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By Donna Boller and Donna Boller,Staff writer | March 22, 1992
Waverly Elementary School grounds will go herbicide-free this springto test whether teachers and students can find an alternative for killing weeds and grass where mowers cannot reach.The school is thesecond in Howard County to request a halt to herbicide sprays. The Thunder Hill Elementary School PTA is working with the school system'sgrounds staff on plans to maintain the grounds without herbicides this spring and during the 1992-1993 school year.Grounds workers routinely spray areas outside the reach of mowerseach spring and summer.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
All of the leaves on some of my tomato plants have curled down, except a few twisted in all directions. They were growing great for a while. It looks contagious because they're all together. What is this? Tomato plants are like canaries in the coal mine when it comes to herbicide injury. They are super sensitive to the chemical 2,4-D and its family of growth-regulating herbicides, including clopyralid. Twisted growth is a classic symptom. Most likely an herbicide sprayed in your area was carried by wind and drifted onto the tomato plants.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | March 11, 1992
Nancy Lefenfeld was picking up her two children at Thunder Hill Elementary School last spring when she saw students running across schoolgrounds that had been posted with yellow "Caution! Pesticide Application" signs.As a result, the PTA Council of Howard County will ask the school board tomorrow to investigate alternatives to herbicidesnow used to kill grass and weeds on school grounds areas that mowerscannot reach. The board is scheduled to meet at 4 p.m. at the Department of Education, 10910 Route 108.And the PTA at Thunder Hill Elementary School, responding to Lefenfeld's concerns, is asking school officials not to spray school grounds for the rest of this year and the 1992-1993 school year.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
The sprawling farm along Annapolis Road in Gambrills stands as an oasis of rural life in the midst of suburbia. Cows graze beyond the white fence as commuters pass by; farm trucks carry organic produce to local farmers markets. Maryland Sunrise Farm is on 857 acres that served as a dairy operation for the U.S. Naval Academy as recently as the 1990s; midshipmen got their milk straight from the source. Its corn maze is a fall tradition, and residents say the farm is a reminder of Anne Arundel's agricultural past, a marker of history in a fast-growing portion of the county not far from Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Luther Young | April 24, 1991
Scientists have found small amounts of potentially cancer-causing herbicides in rainwater from 23 Midwestern and Northeastern states, including Maryland.Based on nine months of results through October 1990, a U.S. Geological Survey study confirms earlier research that the toxic chemicals can evaporate into the atmosphere and return to Earth as precipitation hundreds of miles away, much like acid rain."The concentrations are very small. I don't think there's any cause for concern for human and animal health," said Donald Goolsby, a USGS water quality specialist.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1997
WASHINGTON - Some public beaches along the Potomac River in Maryland and Virginia are likely to be overrun with aquatic weeds, said Stuart Freudberg, director of environmental programs for the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.And boaters could be aggravated this summer by strings of hydrilla winding around their propellers, he warned.Federal funds used to mow hydrilla were cut by President Clinton from the budget that went into effect Oct. 1.One of the worst consequences could be that property owners "would probably take matters into their own hands," Freudberg told the COG board.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
State Natural Resources Secretary J. Charles Fox sealed the fate yesterday of the reportedly hundreds of snakeheads lurking in Crofton, agreeing to poison their pond with a plant-based fish-killer. Fox's announcement follows the recommendations of a scientific panel that met two weeks ago and advocated using rotenone, a root-based substance that disrupts the flow of oxygen to the gills and kills fish in hours. In a recent lab test, juvenile snakeheads from the Crofton pond that ingested the poison died within a day. The panel also recommended killing the pond's vegetation with herbicides before applying the rotenone.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
One biologist will ask the landfill to dig a trench for truckloads of dead fish. A team will work on saving the turtles. And someone better bring the doughnuts. Since a state-convened panel recommended poisoning a Crofton pond to rid it of the northern snakehead, fisheries experts at the state Department of Natural Resources have been planning the demise of the Asian interloper that can breathe air, slither on its fins and survive on land for several days. They have discovered that eradicating the snakehead is not as simple as dumping a fish-killing substance into the pond, what with bureaucratic hurdles and much of the agency's staff on vacation.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
State Natural Resources Secretary J. Charles Fox sealed the fate yesterday of the reportedly hundreds of snakeheads lurking in Crofton, agreeing to poison their pond with a plant-based fish-killer. Fox's announcement follows the recommendations of a scientific panel that met two weeks ago and advocated using rotenone, a root-based substance that disrupts the flow of oxygen to the gills and kills fish within hours. In a recent lab test, juvenile snakeheads from the Crofton pond that ingested the poison died within a day. The panel also recommended killing the pond's vegetation with herbicides before applying the rotenone.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Water chestnuts, not the ones you get at a Chinese restaurant, but noxious plants with spiked seed pods that can cut through a flip-flop, have reappeared in Chesapeake Bay tributaries, threatening to choke off the waterways.The plants, believed to have been introduced to the United States from Eurasia in the late 1800s and first seen in the Potomac River in the 1920s, have nearly covered Owens Creek off the Bird River in Baltimore County and Lloyds Creek off the Sassafras River on the Eastern Shore, according to John Surrick, spokesman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | September 9, 2006
I have a weed with thorns on the stems and leaves and now a small purple flower. It's killing my phlox and invading the lawn. I pull it, but the roots are never ending. The weed in your photo is Canadian thistle, an invasive Eurasian perennial with a deep, extensive root system. Don't hand-pull this weed because any piece of missed root will sprout into additional plants. (You can very carefully dig up tiny seedlings before roots are established.) In your ornamental bed, spray an herbicide that contains glyphosate on foliage or freshly cut stems.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
As birds sang in blossoming pear trees outside the McGinnis farmhouse in northern Baltimore County, a tanker truck with a 75-foot-wide boom rumbled across the family's fields, spraying chemicals. The nozzles were shooting phosphorus to fertilize the cornfield. In a few days, workers plan to make a second pass to spray atrazine, a herbicide that kills thistle and other weeds that sprout between rows. About 75 percent of American corn farmers over the past half-century have made a springtime ritual out of spraying atrazine, using about 70 million pounds every year as a labor-saving alternative to tilling to remove weeds.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | April 17, 2005
How safe is the herbicide Roundup in vegetable gardens? This has become a tricky issue. In the past, Roundup was approved for use on vegetable gardens under certain conditions because it contained only glyphosate, which was deemed safe to use around food plants. New versions of Roundup, however, contain diquat or other chemicals, plus glyphosate. These new formulations, such as Roundup Plus, are not safe to use in vegetable gardens. Gardeners are not alerted to this change on the front of the new label.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | March 28, 2004
I recently purchased a bottle of Roundup Plus herbicide and noticed that it contained a new chemical called diquat. What is diquat? Is it safe? Diquat is not new; it is just new to Roundup. Roundup herbicide has been on the market for at least 25 years, and I have never known it to contain any other active ingredient besides glyphosate. Glyphosate is the chemical that actually kills the plant ("root and all"). It is blended with inert ingredients to make what is called a formulation. I have seen many different Roundup formulations, but this is the first time I've seen a second active ingredient.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2002
The fish live. Two months after Crofton's snakehead infestation became an international sensation, one month after a panel of experts picked its poison to flush the fish from the pond, and almost two weeks after a herbicide cocktail was sprayed over the water, the fish are still biting. "There are still fish alive in the pond," John Surrick, a Department of Natural Resources spokesman who was at the pond yesterday, said ominously. "You can see them scatter as birds swoop across the surface."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2002
As T-shirt vendors hawked their wares and the curious made a detour from their Sunday morning coffee run, a small boat bobbed in Maryland's most famous pond, spraying the first batch of chemicals that scientists hope will kill the voracious northern snakehead. State fisheries biologists gathered before dawn yesterday in Crofton, and spraying began just after 7 a.m. under the watchful eye of a media horde corralled along a wedge of shoreline by yellow police crime scene tape. The airboat moved slowly back and forth across the homely, nameless pond, the driver directing a stream of two herbicides from a 100-gallon tank into the water.
NEWS
October 25, 1994
Maryland has a problem with run-offAn extensive study of herbicides in drinking water, released on Oct. 18 by the Environmental Working Group and Physicians for Social Responsibility, found that 14 million Americans in 14 states are drinking water contaminated by five cancer-causing herbicides.The states include the District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia.Most of these herbicides enter water supplies in agricultural run-off from land used to raise animals for human consumption.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 24, 1991
Do you use pesticides in your home or garden? Do you spray your roses? Zap your wasps? Bait your slugs? Poison your rats? Those baits and powders and sprays are pesticides.Pesticide is the generic term for chemicals designed to kill organisms. Insecticides attack insects. Herbicides kill plants. Fungicides kill fungi and so on. The tip-off is the -cide, from the Latin for killer, as in infanticide and genocide.Do you think of pesticides as agricultural products? Last year, we dished them out pretty liberally at home -- 67 million pounds of the stuff, in fact.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 18, 2002
State officials are expected to apply two types of herbicide to three ponds in Crofton today as part of their plan to kill the northern snakehead fish that infest at least one of the ponds. The owners of the ponds -- two separate business entities -- have each signed leases with the state Department of Natural Resources through the end of the year that will allow scientists to treat the ponds. The herbicides will reduce oxygen levels in the water, preparing the ponds for the introduction of poison to kill the fish.
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