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NEWS
December 3, 2009
We applaud your Nov. 30 editorial, "Credits that work," about the need to extend the Maryland Heritage Structure Rehabilitation Tax Credit program before it expires next year. Gov. Martin O'Malley is committed to authorizing an improved version of the program in the 2010 legislative session. This stimulus has been a proven smart growth tool throughout the state, from Cumberland to Frederick to Montgomery County to Baltimore City to Cambridge. Projects propelled by this program have been catalysts for the revitalization of the communities around them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Jack Dingman recounted an idyllic childhood in Dundalk and looked around the Heritage Fair on Saturday wishing for the blue-collar community to return to the glory that had been bolstered by a booming steel plant. The 28-year-old contractor, who now lives in Middle River, grew up less than a mile from the fairgrounds, and said he used to walk to the festival past thriving stores, restaurants and barbershops. "I love Dundalk, and I am proud to be from Dundalk," Dingman said. "But it breaks my heart.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
A fledgling museum dedicated to preserving Polish and Slavic heritage and culture was dedicated in Baltimore on Sunday. The National Slavic Museum at 1735 Fleet St. in Fells Point is staffed by volunteers. The small museum's collection includes items from several Slavic countries, many with religious themes - paintings of Jesus Christ, Bibles, crucifixes and a cabinet for holding holy water. "We have a lot more to collect. We just started," said the Rev. Ivan Dornic, a priest who helped found the museum.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
When Severn resident Joan M.E. Gaither was born nearly 70 years ago, the word "negro" was printed on her birth certificate. Gaither, an artist and retired educator, says she has channeled the hurt and humiliation she has endured from racism over the years into something positive - namely, her narrative quilt pieces, in which she aims to show the legacies and contributions of African-Americans and denounce the idea of racial segregation. "When I should die, I don't even care if my name is on my grave," she said.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
I was a bit confused by the letter Jeff Nelson wrote regarding the need for a White Student Union at Towson University. For the record, "white" is how most people would describe me. That's no more a part of my heritage than the fact that my eyes are blue. Now I claim no particular expertise in racial matters, but it seems to me that being black comes with a heritage, much more so than being white. White people in the U.S. were spared slavery, Jim Crow, segregation and having to struggle for equal rights.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
I read with dismay your story about Baltimore County's plan to close Essex SkyPark ("Members fear Balto. Co. will shut Essex Skypark," Jan. 5). The narrative focused on old men flying old airplanes out of an old airport in Essex. But if the airport were in north central Baltimore County and the pilots and aircraft owners were politicians, developers and attorneys, the story line no doubt would have celebrated a historic landing field in beautiful pastoral Baltimore County, with a fleet of carefully restored antique aircraft flown by a cadre of experienced and dedicated aviators.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
Baltimore is one of the oldest cities in the United States, with a wealth of history and historical landmarks. It's amazing how the City Council thinks it owns those historic landmarks ("Ownership isn't the issue," April 4). How presumptuous of them to sell or lease the city's heritage to fill its coffers. A new low has been achieved in this city's politics with this idea. They seem to forget the people own the landmarks, not the City Council, not MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake, Not the governor but the people.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
Tickets are now available for the Catonsville Historical Society's 16th Heritage Homes Tour to be held on May 4, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Owners of eight local residences will showcase a variety of interesting architectures, modernizations, decors and furnishings, as well as springtime gardens and landscape treatments at the 19th and 20th century homes on the tour. Tickets for the tour will be informational brochures and cost $25. Send check payable to the Catonsville Historical Society to: Catonsville Historical Society, c/o The Wilderness B&B, 2 Thistle Road, Catonsville, Md. 21228.
NEWS
By Burt Kummerow | February 8, 2012
A sad tale has been unfolding here in Baltimore. From the library of the Maryland Historical Society to the Baltimore City Jail and a federal courtroom, two arrested and accused thieves, guilty by their own admission, are being ushered through the justice system. The story now bouncing around the media has lessons and cautions for all of us. Barry A. Landau pleaded guilty Tuesday to stealing thousands of important historical documents from East Coast libraries and historical societies.
NEWS
October 11, 1994
These are rough times for Baltimore and most other aging cities. Not only is the lure of residential suburbs continuing but "edge cities" like Owings Mills, White Marsh and Columbia are increasingly competing for offices and businesses.Which is why we invite readers to take another look at a little-known in-town neighborhood called Madison Park. Bounded by North Avenue, Laurens, Morris and Tiffany streets, it is a melange of architectural styles from Second Empire and Queen Anne to Romanesque Revival.
NEWS
By John F. Gossart Jr and By John F. Gossart Jr | March 12, 2014
It remains to be seen whether the United States Congress can muster the responsibility and will to do what is right and achieve comprehensive immigration reform this year. Republican leadership in the House of Representatives continues to hold immigration reform hostage, most recently justifying inaction by blaming President Obama's alleged track record on failing to enforce our immigration laws. Perhaps those in Congress should come and sit inside the many immigration courtrooms throughout the country for a fact check on this unfounded assertion.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Date: Dec. 6 and 7 Her story: Zaineb Makhzoumi, 33, grew up in Lutherville. She is a dermatologist, Mohs surgeon and assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Her parents, Hassan and Rayya Makhzoumi, emigrated from Beirut in 1978. They moved back to Beirut in 2008, though Rayya returns to their Lutherville home several times a year. His story: Ayman Tomhe, 34, also grew up in Lutherville. He was a 7-Eleven franchisee for 10 years before opening a State Farm office in Baltimore last month.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
As a 5-year-old sitting on his great-grandmother's knee in the 1950s in Philadelphia, Marc Young listened patiently as she whispered in broken English the same two sentences she would come to repeat in a weekly ritual for years. "God gave the Ten Commandments to Moses on Mount Sinai. Ever since, the Jews are a special people to God," Grandma Rose would tell him in her thick Ukrainian accent while gently rubbing his forearm with hands gnarled by years of menial labor. "She wasn't so much stroking my arm as she was trying to grind her message into my chromosomes," recalled Young, a longtime Columbia resident who is now 62. The outcome of her wish - that her great-grandson take her place in passing along stories of Jewish history, culture and folklore - will be on display when he takes part in "Tales of Nature: An Afternoon of Professional Storytelling.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 15, 2013
Most Saturday mornings find me inspecting progress as an 1873 cotton duck textile factory makes its $45 million transformation into 84 apartments, offices and two restaurants. Known as Mill No. 1, at 3000 Falls Road, the complex seems to sit astride an invisible line between Hampden and Remington. It's taken nearly two years for this exceptional Jones Falls Valley industrial landmark to take its bows. The first wave of tenants moved in earlier this year; Evergreen Health is the first large commercial tenant.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Revered as a "gentleman in the finest sense of the word, remarkable convert-maker and a friend of the benighted," the Rev. Vincent Warren drove into rural Virginia one September night to share the word of God. He had no idea of what awaited. A caravan of cars overtook his own. Hooded men in white robes forced him into one of their cars and drove off. They interrogated the cleric at gunpoint - "What are you doing in the area? Are you going to start a church?" - before releasing him hours later.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
The tale of a tiny river village that was nearly wiped out in 1972 after the shuttering of its textile mill - and that had its existence further threatened months later by Tropical Storm Agnes - is a compelling one. The rebirth of Oella, which has an Ellicott City ZIP code despite being located on the Baltimore County side of the Patapsco River, will be the subject of a talk by Charles Wagandt on Tuesday at the Miller branch library. Wagandt, a grandson of mill owner William J. Dickey, is a developer who purchased 76 acres in Oella in 1973, promising to revitalize a town ravaged by fire, floods and financial woes.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | August 2, 1997
SOME HUNDRED persons from local history institutions gathered Wednesday at the University of Baltimore for a rough and ready symposium provoked by the collapse of City Life Museums a year after its ambitious expansion.They represented some 25 historical institutions as well as others with historical dimensions, tourism, preservation, government and foundations.They were charged by one of the conveners, Robert J. Brugger, the leading historian of Maryland, to solve three questions:1. What is the right way to save City Life Museums?
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | August 13, 1991
Heritage Automotive Group is engaged in talks to purchase some or all of the Baltimore-area dealerships operated as Larry's Chevrolet, Larry's Dodge, Larry's Mazda and Larry's GMC Truck Pontiac.Officials for the two companies would not speak publicly about the negotiations, but a source familiar with the talks, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said Heritage has made a formal offer and a tentative settlement is scheduled for Aug. 23.The source said the deal could easily be delayed, changed or canceled before settlement.
NEWS
October 24, 2013
There was no "misperception" about Patapsco Heritage Greenway. The Friends of Patapsco Valley and Heritage Greenway organization tried to create a Maryland Heritage Tourism Area by that name back in the 1990s. As I understand it, by 2000, numerous local environmental and community groups opposed the certification, Howard and Baltimore County withdrew support and the Sierra Club brought a lawsuit against it. After settling the lawsuit out of court, the Friends spent 13 years clearing trash and garlic mustard out of Patapsco Valley State Park.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
There's a reason people want to own or visit properties that back up to open spaces: Nature enhances lives. And that's why protecting and preserving the Patapsco Valley "is really all about quality of life," says John Slater, president of Patapsco Heritage Greenway, a 13-year-old organization dedicated to ensuring the valley's future. With an eye toward moving that mission forward, the group will host a public forum at 7 p.m. Monday. The event, "Envision the Valley," will be held at St. Augustine School in Elkridge and is a repeat of presentation of a consultant's final report given this week in Catonsville.
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