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NEWS
November 21, 2004
On November 17, 2004, STEPHEN "HERBIE" BERTSCH, age 55, of Towson, MD., beloved husband of Cynthia Bertsch (nee Blevins), son of Herbert C. and the late Jean Bertsch, step-son of Helen Bertsch, brother of Jeanne Gay, Jay A. Bertsch, Sharon Aponte and Bridget Reynard. Also survived by five nephews, one niece and one great-nephew Memorial Services will be held at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Glyndon, MD., Wednesday, November 24, 2004 at 7 P., M. in the small chapel. In lieu of flowers please send donations to VA Hospice, 3900 Loch Raven Blvd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Renee Enna | June 18, 2008
Fresh herb season is under way in gardens and pots throughout the area. So how about using them in a fast, easy and nutritious omelet? We're naming it Herbie and it's enough to feed two. And because it's quick to make, Herbie the Second won't add much time to making supper for four. Kids will like Herbie, too, especially if you use olive slices to fashion a face on the omelet. Sauvignon blanc will pair well with the herbs in the dish. For kids, a glass of milk is a fine partner. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
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NEWS
By Renee Enna | June 18, 2008
Fresh herb season is under way in gardens and pots throughout the area. So how about using them in a fast, easy and nutritious omelet? We're naming it Herbie and it's enough to feed two. And because it's quick to make, Herbie the Second won't add much time to making supper for four. Kids will like Herbie, too, especially if you use olive slices to fashion a face on the omelet. Sauvignon blanc will pair well with the herbs in the dish. For kids, a glass of milk is a fine partner. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
August 30, 2006
Maritime concerts -- The Annapolis Maritime Museum will continue its free summer concert series from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. today at Cap'n Herbie Sadler Park, 133 Bay Shore Ave., and from noon to 1 p.m. tomorrow at Annapolis City Dock. Them Eastport Oyster Boys (above) will perform. Attendees are encouraged to take blankets or lawn chairs. Beverages will be sold. www.annapolismaritime museum.org or 410-295-0104.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 22, 2005
Talk about classic movie images and a few quickly come to mind: sparks flying from the ruby slippers in The Wizard of Oz, E.T. pointing at Elliott's heart, the snow globe shattering at the beginning of Citizen Kane. Then, of course, there's the VW Beetle winning an auto race in 1969's The Love Bug. Anyone who isn't charmed by the idea of a Beetle crossing the finish line first is either chronically churlish or isn't trying. Movie audiences, especially kids, have always been with the program, making a hit of The Love Bug as well as its four theatrical sequels (the last of which was 1980's Herbie Goes Bananas)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2005
NOW OR NEVER The original Herbie from the 1966 movie, an early directing effort by George Lucas, is making a tour across America along with up to 50 vintage cars in the Herbie & Friends Cruise Across America. The tour started in Santa Monica, Calif., on May 15 and will end in San Diego on June 11. In the meantime, Herbie & Friends will make an appearance at the Inner Harbor on Saturday morning. There will be miniature Herbies, races and games. Visitors can race remote-control cars and play the new Herbie: Fully Loaded game for Game Boy before it is released.
NEWS
August 30, 2006
Maritime concerts -- The Annapolis Maritime Museum will continue its free summer concert series from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. today at Cap'n Herbie Sadler Park, 133 Bay Shore Ave., and from noon to 1 p.m. tomorrow at Annapolis City Dock. Them Eastport Oyster Boys (above) will perform. Attendees are encouraged to take blankets or lawn chairs. Beverages will be sold. www.annapolismaritime museum.org or 410-295-0104.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 2001
It's a good bet that "Gypsy" will always be playing somewhere. One of Broadway's most distinguished shows, it gave theater legend Ethel Merman her greatest role as Mama Rose with its opening in 1959, and has been brought back in revivals there and in film. The latest local production opens Saturday at the Chesapeake Music Hall dinner theater for a seven-week run. Owner, choreographer and Jill-of-all-trades Sherry Kay Anderson will be heading the cast in Merman's famous role. Based on the autobiography of burlesque stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, the Jule Styne-Stephen Sondheim musical centers on quintessential stage mother Rose Novick, who "has a dream" that younger daughter June can break into show business.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2001
CAP'N HERBIE Sadler and his wife, Gladys, were for many years a center of Eastport life. Before he died in 1975, he was considered by many to be the "grandfather" of the community. Their business and their home bustled from sunup to sundown. As neighborhood children, Ben Sarles, Pip Moyer and Bob Mahoney, to name just a few, learned the ways of the water from the Sadlers. Nearly two generations of residents and visitors lined up to buy the finest crabs, oysters, and fish from Herbie's Crab Shack on Second Street, and for nearly 30 years beginning in 1947 from Sadler's Seafood Market and Marine Railway (now the location of O'Leary's Restaurant and the Chesapeake Catamaran Center)
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 6, 1993
Doc "Riverboat" Schaefer, the gambling guv, is doing his best for all the citizens, including my cousin Herbie.Every Thursday, Herbie takes the bus to Atlantic City, where he promptly loses the grocery money. Soon, he won't have to anymore. Instead, Herbie can lose the grocery money in an actual hometown grocery store.And he can thank the guv for this kindness. The guv knew of Herbie's plight. He knows buses cost money -- gambling money.So, he sprang into action.Faster than you can say three-card monte, the guv and his pals in the legislature (they're the ones wearing the green eyeshades, saying, "Pal, you gonna hit 16 or not?"
NEWS
April 16, 2006
HERBIE HANCOCK: POSSIBILITIES / / Magnolia Home Entertainment / / $26.98 Throughout his career, spanning more than 40 years, Herbie Hancock has always resisted being pegged as one type of artist. At his core, he's a jazz man, composer of such standards as 1962's "Watermelon Man" and 1965's "Maiden Voyage." But like his former boss, Miles Davis, the Chi-Town native is a restless musical spirit whose scope includes bold, shifting elements of various genres. Classical, pop, bop, hip-hop, funk, R&B, the blues, folk, samba -- all have been explored and dismantled at different times in Hancock's music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | September 1, 2005
Herbie Hancock, forever the chameleonic musician, is still restless. And that's a good thing. As he talks about the art of making music and his just-released album, Possibilities, he's as analytical as a professor -- breaking down some of his ideas literally note for note. A palpable enthusiasm bubbles through all the talk of chord changes and melody and rhythm embellishments. Calling from his Los Angeles office, Hancock puts me on hold from time to time to give instructions to his assistant.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 22, 2005
Talk about classic movie images and a few quickly come to mind: sparks flying from the ruby slippers in The Wizard of Oz, E.T. pointing at Elliott's heart, the snow globe shattering at the beginning of Citizen Kane. Then, of course, there's the VW Beetle winning an auto race in 1969's The Love Bug. Anyone who isn't charmed by the idea of a Beetle crossing the finish line first is either chronically churlish or isn't trying. Movie audiences, especially kids, have always been with the program, making a hit of The Love Bug as well as its four theatrical sequels (the last of which was 1980's Herbie Goes Bananas)
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2005
There are still good reasons to thank a higher authority for Friday - it's the end of the workweek, the start of the weekend and, often, payday - but one of them is slipping away. Friday is losing ground as the day when new movies arrive at the multiplex. Opening day for some major films moved to Thursday years ago and now has landed on Wednesday. Batman Begins opened last Wednesday. War of the Worlds opens next Wednesday. And Herbie: Fully Loaded makes its debut today. "I think Wednesday, in some cases, is the new Friday," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations, which tracks box office revenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2005
NOW OR NEVER The original Herbie from the 1966 movie, an early directing effort by George Lucas, is making a tour across America along with up to 50 vintage cars in the Herbie & Friends Cruise Across America. The tour started in Santa Monica, Calif., on May 15 and will end in San Diego on June 11. In the meantime, Herbie & Friends will make an appearance at the Inner Harbor on Saturday morning. There will be miniature Herbies, races and games. Visitors can race remote-control cars and play the new Herbie: Fully Loaded game for Game Boy before it is released.
NEWS
November 21, 2004
On November 17, 2004, STEPHEN "HERBIE" BERTSCH, age 55, of Towson, MD., beloved husband of Cynthia Bertsch (nee Blevins), son of Herbert C. and the late Jean Bertsch, step-son of Helen Bertsch, brother of Jeanne Gay, Jay A. Bertsch, Sharon Aponte and Bridget Reynard. Also survived by five nephews, one niece and one great-nephew Memorial Services will be held at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Glyndon, MD., Wednesday, November 24, 2004 at 7 P., M. in the small chapel. In lieu of flowers please send donations to VA Hospice, 3900 Loch Raven Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 1, 1994
There are many types of poverty.The mother in Donald Margulies' "The Loman Family Picnic" insists, "We are middle-middle class, smack in the middle," but the family is financially strapped. The husband and bread-winner, however, suffers from a more deep-seated poverty a poverty of the spirit that threatens to engulf his wife and two sons.To counteract this, the younger son nourishes his spirit with a rich fantasy life. That wild and often comic sense of fantasy, blended with pathos, is what makes Margulies' moving play so theatrical, entertaining and challenging.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2005
There are still good reasons to thank a higher authority for Friday - it's the end of the workweek, the start of the weekend and, often, payday - but one of them is slipping away. Friday is losing ground as the day when new movies arrive at the multiplex. Opening day for some major films moved to Thursday years ago and now has landed on Wednesday. Batman Begins opened last Wednesday. War of the Worlds opens next Wednesday. And Herbie: Fully Loaded makes its debut today. "I think Wednesday, in some cases, is the new Friday," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations, which tracks box office revenue.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2001
CAP'N HERBIE Sadler and his wife, Gladys, were for many years a center of Eastport life. Before he died in 1975, he was considered by many to be the "grandfather" of the community. Their business and their home bustled from sunup to sundown. As neighborhood children, Ben Sarles, Pip Moyer and Bob Mahoney, to name just a few, learned the ways of the water from the Sadlers. Nearly two generations of residents and visitors lined up to buy the finest crabs, oysters, and fish from Herbie's Crab Shack on Second Street, and for nearly 30 years beginning in 1947 from Sadler's Seafood Market and Marine Railway (now the location of O'Leary's Restaurant and the Chesapeake Catamaran Center)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 2001
It's a good bet that "Gypsy" will always be playing somewhere. One of Broadway's most distinguished shows, it gave theater legend Ethel Merman her greatest role as Mama Rose with its opening in 1959, and has been brought back in revivals there and in film. The latest local production opens Saturday at the Chesapeake Music Hall dinner theater for a seven-week run. Owner, choreographer and Jill-of-all-trades Sherry Kay Anderson will be heading the cast in Merman's famous role. Based on the autobiography of burlesque stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, the Jule Styne-Stephen Sondheim musical centers on quintessential stage mother Rose Novick, who "has a dream" that younger daughter June can break into show business.
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