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By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A split between conservatives and the Bush administration deepened yesterday as a leading conservative think tank issued a report that strongly criticized President Bush's leadership.The Heritage Foundation, in its annual "State of Conservatism" report, accused Mr. Bush of abandoning the low-tax, anti-regulation agenda of the Reagan years and allowing Washington's "power elite" to dictate public policy."We know Ronald Reagan, and George Bush has shown he is no Ronald Reagan," said Edwin J. Feulner Jr., president of the Washington-based think tank.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 30, 2013
It's Obamacare activation and government "shutdown" week in Washington, where the consequences of misplaced faith in government are everywhere. Still, "true believers" remain faithful that Obamacare will be the exception to government's past failures in achieving big goals. There are examples galore of government's inability to do things well and at reasonable cost, but that doesn't deter those who continue to believe government can solve every problem. The U.S. Postal Service wants to raise the cost of a first-class stamp from 46 cents to 49 cents in order to cover a "precarious financial condition.
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NEWS
By Norman Solomon | August 2, 1998
On Capitol Hill one day in late February 1995, a subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific heard testimony from Edwin J. Feulner Jr., the president of the Heritage Foundation. The witness praised South Korea as a key ally of the United States and urged closer cooperation between Washington and Seoul. And he criticized the Clinton administration for being too conciliatory toward the regime in North Korea.Feulner's testimony was unremarkable, except that it did not mention a pertinent fact: His organization was in the midst of receiving large amounts of money from the South Korean government.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
As a businessman I read The Sun to be informed and educated, not for snide and misinformed comments such as those in commentator Matt Patterson's piece on the nomination of Thomas Perez as labor secretary ("Why do we need a labor department?" March 22). It was difficult to determine whether the author meant to be taken seriously. To suggest that we don't need an agency to look out for the interests of workers, when their jobs have so often been shipped overseas and their salaries are stagnant at a time of record corporate profits that primarily benefit shareholders, is simply foolish.
NEWS
By TRB | September 2, 1993
Washington. -- Like many Washington journalists, I get two or three broadsides a day from the Heritage Foundation, Washington's leading conservative think tank.They come in a profusion of categories, with somewhat less variety in themes: Heritage Foundation News (''Economist CallsClinton Economic Plan Dishonest, Deceptive''); Heritage Foundation Backgrounder (''Advantage Incumbents: Clinton's Campaign Finance Proposal''); Issue Bulletin (''Six Reasons Why Bill Clinton's National Service Program Is a Bad Idea'')
NEWS
June 4, 1991
The chief deputy clerk of the county Circuit Court has resigned to take a job with the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C.Robert E. Moffit's resignation becomes effective June 10, Clerk of Court Mary M. Rose said yesterday. She said Moffit,45, of Severna Park, has accepted an offer to become deputy directorof domestic policy for the Heritage Foundation.Moffit, whose last day of work at the courthouse was Friday, was vacationing in Florida yesterday and was unavailable for comment.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
As a businessman I read The Sun to be informed and educated, not for snide and misinformed comments such as those in commentator Matt Patterson's piece on the nomination of Thomas Perez as labor secretary ("Why do we need a labor department?" March 22). It was difficult to determine whether the author meant to be taken seriously. To suggest that we don't need an agency to look out for the interests of workers, when their jobs have so often been shipped overseas and their salaries are stagnant at a time of record corporate profits that primarily benefit shareholders, is simply foolish.
NEWS
August 16, 1991
The folks who brought us Reaganomics are giving a new definition to the term chutzpah -- the Yiddish word for unmitigated effrontery -- as they celebrate the 10th anniversary this week of the economic policy which promised us lower taxes, higher military spending and balanced budgets all in one beautiful package.Among those throwing a big birthday party was the Heritage Foundation, which was a sort of intellectual fountainhead of supply-side economics policies. Judging from news accounts of the bash, however, no one pointed out that the price of the tax cut was a tripling of the national debt, or the point that today 27 cents out of every dollar in revenue taken in by the U.S. government, excluding Social Security taxes, now goes for interest on debt.
NEWS
By JOAN BECK | July 16, 1995
Chicago. -- Welfare has an appalling price tag -- reason enough for Congress to be debating its future in the next few weeks. It also has a haunting human face -- reason enough to make cutbacks dauntingly difficult.The numbers alone are staggering. The nation has spent $5.4 trillion on welfare since 1965.That's enough, says the Heritage Foundation, to ''buy every factory, all the manufacturing equipment and every office building in the United States'' along with ''every airline, railroad, trucking firm, telephone, television, radio, power company, hotel, retail and wholesale store in the nation, plus the entire commercial maritime fleet.
NEWS
May 21, 2000
IT'S A POOR WAY to govern. Republicans running Congress have a phobia about gaining partisan advantage over Democrat Bill Clinton. The result: Hastily passed laws designed to embarrass and punish the Clinton administration have become costly, wasteful duds. And the GOP's determination to put politics ahead of sound governance has led to a record number of judicial vacancies. As The Sun's Jonathan Weisman reported recently, too-hasty lawmaking to address scandals has had unintended and harmful consequences: Bans on trade with China, designed to halt transfer of missile technology, ended up staggering the U.S. satellite-manufacturing business instead.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 10, 2012
In a profession like politics and in a town like the nation's capital, the phenomenon of a U.S. senator voluntarily surrendering his seat for a think-tank job would have been unthinkable some years ago. The decision of Republican Jim DeMint of South Carolina, founder of the Senate Tea Party Caucus and darling of true-believing ultraconservatives, to chuck his Senate seat during his second six-year term is a measure of the growing influence of...
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 14, 2012
Meet "Julia. " She is the star of an infographic created for President Barack Obama's re-election website to illustrate the policy differences between him and Republican challenger Mitt Romney. The slide show follows Julia from the age of 3, when her parents enroll her in a Head Start program, through college, paid for by government-subsidized loans, through the birth of her own child, with lots of free maternity care, to a retirement cushioned by Medicare and Social Security.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 5, 2009
So I did the cash-for-clunkers deal, and I am a happy citizen today. I have a new car that gets twice the mileage of the 10-year-old minivan that I hadn't been driving much anymore anyway - it had failed a Maryland emissions test and needed a costly repair - and I don't even feel that guilty about taking the government's money. I mean, if the guys at AIG didn't, why should I? I got $4,500 for a worthless vehicle with 212,308 miles on it, a bad cough, a rip in the tacky steering wheel pad and tires that looked like Nick Markakis' head.
NEWS
October 27, 2008
How did Greenspan miss warning signs? For most of the last two decades, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan guided the fiscal policy of this country. He was responsible for the cheap-money policy that fueled the explosive growth of the housing market. So I was astounded to hear his testimony at the congressional hearings Thursday on the fiscal crises this country is facing ("Market puzzle," Oct. 24). How could the chairman of the Federal Reserve have failed to realize that the cheap-money policy that he championed, the low interest rates he promoted and the explosive appreciation of housing prices would not ultimately end in financial disaster?
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | January 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Conservative Republicans, out of power in Congress for the first time in 12 years, will return to Baltimore tomorrow for a three-day retreat featuring pep talks by such movement lights as former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former House Majority Leader Dick Armey and former Sen. Phil Gramm. On Friday, the members of the House Republican Study Committee will hear a pitch from former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who has been courting conservative leaders in his run for the Republican presidential nomination.
NEWS
By Naftali Bendavid and Naftali Bendavid,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 7, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Liberal activists, frustrated by what they see as powerful conservative voices in the media -- including Rush Limbaugh, Fox News Channel and the Heritage Foundation -- have begun creating institutions they hope will compete with conservatives in churning out appealing policy ideas. The creations range from a think tank headed by former President Bill Clinton's chief of staff to a nascent liberal radio network to a legal society designed to offset the influential Federalist Society.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- An influential conservative adviser on civil rights to the Bush administration has issued a manifesto castigating hard-line conservatives in the White House for failing to promote in Congress a "bold new strategy" that President Bush approved two months ago.Clint Bolick, director of the Washington-based Landmark Center for Civil Rights, has written in a revealing 15-page paper that advocates of the new strategy -- including advisers such as...
NEWS
May 11, 2003
Community College offers World War II lectures this month Carroll Community College will present two speakers who will discuss World War II and the Holocaust. Bill Schroeder will discuss propaganda and insights into the rise of Adolf Hitler he gained while researching his new book, In der Fuehrer's Face at 5 p.m. Wednesday in Room L287 of the 1601 Washington Road campus. The first part of the presentation will deal with a trip to the Library of Congress where he discovered a unique American propaganda program using poker playing cards as an anti-Axis propaganda vehicle and why it was never used.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush said yesterday that the grand experiment of democracy must succeed in Iraq and Afghanistan, not just for the sake of the people in those countries but to protect the national security of the United States. "Our mission in Afghanistan and Iraq is clear to our service members - and clear to our enemies," Bush said in a speech before the Heritage Foundation. Marking Veterans Day by praising the valor of American fighting men and women across the years, Bush said the people serving in Afghanistan and Iraq today are helping "democracy, peace and justice rise in a violent and troubled region."
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | October 17, 2003
WASHINGTON -- There was a headline that grabbed me in The New York Times Saturday. It said, "Cheney Lashes Out at Critics of Policy on Iraq." "Wow," I thought, "that must have been an interesting encounter." Then I read the fine print. Mr. Cheney was speaking to 200 invited guests at the conservative Heritage Foundation -- and even they were not allowed to ask any questions. Great. Osama bin Laden and Saddam Hussein issue messages from their caves through Al-Jazeera, and Mr. Cheney issues messages from his bunker through Fox News.
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