 26-year-old widowed mother in Atlanta went from total unknown to in-demand celebrity after persuading her captor Brian G. Nichols to set her free after a seven-hour hostage ordeal last weekend.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 10, 2004
JABALIYA REFUGEE CAMP, Gaza Strip -- He defied the orders of his father and the pleas of his friends and walked a few blocks from his home to watch Palestinian militants fight Israeli soldiers. Hours later, Mohammed al-Najar, 12, was dead, one side of his face sheared off by a tank shell fired at combatants during one of the fiercest battles of the weeklong Israeli incursion here. The boy died last week doing what many children do when the shooting starts -- he rushed to the masked gunmen, excited by the action, the noise, the danger.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 12, 1993
Make no mistake: When the history of our age is finally written, people will speak with awe and admiration of the Clinton Era. It's almost inevitable, really. Because beyond the expected hero worship -- the plaudits to Clinton's imagination, innovation and initiative -- it will be impossible not to acknowledge the extent to in which the Clintonian vision will have shaped the world of the future.What? No, no, not Bill and Hillary. We're talking about George Clinton.Don't worry -- it's a common mistake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For Baltimore musician Warren Cherry, Frank Zappa was an inspiration — an artist who stubbornly went his own way and fought to protect artistic freedom. Sunday, Cherry and several hundred other Zappa fans went to Highlandtown to pay homage to the late rocker. "I've been a fan of Zappa since I was a teenager," says Cherry, 57. "He was just such an iconoclastic guy, and so unique. I mean, my gosh, just with the way he looked, with the hair and the goatee. I was an outsider, I was an artist, I was a musician.
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