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NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 1997
WHO BETTER TO help organize a house tour in a quaint old town than the local heritage committee?That's the theory in Union Bridge, where the town's heritage committee is joining Union Bridge United Methodist Church Women to sponsor a tour of nine houses and three churches Saturday.The tour runs from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m., with the start at the Methodist church at 7 S. Main St. The United Methodist women's group will serve meals from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m.Cost is $5. Booklets with descriptions of the houses and churches and a map will be included.
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By Katie V. Jones | June 6, 2011
A home and garden tour on Sunday, June 12, in New Windsor will showcase six homes and five gardens. It will also feature an idea Dori Batavick thought added charm to a garden tour she attended in Delaware — namely, artists.. "In several of the gardens, they had … an artist," Batavick said. "I thought it was just wonderful. I thought it added something to the tour. " So, when planning began in earnest for the New Windsor Heritage Committee's first home and garden tour, Batavick suggested adding area artists to the mix. Before long, she had several artists, jewelry makers and two quilters willing to participate.
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NEWS
August 13, 1993
New Windsor planning fete for 150th birthdayThe New Windsor Heritage Committee needs volunteers to help plan the town's 150th anniversary celebration.Various committees are needed to organize the events, which start in January, Heritage Committee President Micki Smith said.The sesquicentennial ceremony will consist of several events throughout the year.Ideas include a 19th-century music concert, a "museum tour" -- possible held at Boxwood Antiques, one of the oldest buildings in town -- with photos and antiques, and a "Sesquicentennial Dinner" with residents attending in period costumes.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2008
Originally settled as a farming community in the 1700s and later known as Buttersburg because the town's general store operator would take local butter for payment on goods, Union Bridge didn't get its current name until 1820. This came after a bridge was built over the Pipe Creek and swampland. Because residents on both sides of the bridge pitched in to help, it became known as Union Bridge. Today the sleepy country town located just 11 miles outside Westminster in rural Carroll County offers residents an amiable retreat.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
The Union Bridge Town Council agreed to a 1-cent increase in the town's property tax rate last night when it approved a $398,500 budget for fiscal 1995.The tax rate increase is the second that the Town Council has approved for Union Bridge in two years.Last night's council meeting also served as the public hearing for residents to comment on the budget, which was introduced during the April 25 council session.Mayor Perry L. Jones Jr. proposed the tax increase as a way for the town to make up the money it will lose by levying less tax against Lehigh Portland Cement Co. as the result of two court decisions last year.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | January 7, 1993
The Union Bridge Town Council will have a special meeting tonight to discuss replacements for departing member Jeff Six, who resigned during the Dec. 28 meeting.Mr. Six, a heavy-machine operator for Lehigh Portland Cement, is moving out of town and will be unable to finish the rest of his second term, which ends in May 1995.Town Clerk Kathleen Kreimer said the council will discuss the appointment of one of the people who have expressed interest in the position."It is my understanding that the mayor and council will be voting on the choices they have and making a decision at the meeting," Ms. Kreimer said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
NEW WINDSOR -- Again Wednesday night, the Town Council tabled the question of where to place the water fountain that stood on the corner of Main and High streets for nearly a century.The 12-foot-tall fountain was nearly destroyed about six months ago when a tractor-trailer jumped a curb at the intersection and knocked it down. It has since been repaired and remains in storage, while officials and residents search for a safer site."It will not withstand another accident," said Robert DuVall, the welder who repaired it.At the August meeting, Micki Smith, president of the town's Heritage Committee, gave the results of an informal survey on residents' wishes for its placement.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1994
Union Bridge Mayor Perry L. Jones Jr. last night introduced to the Town Council a $398,500 budget for fiscal 1995 that would increase the town's property tax rate by a penny.The proposed 73-cent tax rate would make up the money Union Bridge must pay Lehigh Portland Cement Co. as the result of two court decisions last year, the mayor said.For years, the Union Bridge company paid property taxes to the town on $4 million worth of land and equipment, chiefly cement storage silos, that turned out to be tax exempt.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2003
It had been about a century since wealthy tourists came by train or by horse and carriage to take the water. The springhouse was partially buried, causing its brick walls to buckle. The bathhouse disappeared. Until about three years ago, the remains of the once-popular New Windsor Sulphur Springs sat abandoned and neglected, its surroundings used for walking dogs or growing tomatoes. Now, however, a committee of historic preservationists is working to unearth - and restore - this piece of Carroll County history.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | October 1, 1993
There are hundreds of reasons why people would want to visit Connie Anders' tiny gray-and-white house. Many of them are cuddly and unbearably cute.As one of the places to be featured on this weekend's New Windsor Homes Tour, Ms. Anders' cottage-style home, filled with her extensive teddy bear collection, is bound to leave visitors with a warm, fuzzy feeling."
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 21, 2007
About two dozen people will congregate next week to render tales about former residents of New Windsor. There's the one about Boiling Mad Anthony Wayne whose tale includes boiling, bones and skin. Another story is about Dr. Roberts Bartholomew, a Civil War doctor who was condemned by the American Medical Association for his unethical medical practices. Then there's the one about Old Tom Brown, who had a glass eye and reportedly drank soda left sitting around by the townspeople. "The stories are not conjured-up tales," said Sharon Schuster, a retired teacher who interviewed local residents and did research to write the stories.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
In flip-flops and a khaki field jacket, Tyler J. Boone kicks back in a chair at the 1887 Taneytown Bank, now converted into the Taneytown History Museum. As curator of the new museum, many call Boone amazing. In a matter of months, he helped to set up the museum in time for the celebration of Taneytown's 250th anniversary last month. He gives walking tours of the town's historic architecture and was art director of the flier for a self-guided tour of the town. He also wrote Images of America: Taneytown, published in May for the Historical Society of Carroll County.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
In flip-flops and a khaki field jacket, Tyler J. Boone kicks back in a chair at the 1887 Taneytown Bank, now converted into the Taneytown History Museum. As curator of the new museum, many call Boone amazing. In a matter of months, he helped to set up the museum in time for the celebration of Taneytown's 250th anniversary last month. He gives walking tours of the town's historic architecture and was art director of the flier for a self-guided tour of the town. He also wrote Images of America: Taneytown, published in May for the Historical Society of Carroll County.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2003
A 19th-century former bank building will provide long-sought quarters for the Taneytown Chamber of Commerce, which plans to open a tourist center and a museum at the downtown site. The building is in move-in condition, and is being vacated this month by a satellite office of the Carroll County Department of Social Services, officials said. The city owns the two-story brick building at 24 E. Baltimore St., across from City Hall. "The chamber wants to start right away," said George W. Naylor, a member and past president of the chamber, who helped look for a place.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2003
It had been about a century since wealthy tourists came by train or by horse and carriage to take the water. The springhouse was partially buried, causing its brick walls to buckle. The bathhouse disappeared. Until about three years ago, the remains of the once-popular New Windsor Sulphur Springs sat abandoned and neglected, its surroundings used for walking dogs or growing tomatoes. Now, however, a committee of historic preservationists is working to unearth - and restore - this piece of Carroll County history.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2000
It's back by popular demand and could be the toughest ticket in town. Crowds overflowed the sole previous performance of "A New Windsor Ballad," a musical play about the small town near Carroll County's western border. Doris Pierce, a member of the New Windsor Heritage Committee, wrote the play for the 1997 bicentennial of its founding. The story begins in 1788 and ends with a cast-and-audience rendition of "On New Windsor" - the song of a school that closed in 1957. "The alumni still sing it at their meetings," Pierce said.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
Taneytown residents overwhelmingly told their City Council last night to forge ahead with revitalization plans for the Main Street area."Go for it," residents called out right before Mayor Henry I. Reindollar Jr. counted the unanimous vote in favor of the project. "The longer we wait, the more expensive it will be," one said.The meeting, called by the council and the Taneytown 2000 committee, was to hear from residents on plans to renovate the town and revitalize its businesses. Members wanted to know if citizens would back a $20,000 feasibility study and the eventual project, which could cost up to $1 million, said City Manager Joseph A. Mangini Jr.State grants, which are quickly diminishing, could pay for half of the feasibility study and some of the revitalization project, Mr. Mangini said.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2004
In flip-flops and a khaki field jacket, Tyler J. Boone kicks back in a chair at the 1887 Taneytown Bank, now converted into the Taneytown History Museum. As curator of the new museum, many call Boone amazing. In a matter of months, he helped to set up the museum in time for the celebration of Taneytown's 250th anniversary last month. He gives walking tours of the town's historic architecture and was art director of the flier for a self-guided tour of the town. He also wrote Images of America: Taneytown, published in May for the Historical Society of Carroll County.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2000
EVERY TOWN SEEMS to have a dwelling, monument or site that becomes the root of that town. For New Windsor, the old springhouse is just that. And, according to Terry Wiley, New Windsor Heritage Committee secretary, the town's development would not have occurred the way it did had it not been for the springhouse and spring. "The story of the springhouse indicates it played a pivotal part in the development of not only the town of New Windsor, but in the development of this entire area of Maryland," the Heritage Committee said in its application for a Save Maryland's Treasures grant.
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