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By Patti Restivo | April 28, 2014
Nature couldn't have been more gracious Saturday as she beckoned visitors of all ages to the 18th annual Montpelier Festival of Herbs, Tea and the Arts at Montpelier Mansion in South Laurel. "We got very, very lucky with the weather," said Montpelier museum educator Holly Burnham, who organized the festival. Spread across the mansion's lawn under a near-perfect spring sky, more than 40 vendors and craftors offered bath products, fabric art, home and garden products, jewelry, plants and herbs, food and tea for sale.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
By the middle of the fourth quarter of Morgan State's 28-3 win over Bowie State at Hughes Stadium on Saturday, running back Herb Walker Jr. had gained 118 yards, marking the third straight game in which the team had a 100-yard rusher. But with 3:27 left, the redshirt sophomore was stripped of the football by Bulldogs junior linebacker Robert Burke, and redshirt junior outside linebacker Jonathan Harris pounced on the loose ball at the Bears' 41-yard line. Normally, that might have been the end of the day for Walker as he had nothing left to prove and there seemed to be no point in putting him back in at risk of injury with Morgan State holding a 14-3 advantage.
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FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol | January 20, 1998
Herbs are labeled "dietary supplements" in the United States, where manufacturers are barred from making health claims because herbs have not been subjected to the rigorous clinical trials required for drugs. Research on herbs is plentiful in Europe and Asia, but quality varies, making claims hard to substantiate.The Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health has begun compiling a list of claims and U.S. research in anticipation of more testing in the United States.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As one of the shortest players on the Morgan State football team, Herb Walker Jr. has a nickname among his Bears teammates: "Smurf. " The running back, who recently confessed to being 1 inch shorter than his already diminutive listed height of 5 feet 8, has heard worse from defenses. The insults don't bother him as much as the assumptions behind them. Opponents tell Walker he's "soft. Or I don't run hard," he said. "But they'll feel me when I get the ball. " Neither label fit after the 19-year-old Walker set a school record a week ago. In Morgan State's 26-23 loss Saturday to Holy Cross, 26-23, the sophomore rushed for 271 yards and two touchdowns on 29 carries.
FEATURES
May 7, 1995
The Landis Valley Museum in Lancaster, Pa., will hold its eighth annual Herb Faire, the largest sale of antique plants in the state, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday.More than 35 vendors will offer herbs and garden-related products, including everything from ornamental flowers to heirloom tomatoes, as well as a large selection of historical roses. Books, food and beverages will also be sold. The sale benefits the Heirloom Seed Project. Admission is free. The museum is on Route 272, north of Lancaster.
FEATURES
By Isabel Forgang and Isabel Forgang,New York Daily News | July 4, 1992
Drink mint tea and you may slow the aging process, says botanist James Duke. Add some basil to a bean dish to minimize intestinal gas, advises nutrition writer Jean Carper.Scientists are proving in the lab what grandmother knew all along: Herbs are potent medicine. And that's good news for summertime gardeners who often end up with an abundance of basil, parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme.You're doing yourself a favor when you add fresh herbs to food, insists Ms. Carper, whose latest book, "The Food Pharmacy Guide to Good Eating" (Bantam.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2000
IF YOU want to learn about herbs and spend a relaxing day with friends, attend a seminar sponsored by the Friendly Thyme Herb Club from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 23 at St. John Lutheran Church, 300 W. Maple Road. Sue Latini, symposium chairwoman, said the theme for the day is "Old-Fashioned Herbs in a New Millennium." Three herbal activities are scheduled: learning to make herbal bath scrubs, presented by member Adele Walter; learning to make herb vinegars, presented by member Cindy Swiss; and creating a four-square garden, presented by member Sally Waltz.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
Members of the Friendly Thyme Herb Club got into the spirit of Halloween a bit early Friday as they turned themselves into good and bad witches to discuss the herbs witches used in their magic potions.Richard Hood, the club's president and the lone warlock, said he got the idea for the program from an article he read 12 years ago in The Herb Quarterly.In the article, a New Hampshire woman and her son turned 530 acres known as Rock Pool Estate into a showcase for herbs vTC found in supposed witches' gardens.
FEATURES
By Carol Cutler and Carol Cutler,Copley News Service | September 4, 1991
Let's hear a big hurrah for herbs. This is the time of the year when lucky home gardeners are still picking from luxuriant bushes. Even apartment dwellers with pots on the windowsill are snipping away at the aromatic greens and adding an extra snap to their cooking.Herbs are at their flavorful peak when fresh. All the culinary impact of herbs is stored in the oils that are released when crushed or cooked. There are a few exceptions, like bay leaves and oregano, that get stronger when dried.
FEATURES
By Paulette Ladach and Paulette Ladach,Dallas Morning News | July 15, 1992
Many of us know when food tastes good, but we can't isolate which herb or spice -- or combination -- produces the flavors we want.Thus, some cooks choose seasonings out of habit, rather than from a real knowledge of how herbs and spices work together. If it's Mexican, grab the chili powder; Italian, reach for the oregano.Knowing how spices taste can help you figure out what's right or wrong with a dish. And the only way to learn how things taste is to sample them.You won't learn by reading.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
With its four terraces of thriving plants sloping down toward a babbling lily pond, Jim Duke's garden could certainly be considered a healing place. And that's precisely what the world-renowned botanist and author's Green Farmacy Garden is. Featuring 80 plots that showcase 300 plants for whatever ails you — from addictions to yeast infections and everything in between — the garden is a living catalog of herbal medicine. From 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, the Howard County Conservancy will sponsor a lecture and guided tour of the garden at the Fulton home Jim Duke shares with his wife, Peggy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun and By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Each spring, potted herbs and vegetables dot the fire escape of Steve Kelly's home in Mount Vernon. He grows anywhere from six to nine types of peppers, ranging from red and yellow to cayenne and banana. His herbs include basil, tarragon, chives, rosemary and thyme. And then there's the mint. Kelly grows three kinds: orange mint, spearmint and peppermint. He uses them in tea, water and the occasional "adult beverage," he said. "I throw [herbs] in almost everything I make," Kelly said.
NEWS
Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Summertime is salad season. At Fox & Fern Cafe in Forest Hill, chef Michael White mixes fresh greens with crisp bacon and sharp cheddar to make a hearty salad inspired by traditional California ingredients like sprouts and avocado. He tosses the salad with an herbaceous green goddess dressing that gets a  savory boost from blended anchovies. The crunchy vegetables and cool, creamy dressing are a perfect fit for al fresco dinners on warm summer evenings.   California Salad Yield: Four appetizers or two dinner salads, two cups of dressing   For the dressing: 3 anchovy fillets 1 teaspoon minced garlic ¾ cup mayonnaise ¾ cup plain yogurt ½ cup fresh parsley (packed)
HEALTH
By Rebecca Smith, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from dietetic intern Rebecca Smith. Everyone needs an excuse to get outside this time of year, and what better way to enjoy the outdoors than to play in the dirt a little and produce your own food? Seeing the connection between the garden and your dinner table is fun, but it doesn't mean you have to spend hours toiling in the sun pulling weeds. A first garden can be a couple of potted herbs on a porch.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | May 6, 2014
Josiah Taft of Edgewood is the first-place winner in a national patriotic essay contest sponsored by the National Society of Colonial Wars Inc. Josiah, the son of Brad and MaryAnn Taft, is 13 years old and in eighth grade. He has been home-schooled for eight years. The society annually sponsors an essay competition open to seventh- and eighth-graders. Essays are 250 to 500 words and are judged on subject matter, interest, spelling and punctuation. Each year a new topic is announced; this year's was Colonial Medicine.
NEWS
By Patti Restivo | April 28, 2014
Nature couldn't have been more gracious Saturday as she beckoned visitors of all ages to the 18th annual Montpelier Festival of Herbs, Tea and the Arts at Montpelier Mansion in South Laurel. "We got very, very lucky with the weather," said Montpelier museum educator Holly Burnham, who organized the festival. Spread across the mansion's lawn under a near-perfect spring sky, more than 40 vendors and craftors offered bath products, fabric art, home and garden products, jewelry, plants and herbs, food and tea for sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun and By Allison Eatough, For The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Each spring, potted herbs and vegetables dot the fire escape of Steve Kelly's home in Mount Vernon. He grows anywhere from six to nine types of peppers, ranging from red and yellow to cayenne and banana. His herbs include basil, tarragon, chives, rosemary and thyme. And then there's the mint. Kelly grows three kinds: orange mint, spearmint and peppermint. He uses them in tea, water and the occasional "adult beverage," he said. "I throw [herbs] in almost everything I make," Kelly said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | June 24, 1999
WoodenBoat ShowMore than 100 wooden boats -- from 80-foot yachts to a 15-foot working skiff -- are on display in the water and on land this weekend when the WoodenBoat Show returns to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels. Sponsored by WoodenBoat Magazine of Brooklin, Maine, this year's show focuses on boats from the Chesapeake Bay region. The skipjack H.M. Krentz, the schooner Imagine, and the museum's buyboat Mister Jim offer short Bay excursions, and suppliers to the wooden-boat market exhibit paint, varnish, tools, hardware, sails, oars, boat building kits and plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Herb & Soul began last September as a catering and carryout operation in the back part of a Parkville convenience store. The offerings included interesting Southern cuisine and soul food but also typical carryout items like cheese steaks and wings. The owners - Brandon Taylor, Yuriy Chernov and David Thomas, the executive chef - were encouraged enough by the neighborhood's response to think about expanding or even moving. They at one point considered a property in the Hollins Market neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2013
On Sunday, Thomas Albright will wake up early. Before 5 a.m., the patriarch of the Albright Farms family will be in his truck, driving from his farm in Monkton to the city, where Saratoga and Holliday streets meet underneath the Jones Falls Expressway. By 7 a.m., he'll see his first customers — friendly faces coming to buy Albright Farms' produce or meat, kicking off another season of the Baltimore Farmers' Market & Bazaar. Albright has participated in the market since 1979, just two years after it opened.
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