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Herbes De Provence

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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 28, 2000
My husband, a college professor, is on sabbatical this semester working on a project that required that he do research in Paris. It didn't take me long to decide that I'd like to accompany him to one of the world's most celebrated culinary meccas, so for several weeks this spring we are living in a Left Bank apartment in France's capital. While my spouse departs for the libraries to pore over musty tomes each day, I pack my shopping bags and head for the nearby food markets. A few blocks away there's an outdoor marche that is crowded with merchants selling fresh seasonal fare.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | April 12, 2008
A few weekends ago, a good friend and I, along with our husbands, hosted a dinner party for eight. I love "co-entertaining" like this because it means that all the planning, the grocery shopping, the cooking and even the frenzied last-minute worrying are shared. For our gathering, my pal and I first chose a menu. It would begin with store-bought blinis garnished with smoked salmon and dollops of creme fraiche. For the main course there would be roasted Cornish hens served atop roasted fennel and fingerling potatoes.
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NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | November 9, 2005
What are herbes de Provence, and where might I purchase them? Herbes de Provence means, literally, herbs from Provence. The term refers to a mixture of herbs that is commonly used in Provence, the region of southeastern France. The mixture contains thyme, rosemary, bay, basil and savory. Marjoram, sage, tarragon, lavender and fennel seed often are included. You can find herbes de Provence in many supermarkets and most specialty food stores in the spice and herb section. Two reliable Internet retailers are at penzeys.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | November 9, 2005
What are herbes de Provence, and where might I purchase them? Herbes de Provence means, literally, herbs from Provence. The term refers to a mixture of herbs that is commonly used in Provence, the region of southeastern France. The mixture contains thyme, rosemary, bay, basil and savory. Marjoram, sage, tarragon, lavender and fennel seed often are included. You can find herbes de Provence in many supermarkets and most specialty food stores in the spice and herb section. Two reliable Internet retailers are at penzeys.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | April 20, 1997
1995 McDowell Grenache Rose, Monterey County ($10).California pink wines normally should be drunk in their first year, but this rose is holding up especially well. It's a bright pink wine with gripping cherry and strawberry fruit seasoned with a nuance of herbes de Provence. This bone-dry, long, complex product is one of the world's finest roses.Pub Date: 4/20/97
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | January 18, 1998
1993 Vina Tarapaca Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve, Maipo Valley ($10).The list of excellent wine producers from Chile continues to grow. This full-bodied, supple cabernet displays concentrated blackberry and chocolate flavors, with a well-integrated earthiness and hint of herbes de Provence. At almost 5 years of age, it's a mature wine with a well-developed bouquet.Pub Date: 1/18/98@
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | June 22, 2005
2003 Ca' del Solo Big House Red ($12). This eclectic blend of six red-wine varieties delivers vibrant fruit and a smooth texture with no tannic edge. It's a medium-bodied, distinctly spicy wine, with touches of blackberry, wild berries, plum and herbes de Provence. It would make a perfect pairing with grilled red meat or chicken, as well as pasta dishes. It has the advantage of coming with a sophisticated, mold-free screw cap.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | August 31, 1997
1995 Domaine de Pierredon Cotes du Rhone ($10).This robust, full-bodied red wine shows all the depth and complexity of a well-made Chateauneuf-du-Pape at half the price. With its intense flavors of blackberry, herbes de Provence and smoked meat, the Pierredon is immensely satisfying now, but it has the structure and fruit to develop for at least three more years -- a conservative estimate.Pub Date: 8/31/97@
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | July 25, 2001
Marietta Old Vine Red, Lot No. 27 ($12). Talk about a rut. I've been recommending this consistent champion value since its lot numbers were in single digits and the price was around $5. It's still one of California's greatest values, offering intense and lush blackberry, black currant, smoked meat and herbes de Provence flavors. Serve this wine with pizza, grilled steaks, pasta or lamb. Its versatility is equaled only by its burly charm.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | April 26, 1995
This gutsy, full-bodied California red delivers a load of complexity for a varietal that is often scorned as hopelessly rustic. It offers intense flavors of herbes de Provence, raspberry, blackberry and black pepper. If this sounds like the description of a fine red zinfandel, that's because this wine does a convincing imitation at a much kinder price. The out-of-fashion Concannon winery has produced a wine from an out-of-fashion grape that is out of this world.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | June 22, 2005
2003 Ca' del Solo Big House Red ($12). This eclectic blend of six red-wine varieties delivers vibrant fruit and a smooth texture with no tannic edge. It's a medium-bodied, distinctly spicy wine, with touches of blackberry, wild berries, plum and herbes de Provence. It would make a perfect pairing with grilled red meat or chicken, as well as pasta dishes. It has the advantage of coming with a sophisticated, mold-free screw cap.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 3, 2004
When I pull out my heavy sweaters from storage and hang them in my closet, I also add this thick, flavorful chowder to my menu. Served simply with a loaf of great bakery bread, it's part of an autumn comfort meal I'm grateful to make while the freshest herbs and vegetables from the farmers' market are still available. Leftovers taste even better the next day after the subtle flavors blend. Tip To lower fat, use smoked turkey ham from the deli instead of bacon and saute the onion and garlic in 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Menu Chicken-and-mushroom chowder Olive ciabatta or baguette Apple slices with cheddar cheese Sparkling water Chicken-and-Mushroom Chowder Makes 6 servings Preparation time: 20 minutes; cooking time: 25 minutes 1/4 cup dried porcini mushrooms 2 slices bacon 1 boneless, skinless chicken breast half 1 onion 2 russet potatoes, chopped 1 can (28 ounces)
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 14, 2004
Veal is an expensive choice for a weeknight dinner, but if you are celebrating a special occasion, it is worth it for its mild, versatile flavor. We've cooked the chops in a skillet to make better use of the delicious pan drippings. We've added a touch of the spice mixture known as herbes de Provence (rosemary, sage, thyme and lavender, available premixed in the spice aisle) and a warm bell-pepper slaw. Serve the veal chops with a spicy Rhone red wine, and for dessert buy those tiny French cakes known as madeleines at a bakery.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | December 12, 2001
2000 McDowell Grenache Rose ($9). A pink wine might seem a bit out of season this time of year, but this excellent rose qualifies as a year-round wine - especially for consumption with ham. McDowell's rose consistently ranks among the best on the planet. It is a worthy rival to the best pink wines of Provence and, like them, can remain fresh for two years rather than one. (Don't push it any longer than that.) It's a bone-dry wine with intense cherry and strawberry flavors, subtle nuances of herbes de Provence and impressive structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 2001
A COMMON Ground is a restaurant critic's nightmare, because there's nothing about it to criticize other than its not having a liquor license. The food is consistently excellent. The service is fine, too; cheerful servers take orders at the counter and then deliver food to the tables. As far as atmosphere goes, no complaints there, either. The shabby-chic concept was invented for this comfortable rowhouse overlooking Hampden's 36th Street. After lunch, if it's nice outside, settle down on the glider on the porch.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | July 25, 2001
Marietta Old Vine Red, Lot No. 27 ($12). Talk about a rut. I've been recommending this consistent champion value since its lot numbers were in single digits and the price was around $5. It's still one of California's greatest values, offering intense and lush blackberry, black currant, smoked meat and herbes de Provence flavors. Serve this wine with pizza, grilled steaks, pasta or lamb. Its versatility is equaled only by its burly charm.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 28, 2000
My husband, a college professor, is on sabbatical this semester working on a project that required that he do research in Paris. It didn't take me long to decide that I'd like to accompany him to one of the world's most celebrated culinary meccas, so for several weeks this spring we are living in a Left Bank apartment in France's capital. While my spouse departs for the libraries to pore over musty tomes each day, I pack my shopping bags and head for the nearby food markets. A few blocks away there's an outdoor marche that is crowded with merchants selling fresh seasonal fare.
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