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NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | July 26, 2013
Three heritage tourism projects in the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway area have been awarded nearly $140,000 in matching grants from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority, the Greenway organization announced. A $20,000 grant was awarded to the City of Havre de Grace for Concord Point Park. The grant will support the engineering, site work and utility costs to extend the length of the Promenade (part of the Greenway Trail) across newly acquired property adjacent to Concord Point Park.
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NEWS
October 24, 2013
There was no "misperception" about Patapsco Heritage Greenway. The Friends of Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway organization tried to create a Maryland Heritage Tourism Area by that name back in the 1990s. As I understand it, by 2000, numerous local environmental and community groups opposed the certification, Howard and Baltimore County withdrew support and the Sierra Club brought a lawsuit against it. After settling the lawsuit out of court, the Friends spent 13 years clearing trash and garlic mustard out of Patapsco Valley State Park.
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NEWS
October 24, 2002
DARLINGTON - Mary Ann Lisanti, former city manager of Havre de Grace, has been named executive director of the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway, a nonprofit organization that promotes heritage tourism and trail development in Harford and Cecil counties. Lisanti replaces Beverly Litsinger of Randallstown, whose nine-month contract was close to expiring when she decided to leave to work on a book about haunted sites in Maryland. The greenway's focus area includes nearly 45,000 acres along the Susquehanna River, from just north of Conowingo Dam to the head of the Chesapeake Bay and includes the towns of Port Deposit, Havre de Grace and Perryville.
NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | July 26, 2013
Three heritage tourism projects in the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway area have been awarded nearly $140,000 in matching grants from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority, the Greenway organization announced. A $20,000 grant was awarded to the City of Havre de Grace for Concord Point Park. The grant will support the engineering, site work and utility costs to extend the length of the Promenade (part of the Greenway Trail) across newly acquired property adjacent to Concord Point Park.
NEWS
August 28, 1996
HERE'S A new buzz word for the '90s: heritage tourism. The state government recognizes that one way to draw visitors to Maryland is to showcase the legacy of various ethnic groups, and localities are getting into the act as well.Annapolis is in the forefront of this trend. Last year, a guide booklet, "The African American Heritage in Annapolis," was published. This spawned walking tours of the 300-year-old city by the Historic Annapolis Foundation with a special emphasis on black landmarks.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
Hoping to pique the interest of some of the millions of tourists who each year visit Anne Arundel County, the Galesville Heritage Society has published a brochure highlighting some of the maritime community's top historical and cultural attractions. The four-color brochure lists 23 heritage tour sites within the waterfront community in southern Anne Arundel, including many that date to the 1800s. The West River Market, at 1000 Main St., is one of the sites along the tour. It opened in the mid-1800s as a general store and has been converted into an art gallery and antiques shop.
NEWS
March 17, 1996
QUICK. WHAT IS the second biggest tourism draw for Maryland? Here's a hint: No. 1 is water recreation and the Chesapeake Bay. No. 2 is not the Orioles or Cal Ripken.No, the second-most popular activity that lures tourists here is visiting historic sites, museums and other landmarks. In a state survey, four times as many people said they come to Maryland for its "heritage" attractions as are drawn here by professional sports.Such draws are quiet engines of economic growth. Yet even in a good year, state government spends very little to boost the visibility and attractiveness of these locales.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
Westminster officials have agreed to join a three-county effort to lure tourists to sites that played a supporting role in the drama of the Civil War.The Common Council voted Monday night to participate in a proposal by Carroll, Frederick and Washington counties to seek heritage tourism recognition from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority. Recognition will allow the three counties and participating towns to qualify for grants financing Civil War-related projects.The idea is to tap the lucrative historic tourism movement by getting tourists who have visited the Gettysburg or Antietam battlefields to retrace troop movements, marches and bivouacs.
NEWS
May 13, 1998
ITS ATTRACTIONS and beauty are so varied that Maryland has long claimed to be America in miniature. As far as tourism goes, though, there is little reason for smugness. Visitors coming here do not spend as much or stay as long as the national average.A program started two years ago is trying to change that.So far, eight historic areas in Maryland have submitted blueprints for developing heritage tourism over the next 10 years and are hoping for matching funds from the state.The goal: Lure visitors to lesser-known ethnic and specialized attractions that will round out their itineraries and lengthen their stays.
NEWS
By Pamela Charshee | January 10, 2008
What is the price of history? It's impossible to figure. But we are nagged by that question with news of the impending sale of the President Street station - the sale of Baltimore's Civil War history. Baltimore is rich in historical structures (it's the "Monumental City," right?) and studded with an array of heritage venues that other cities should envy over their potential for tourism development. Why, in a town steeped in history going back to Colonial times, is its premier Civil War museum on the chopping block - and why have so many other small historical attractions dropped off the map in recent years?
NEWS
By Pamela Charshee | January 10, 2008
What is the price of history? It's impossible to figure. But we are nagged by that question with news of the impending sale of the President Street station - the sale of Baltimore's Civil War history. Baltimore is rich in historical structures (it's the "Monumental City," right?) and studded with an array of heritage venues that other cities should envy over their potential for tourism development. Why, in a town steeped in history going back to Colonial times, is its premier Civil War museum on the chopping block - and why have so many other small historical attractions dropped off the map in recent years?
NEWS
December 21, 2007
Donna Dudley, executive director of Four Rivers: The Heritage Area of Annapolis, London Town & South County, has resigned to assume a new position as chief of tourism for Charles County, according to the Four Rivers Board of Directors. Dudley, Four Rivers' executive director since 2002, has brought more than $1.68 million in matching Maryland Heritage Areas Authority funding into the community. This funding has supported major projects at Historic London Town & Gardens, Historic Annapolis Foundation, Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Conference & Visitors Bureau, and the Annapolis Maritime Museum.
NEWS
By HEATHER GEHLERT and HEATHER GEHLERT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2006
FREDERICKSBURG, Va. -- Inferiority, servitude and racism are a few of the words that Vonita W. Foster uses when she travels to middle schools and high schools to teach students about slavery - a subject that, more than 140 years after its end, still makes black students squirm. Foster is on a mission to change that. She has become a driving force in creating the United States' first national museum dedicated to slavery. With 290,000 square feet of space and a $200 million budget, the U.S. National Slavery Museum, scheduled to open here in 2008, is a high-end example of a growing market trend, as the tourism industry realizes the popularity and profitability of opening and re-examining one of American history's ugliest scars.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
Hoping to pique the interest of some of the millions of tourists who each year visit Anne Arundel County, the Galesville Heritage Society has published a brochure highlighting some of the maritime community's top historical and cultural attractions. The four-color brochure lists 23 heritage tour sites within the waterfront community in southern Anne Arundel, including many that date to the 1800s. The West River Market, at 1000 Main St., is one of the sites along the tour. It opened in the mid-1800s as a general store and has been converted into an art gallery and antiques shop.
TRAVEL
By Martha Stevenson and Martha Stevenson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2003
Study the past if you would divine the future." So said Confucius, and these days more and more Americans are interested in where they come from. Heritage tourism is gaining momentum. According to a recent study by the Travel Industry Association of America and Smithsonian Magazine, tourists who seek out history and culture (118 million last year, up 13 percent from 1996) spend more, do more and stay longer than other travelers. Interest in African-American history, the civil rights movement, women's rights, Native American culture, the Civil and Revolutionary wars, and the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition are all helping to fuel domestic travel.
NEWS
October 27, 2002
Patapsco park better without tourism area In its coverage of the long-running controversy over development in the Patapsco Valley State Park (the so-called Patapsco Heritage "Greenway" project), The Sun unfortunately continues to perpetuate a series of myths which confuse rather than inform readers about this critical issue. The Sierra Club is spearheading the protection effort in the Patapsco Valley, but it is doing so in full alliance with the Audubon Society of Central Maryland, the Patapsco Chapter of Trout Unlimited, and the overarching umbrella group, the Maryland Conservation Council.
NEWS
December 21, 2007
Donna Dudley, executive director of Four Rivers: The Heritage Area of Annapolis, London Town & South County, has resigned to assume a new position as chief of tourism for Charles County, according to the Four Rivers Board of Directors. Dudley, Four Rivers' executive director since 2002, has brought more than $1.68 million in matching Maryland Heritage Areas Authority funding into the community. This funding has supported major projects at Historic London Town & Gardens, Historic Annapolis Foundation, Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Conference & Visitors Bureau, and the Annapolis Maritime Museum.
NEWS
By HEATHER GEHLERT and HEATHER GEHLERT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2006
FREDERICKSBURG, Va. -- Inferiority, servitude and racism are a few of the words that Vonita W. Foster uses when she travels to middle schools and high schools to teach students about slavery - a subject that, more than 140 years after its end, still makes black students squirm. Foster is on a mission to change that. She has become a driving force in creating the United States' first national museum dedicated to slavery. With 290,000 square feet of space and a $200 million budget, the U.S. National Slavery Museum, scheduled to open here in 2008, is a high-end example of a growing market trend, as the tourism industry realizes the popularity and profitability of opening and re-examining one of American history's ugliest scars.
NEWS
October 24, 2002
DARLINGTON - Mary Ann Lisanti, former city manager of Havre de Grace, has been named executive director of the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway, a nonprofit organization that promotes heritage tourism and trail development in Harford and Cecil counties. Lisanti replaces Beverly Litsinger of Randallstown, whose nine-month contract was close to expiring when she decided to leave to work on a book about haunted sites in Maryland. The greenway's focus area includes nearly 45,000 acres along the Susquehanna River, from just north of Conowingo Dam to the head of the Chesapeake Bay and includes the towns of Port Deposit, Havre de Grace and Perryville.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
With concerns that memorial services for last year's terrorist attacks will keep people from traveling next month, the Howard County Tourism Council is starting to plan events to help the industry. The group has expanded its heritage tourism week to a month, with activities designed to attract regional travelers. The council hopes the activities will help several businesses in the industry, which lost millions of dollars to travelers' fears last year. The list of events includes Historic Ellicott City Decorators Showhouse from Sept.
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