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June 23, 2005
When: 1 p.m.-10 p.m. tomorrow, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday Where: Oriole Park at Camden Yards, 33 W. Camden St. Admission: Free, but donations are accepted Information: 410-318-8286 or www.aahf.net Tomorrow marks the kickoff of the fourth annual African American Heritage Festival. Musical acts -- including headliners India.Arie, Doug E. Fresh, Mint Condition and Faith Evans -- abound throughout the festival, but there are many other attractions, including a health fair, children's corner and a History, Education and Art tent.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
Lloyd Campbell "Mitch" Mitchner, who had been director of Baltimore's Urban Services Agency during the mayoral administration of Kurt L. Schmoke and later headed AFRAM, the African-American cultural festival, died July 16 of lung cancer at Northwest Hospital. He was 84. "I've known Lloyd since I was a teenager when he and my mother and Barbara Mikulski were social workers for the Baltimore City Department of Social Services," said Mr. Schmoke, former dean of the Howard University Law School, who is now university vice president and general counsel.
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FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | May 24, 1992
America's diverse culture will be explored next weekend as "Yorktown Sampler: An American Heritage Festival" is presented the Yorktown Victory Center at Yorktown, Va.This year's event has been expanded with two outdoor stage areas, featuring first-person interpretations, music and dance performances, crafts demonstrations, ethnic foods and children's activities.Through first-person interpretations you can learn about life for the 18th century African-American, early American farming, American Indian building techniques, mountain folklore, and military life during the Revolutionary and Civil wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Al Shipley, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Charlie Wilson has been alive for 58 years, and has been singing for nearly all of them — first in his church choir and then in the Gap Band, the pioneering funk group he formed at the age of 14 with his brothers Ronnie and Robert. That long, remarkable career has reached an unlikely new peak with Wilson's success as a solo artist. This weekend, he'll be headlining the African American Heritage Festival on a bill that includes other R&B acts Chrisette Michele, Estelle and Lil Mo. Wilson credits his continued good fortune to his instrument.
NEWS
September 18, 1991
The observances for the fifth annual Kunta Kinte Commemoration and Heritage Festival start tomorrow at the Holiday Inn in Annapolis Thursday and conclude Saturday and Sunday, with a variety of events in theBaltimore area and Annapolis.The high point of the festivities will be a Melba Moore concert Sept. 28 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis, with a reception to follow.The event, intended to reaffirm the importance of the African-American community as a medium for social change and self-improvement, has as its theme: "With Faith, We are Family."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 10, 2002
For the 15th year, Annapolis residents and others from around the region will gather in the name of a slave to celebrate African, African-American and Caribbean culture. The Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival - named for the slave-ancestor of Roots author Alex Haley who is believed to have arrived in Annapolis in 1767 - will run from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. tomorrow near the water on the campus of St. John's College. "I think it is important that we know our descendants are still alive in spirit, and they have left a legacy for us to fulfill," said Renee Spears, co-chairwoman of the festival's entertainment committee.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 1999
Sunday was one of those special days when an afternoon in Annapolis seemed the very soul of gracious living.It was cool -- by this summer's standards, anyway -- and the ambience was perfect for exploring the 12th Annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival on the rolling lawns of St. John's College.Kudos to Thomas E. "Tea" Arthur, the board of directors' chair, and to event chairwomen Jean Jackson and Dorothy Medley, who created a bright, attractive festival.One delight was the performance of "Myklar the Ordinary," a magician whose tricks and affirming commentary directed at the youngsters were anything but run-of-the-mill.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2003
Sheila Daniels concedes that she took her 9-year-old son Donte to the African-American Heritage Festival yesterday in part because she wanted something to do. But there was another reason as well. "For me to learn and for him to also learn about his heritage," said the resident of Federal Hill, as she sat on a bench outside the history and education tent. "I think everybody should know that." After shutting down early Saturday because of heavy rain, the free outdoor festival at Camden Yards was in full swing again yesterday, with musicians on stage, lots of food on the grill and visitors young and old back for a celebration of African-American history and culture.
FEATURES
By RASHOD OLLISON and RASHOD OLLISON,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 19, 2006
In a way, the combination made sense. Erykah Badu and Chaka Khan, two of the most idiosyncratic and subtly innovative artists in soul, headlined the fifth annual African American Heritage Festival at Camden Yards Saturday and last nights, respectively. In her own time, each artist has extended and flipped her musical influences. When Badu broke out in 1997, the Dallas native was unlike any female R&B vocalist before her. Yet her vocal approach (a vinegary Diana Ross tossed with sweeter elements of Billie Holiday)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2002
The slogan of the inaugural African-American Heritage Festival is "Come see who we are" -- and event organizers mean that literally. "It's the heritage of the African-American culture -- past, present and future," says festival spokeswoman Mary Wright. "And it's the first time for the African-American Heritage Festival, so we want people to come see who we are." The three-day family-focused event, which starts tomorrow at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, will emphasize the arts, education, entertainment and African-American contributions to Baltimore and society as a whole.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Among the acts making a joyful noise at this weekend's African American Heritage Festival is a choir consisting of workers from a corporation known for its department stores. The Sears Holdings Associate Gospel Choir, a collection of employees from the national chain's corporate headquarters in suburban Chicago, is one of the many attractions at this year's ninth annual celebration of culture, arts and entertainment. There's much to see and do at the three-day festival, which draws about a half-million people annually and has become a popular venue for outdoor entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Paula Campbell seldom resists the opportunity to lift her voice in song. The R&B soloist from Baltimore recently followed a one-hour set at a D.C. lounge with an impromptu, keeping-it-real performance backstage. The latter performance came while she was getting her hair done. "At the end of the day, you have to do what you have to do," said Campbell, who is among several local recording artists who will be performing at this weekend's African American Heritage Festival. The family- oriented celebration of African-American history, culture and arts is in its ninth year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | June 26, 2008
Eric Roberson saw the writing on the wall early. In the mid-'90s, the soul singer-songwriter was signed to Warner Bros. Records. But after an executive turnover at the label, he was unceremoniously dropped from the roster, and an album he recorded for the company never saw the light of CD shops. Then he landed another major-label deal - this time with Island Records. But the same thing happened: An executive shakedown left him without a contract. Understandably frustrated, Roberson saw only one way to go. "I had a front-row seat to how things happen in the industry," says the artist, who performs Sunday night on Stage B at the African American Heritage Festival in Camden Yards.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
Heritage festival -- The 20th annual Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday at the Anne Arundel County Fairgrounds, 1450 Generals Highway, Crownsville. The event will include ethnic and heritage crafts, folktales, mask-making workshops, children's games, drumming and instrument-making. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors, $4 for children ages 4 to 12 and free for children age 3 and younger. The event will be held rain or shine.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
It was nearly 1 p.m. and Kia Calloway was nowhere to be found. "Kia Calloway is on her way," said the band onstage, which kept announcing her impending arrival. "She should be here shortly." Another few minutes and the organizers at the African American Heritage Festival were going to have to cancel her slot, they said. She was one of about 10 performers tightly scheduled on the main stage yesterday, the last being none other than renowned R&B singer Patti LaBelle. And then, just in time, there Calloway was. In a short, clingy peach dress and gold spiky heels, the 24-year-old was gulping water and rushing to get on stage after fighting her way through traffic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | July 5, 2007
Never mind that the sun is usually merciless and there's hardly any shade in Camden Yards, the site for the African American Heritage Festival every summer since 2002. The event, which starts tomorrow and ends Sunday evening, is all about having a funky good time with family and friends. Vendors sell ornate African masks and unique jewelry. Flavorful foods abound: barbecue, fried catfish, grilled chicken kebabs. And you can wash it all down with lemonade extra-sweetened with pineapple chunks and maraschino cherries.
FEATURES
By Syd Kearney and Syd Kearney,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | March 10, 1996
You can have Mardi Gras beads and king cakes. The real party here is the annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, scheduled April 26 to May 5 this year.What started in 1970 as a small gathering of about 150 music lovers has grown to a 400,000-strong party with entertainment by some of music's biggest names. Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, James Taylor, Los Lobos and Blues Travelers were among the more than 4,000 musicians who serenaded crowds last year on the infield of the Fair Grounds Race Track.
NEWS
July 2, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Packing it in The advent of warehouse stores has made Americans a nation of supersize buyers. Today baltimoresun.com/cowherd Resetting priorities Professional wrestler Chris Benoit's death shows that the ramifications of steroid abuse go far beyond playing fields and the sanctity of record books. Sports baltimoresun.com/steele OTHER VOICES Michael Dresser on traffic dangersMaryland 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Carnival in Tydings Park -- Get an early start on celebrating Independence Day with this festival, which includes rides and more.
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