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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 14, 2008
Kyra Sedgwick has her own personal take on the appeal of her hit cable series, The Closer, and it goes dead against the conventional wisdom of character growth as the key to great drama. Sedgwick believes LAPD Deputy Police Chief Brenda Leigh Johnson is such a fan favorite in large part because she shows no real growth, emotional or otherwise - ever. "You know, it's funny, but that's sort of the thing about her, she's really not that changed since the start of the series," says Sedgwick, who also serves as co-executive producer.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
One of the biggest events of the TV year and one of the finest new series of the summer arrive on the small screen the next two weeks. In the past, both productions would have been on PBS. Instead, they are on Internet television - Netflix and the Maryland-based Acorn subscription service. Together, they offer a snapshot of both the way technology is radically changing the manner in which we watch TV and the extent to which a downsized PBS is melting away to nothingness except fundraisers, Ken Burns and “Downton Abbey.” On Wednesday, Netflix will release all six episodes of Season 1 of “Happy Valley,” a taut and hard-edged BBC drama set in West Yorkshire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
One of the biggest events of the TV year and one of the finest new series of the summer arrive on the small screen the next two weeks. In the past, both productions would have been on PBS. Instead, they are on Internet television - Netflix and the Maryland-based Acorn subscription service. Together, they offer a snapshot of both the way technology is radically changing the manner in which we watch TV and the extent to which a downsized PBS is melting away to nothingness except fundraisers, Ken Burns and “Downton Abbey.” On Wednesday, Netflix will release all six episodes of Season 1 of “Happy Valley,” a taut and hard-edged BBC drama set in West Yorkshire.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 14, 2008
Kyra Sedgwick has her own personal take on the appeal of her hit cable series, The Closer, and it goes dead against the conventional wisdom of character growth as the key to great drama. Sedgwick believes LAPD Deputy Police Chief Brenda Leigh Johnson is such a fan favorite in large part because she shows no real growth, emotional or otherwise - ever. "You know, it's funny, but that's sort of the thing about her, she's really not that changed since the start of the series," says Sedgwick, who also serves as co-executive producer.
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May 10, 1998
Agatha Christie(1890-1976)Had a conventional late Victorian upbringing and was educated at home by her mother until the age of 16. As an adult she began writing fiction and used many of her own experiences and adventures as the background to novels, such as "Death on the Nile."She is best known for having created super sleuths Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. Novels inspired by the two have been made into numerous films and television plays. Although Christie dubbed herself 'the Dutchess of Death," her work exhibits realistic rather than Gothic features: plot construction and moral values are more important to her than sensational effects.
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By Deepti Hajela and Deepti Hajela,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 18, 1998
"Black Coffee," by Agatha Christie. St. Martin's. 240 pages. $22.95.Charles Osborne gets points for trying. His novelization of Agatha Christie's play "Black Coffee" has some of the earmarks: Belgian detective Hercule Poirot and his passion for precision; and the ever-obtuse Captain Hastings.But the result, "Black Coffee" (St. Martin's, 240 pages, $22.95), .. shows that it wasn't just those traits that made Christie's novels so wonderful. Osborne's work just doesn't have the same feel.The story isn't fulfilling.
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By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
For a different sort of summer reading list, we asked readers for favorite books that capture the feel of sand and sea. Our own favorites include Dune by Frank Herbert, In a Sunburned Country by Bill Bryson and Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Satchel, Larry Tye's new biography of Negro League legend Leroy "Satchel" Paige, also promises the gritty feel of a hot, dusty infield. Here are more reader choices to transport you: * Before the Wind, edited by David Gowdey. This compilation of 25 true sailing stories covers everything from Joshua Slocum setting out to sail around the world to Ted Turner on racing strategy.
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 2001
Bowie Community Theatre opens its season with a pleasant bit of escapism in Agatha Christie's Black Coffee, a mystery guaranteed to keep an audience wide-awake. Action in the thriller, which runs through Oct. 20, takes place in the drawing room of an upper-class English family. Black Coffee, written in 1930, was Christie's first play. She created characters such as wealthy scientist and despotic patriarch Sir Claud Amory (Mike Dunlop); his son, Richard Amory, who is forced to live frugally; and Richard's sensitive and stressed Italian wife, Lucia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and By Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | April 25, 1999
"Agatha Christie and the Eleven Missing Days," by Jared Cade. Dufour Editions. 258 pages. $39.95.For one of the most influential mystery writers of all time, Agatha Christie came off as something of a rank amateur when she authored her own 11-day disappearance in 1926. She talked too much, she gave conflicting explanations. Even then, the press was scornful of the official explanation -- amnesia -- and cynical enough to suggest it was all a publicity stunt for the writer who had just published her sixth novel, "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
Lies are a lousy thing on which to base a relationship, much less a life.That's why the characters of Jonathan Nossiter's "Sunday," the FTC grand-jury-prize winner at the 1997 Sundance Festival, are doomed from the start.It's also why the film they inhabit is so compellingly labyrinthine, so endlessly intriguing and so ultimately frustrating. Labyrinthine, because the lies and fabrications are piled on so thickly that you won't know who -- or what -- to believe. Intriguing because that uncertainty demands that you pay attention.
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By E.R. Shipp | May 13, 1998
THERE is something absolutely annoying about the way some culture gurus take for granted that, come tomorrow night, we will all sit glued to our televisions watching the last episode of "Seinfeld."To do otherwise is to be uncivilized, un-American, someone unworthy of calling herself a New Yorker.Well, excuse me. I have been a New Yorker for 22 years. But I am not a "Seinfeld" fan. And, from what I have gathered from various folks I've talked to in recent days, I am not alone.I am not one of those snobs who insist that they never watch television.
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By LYNN WILLIAMS A YOUNG PAINTER: THE LIFE AND PAINTINGS OF WANG YANI. and LYNN WILLIAMS A YOUNG PAINTER: THE LIFE AND PAINTINGS OF WANG YANI.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 12, 1992
MONSIEUR PAMPLEMOUSSE RESTS HIS CASE.Michael Bond.Fawcett Columbine.199 pages. $17.If you got Georges Feydeau thoroughly snockered on champagne and foie gras at Maxim's, then directed him to write a whodunit, the results would approximate the adventures of Aristide Pamplemousse and his sidekick Pommes Frites, a bloodhound with an educated palate.Although he is the creation of an Englishman -- Michael Bond's most popular series character is one Paddington Bear -- the thoroughly French M. Pamplemousse is in the tradition of the great farceurs.
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