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By Sloane Brown | February 18, 2001
It was all there -- palm trees, swags of rope netting, and a sign announcing "Camp Kucha." Hey, was that the signature wail of a conch shell, declaring the start of the "Survivor" TV show? Nah. More the thump of disco music. This was no remote island or outback either. Rather, it was the Hippo nightclub, where no one was being voted off. In fact, folks just kept arriving at HERO's second annual spring party -- this year called Survivor Party 2001. Included in the hardy bunch of 350: Tina Lazar, event chair; Keith Pollanen, event co-chair; Anne B. Mulligan, Gary Wolnitzek, Heather Kitsko, Jenine Baker and Kristi Pettibone, event committee members; Joseph Anastasio, HERO board president; Carlton R. Smith, Lenora Davis, Wayman Merrick, Michael Miller, Rev. David Smith, and Jim Sterling, HERO board members; Dr. Leonardo Ortega, HERO executive director; Craig Wiley, Center for Poverty Solutions annual campaigns director; Gail Godwin, the Ark Northern Chesapeake Region program director; Chuck Bowers, Hippo owner; Denise Klicos, DK Salon owner; Peter Bartells, Rita St. Clair Associates interior designer; Hilary Christian, Service Coordination service coordinator; Hugh Jones, Morgan State University student; Reginald Hope, Hope Catering Co. owner; Jackie Merrick, Aramark accountant; Dr. Allan R. Rutzen, University Laser Vision Center co-director; Jon Kaplan, Image Marketing Group president; Rut Paal, Rutland Beard Florist owner; Robert Mittleman, Salon at Stevenson cosmetologist;...
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
It seems like Delmon Young has been in the major leagues for more than nine years. Maybe that's because he came to the majors so young, or maybe because he's in the postseason every year. His bat has always earned him a job. Throughout years ragged by injuries, off-the-field issues and even weight clauses in his contract, hitting has always been the easy part. After his three-run, pinch-hit double Friday afternoon led the Orioles to a 7-6 comeback win over the Detroit Tigers in Game 2 of the American League Division Series, Young was asked whether he had ice in his veins.
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NEWS
May 14, 2013
What a wonderful, warm story you published about Michael Rose nband ("Former Wall Street success finds new path reviving Carver baseball," May 11) He is a hero to all, giving up a successful job at age 40 to give back to these desiring young people. Now we should hope that our sports figures and big business owners will give back to Mr. Rosenband and his cause! We need more people like him to give our young citizens a chance in this world. Renee Di Giorgio, Ellicott City
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
When Orioles first baseman Steve Pearce was sidelined for five games last week, his absence left a big hole in the lineup. Nobody realized it more than manager Buck Showalter. "He's in a little bit different stage of his career where people are counting on him, and he's kind of become a guy that we're leaning on," Showalter said. "That's what I've tried to relay to him, that you're a valuable part of this club. " Pearce, who was released by the Orioles earlier this season - and for the first six years of his career was the definition of a replacement player - has been one of several unlikely contributors for a team that won the American League East crown and is preparing to start the postseason on Thursday at Camden Yards.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
A s fireworks erupted, we stood with tears of pride as Baltimore's blue-eyed home-run hitter took his last lap around the bases. Cal Ripken Jr. retired from baseball in the autumn of 2001, after 21 seasons and 3,001 games. With his charming combination of athletic ability and old-school work ethic, he seemed like one of the last genuine role models. A year later, we lost another great one when we buried Baltimore Colts legend John Unitas. The Hall of Fame quarterback with the golden arm died of a heart attack at 69. Baltimore might have been without a solid sports hero for a couple of years, but at the 2004 Olympics, a teen-age swimming phenom with crazy long arms and big ears splashed onto the scene.
NEWS
October 9, 2011
Steve Job's death had the same impact on the younger generation of today that the death of John F. Kennedy had on a previous generation While it is difficult to quantify the impact of one person on an entire generation, it is safe to say that the passing of Steve Jobs had the same impact on the younger generation of today that the death of John F. Kennedy had on a previous generation. For those who witnessed both events, we will always remember where we were and what we were doing when both of these heroes passed on. Paul Jankovic, Bethany Beach, Del.
NEWS
August 27, 2011
I was saddened to learn of the death of John Burleigh ("Civil rights activist helped organize demonstration at Gwynn Oak Park, was active in CORE," July 20). He was an unsung hero of the civil rights struggle. The purpose of this letter is to fill in some of the gaps in his obituary. I first met John in the early 1960s when he organized a demonstration that took place in front of the Social Security headquarters to protest the agency's racially discriminatory hiring and promotion practices.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
You missed a teachable moment in your front-page report on the St. Maurice Award of Merit conferred on Maryland's "vanishing warriors" ( "Honoring World War II foot soldiers," Jan. 13). Nowhere was there any reference to the individual for whom the award was originally named. He was a remarkable African general who did not bow to the will of the Romans and was featured in the 2012 Walters Art Museum exhibition "Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe. " The exhibit was an overwhelming success among Baltimoreans and regional visitors.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
I was pleased to read your recent article regarding the lawsuit against Ticketmaster ("City politicians rush to save Ticketmaster's user fees," Feb. 24). I now know who to thank: Kudos to Andre Bourgeois for bringing the suit and winning the case. I attend many productions in Baltimore, be they at the Meyerhoff, the Lyric or elsewhere around town. But I will never go to any event unless I can buy a ticket at the box office. Every company is entitled to make a profit for its services, but the exorbitant fees tacked onto tickets by Ticketmaster, which I refuse to pay, are pure gouging.
NEWS
June 8, 2011
Dearest Sarah, You are my hero! It would have been so easy to say, "Oops, I misspoke. You see, I've been on the road, I haven't slept much, and I have this terrible fire in the belly. Of course, Paul Revere wasn't warning the British…" But no. You stuck to your story with, "I know my American history. " What do those Bostonians know about Paul Revere anyway? The important thing here is that you looked so attractive while saying it! Where were you, Sarah Palin, when I was getting a "D" in American history in college?
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Here's a course to please the students who hid comic books in their textbooks. University of Baltimore will offer a spring course on the world of Marvel super heroes. The course will examine how the comics, films and TV shows "offer important insights into modern culture," according to a university news release. Students in "Media Genres: Media Marvels" will delve into the appeal of superheroes such as Spider-Man, Captain America, the X-Men and the Incredible Hulk. They will discuss the implications of fictional apocalyptic threats and study Joseph Campbell's explanation of the hero archetype.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 25, 2014
Does the president think the world is a TV show? One of the things you learn watching television as a kid is that the hero wins. No matter how dire things look, the star is going to be OK. MacGyver always defuses the bomb with some saltwater taffy before the timer reaches zero. There was no way Fonzie was going to mess up his water-ski jump and get devoured by sharks. Life doesn't actually work like that. That's one reason HBO's "Game of Thrones" is so compelling. Despite being set in an absurd fantasy world of giants, dragons and ice zombies, it's more realistic than a lot of dramas set in a more plausible universe in at least one regard.
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | August 14, 2014
Although the summer season still has a few weeks left, the box office take thus far suggests that Hollywood's string of consecutive records likely ended last summer. While consumer tastes are notoriously fickle in the entertainment industry, I do give credit to Hollywood for trying to give consumers more of what they have wanted in the past. So, this season, we welcomed back old friends in new displays of derring-do as they saved humanity from various foes. There was Captain America appearing with the Winter Soldier, Falcon and the Black Widow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
The long relationship between HBO and David Simon will continue with the Baltimore filmmaker co-writing and producing "Show Me a Hero," a six-hour miniseries, for the premium cable channel. Based on the non-fiction book of the same title by Lisa Belkin, the series that explores race relations in the 1980s and '90s in Yonkers, N.Y.,  will star Oscar Isaac and Catherine Keener. Simon said in an email to The Sun that the miniseries will be filmed in Yonkers, because that's where the real-life events it covers took place.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 13, 2014
Just two pages into the book "Unbroken," its protagonist is in the water, hiding beneath the deteriorating life raft in which he has been drifting across the Pacific Ocean for almost a month. Overhead, Japanese bombers are circling back to strafe him a second time. And sharks are approaching from below. Death is coming for him from two directions, and your impulse is to verify that this is not a novel, not some outlandish fiction from the Indiana Jones School of Narrow Escapes.
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | July 3, 2014
The celebration of America's birthday rarely includes references to Thomas Paine, the author of the pre-Revolutionary War pamphlet "Common Sense. " But Paine's role in the break with Great Britain was important, and his life has a way of reminding us that our nation has had enormous tolerance for wayward individuals - a sobering contrast to the consistent propriety exemplified by history-makers such as George Washington or John Adams. Paine was born in 1737 in Thetford, a village 70 miles northeast of London, the son of a staymaker or corsetmaker.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
I am saddened by the presentation of Ray Lewis of the Ravens as a hero. He is nothing more than a very talented athlete ("Ray's day," Jan. 7). Where are our priorities? Ray Lewis has six children by four different mothers, skated away from his 2000 manslaughter debacle by snitching on his "friends," and four years later settled out of court with the families of the two men that were killed in the bar brawl. The clothes he wore that night were never found. He loves to say that he is a Christian.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | May 16, 2012
Joe Cummings' game-winning goal with six seconds left in the fourth quarter propelled Maryland to a 10-9 upset of No. 7 seed Lehigh in a NCAA tournament first-round contest Sunday night and a quarterfinal date with No. 2 seed Johns Hopkins. But the senior attackman said the true heroics were provided by senior midfielder Drew Snider, who scored two of his game-high three goals in the fourth quarter and collected a key ground ball that set up Cummings' score. “I can't take that credit,” the Towson native and Loyola graduate said Tuesday when asked about being the Terps' hero.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
While the offense struggled for most of the Orioles' 5-4 win in 12 innings over the Chicago White Sox on Wednesday, Nick Markakis had no difficulty getting on base all night. The right fielder matched a season-high with four hits and scored a run as the Orioles completed their second walk-off victory of the series on a wild pitch in the 12th inning. The winning play was set up by Markakis' line drive single to the gap in right-center field, which nearly scored pinch-runner David Lough.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
In the early days of the AIDS epidemic, when nobody knew what HIV was or how it was spread, few people in Baltimore were willing to go out of their way to help those dying of the disease. Tom Patrick was one of the willing -- still is, in fact -- and will be honored for that commitment this weekend, as grand marshal of the Baltimore Pride parade. "It's going to be a hoot," said Patrick, 65, who for the last 24 years has worked to deliver free meals and other services to the sick and dying of Baltimore with the nonprofit Moveable Feast . The group is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, and Patrick -- its longtime volunteer manager -- is about to retire, said Ted Blankenship, the group's development director.
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