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By Carole McShane and Carole McShane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2004
AN ILLNESS prompted Smita Patel, a registered pharmacist, to seek an alternative route to good health. After a surgery in 1990, the Highland resident said she struggled with poor health. "My mother wanted me to go back to my roots and apply Indian medicine," Patel said. She began Ayurvedic treatment with herbs and supplements sent to her from her doctor in India. Eventually, her health returned, and in 1996, Patel went on to study Ayurvedic healing -- an Eastern system based on lifestyle, diet and herbal remedies -- in India and the United States.
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NEWS
By ELISSA PETRUZZI and ELISSA PETRUZZI,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2006
Mundo, just a year old, wasn't getting better, and Sevi Kay didn't know what to do. Mundo's skin was so irritated she had wounds from scratching herself, and the doctor's treatments weren't working. That's when the Glen Burnie woman decided to see what she could do for her beloved German shepherd puppy. "She started healing, she got better, she gained more weight," after applying Kay's homemade remedy. Mundo's coat became so shiny a neighbor noticed and asked Kay what she was using.
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NEWS
By ELISSA PETRUZZI and ELISSA PETRUZZI,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2006
Mundo, just a year old, wasn't getting better, and Sevi Kay didn't know what to do. Mundo's skin was so irritated she had wounds from scratching herself, and the doctor's treatments weren't working. That's when the Glen Burnie woman decided to see what she could do for her beloved German shepherd puppy. "She started healing, she got better, she gained more weight," after applying Kay's homemade remedy. Mundo's coat became so shiny a neighbor noticed and asked Kay what she was using.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
With 40 acres of ginseng sprouting on his Garrett County farm, Larry Harding has learned to wait and worry. Rodents and deer can eat his crop. Fungal diseases can attack it. The plants take eight years to produce the twisted, gnarly roots that Harding considers the right size and shape. Although thefts are infrequent, Harding still worries constantly that a rustler will sneak into his fields at night and steal his herbs. "You've got to sleep sometime, and they don't sleep when they're thieving," said Harding, Maryland's leading ginseng producer.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 4, 1997
I am extremely upset with my father's doctor. Three years ago when my dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, I asked if ginkgo would help. The doctor dismissed it as a health food fad not worthy of our consideration.My father continued to decline and we had to put him in a nursing home, which broke our hearts. With all the news now about the benefits of Ginkgo biloba extract for Alzheimer's disease, I am kicking myself for following the physician's advice. Maybe if I had gone against it, my dad would still be at home with us.Now I wonder what other herbal remedies might be worthwhile even though doctors scoff.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
Cumberland -- The University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and two universities plan to build a $60 million research and manufacturing facility in Western Maryland to investigate the health benefits of the region's herbal plants and to market the plants if they work. The plan, proposed by officials at UMBI, Frostburg State and West Virginia University, was announced yesterday at a conference organized to promote the study and use of herbal plants. Sales of medicinal and nutritional herbs generate an estimated $4 billion annually in the United States and $20 billion worldwide, conference organizers said.
FEATURES
By Paddy Calistro and Paddy Calistro,New York Times Special Features | February 22, 1994
These days, if Susan Sarandon's children got an infection, she'd be more likely to take them to an herbalist, a purveyor of ancient Chinese remedies, than to a conventional medical doctor.Tennis legend John McEnroe is more likely to rub on creams containing arnica, an herbal analgesic, than to pop aspirins when he's bruised and sore.A few stars -- Sylvester Stallone, Dolly Parton, Cher -- and even Ronald Reagan were reportedly taking curative herbs long before the trend emerged.But these days, Hollywood headliners exchange names of herbalists the way they used to trade personal trainers' business cards.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,King Features Syndicate | December 2, 1997
We would like your opinion of saw palmetto berries. My husband was on this herb for several months. He felt great and even stopped having to get up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom.When he went to the urologist, he was told to stop taking the herb even though the doctor did reluctantly say that the prostate had shrunk a bit. Since stopping the saw palmetto, my husband hasn't felt as well and is again getting up in the middle of the night to void. He has trouble going back to sleep.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Special to The Sun | April 19, 1994
Herbal teas are once again touted as spring tonics as well as caffeine replacers, and herbal medicines compete with synthetic, high-tech prescription drugs as modern America reaches back to the future for that "natural" touch.But think about hemlock, curare and belladonna. You'll recognize these "all natural" herbs as some of nature's deadliest poisons. They sound a warning note in the rush back to ancient herbal remedies to cure modern ills.Herbs run the gamut from truly helpful, through ineffective, to mildly annoying and onward to deadly dangerous.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | April 1, 1997
As a physician, I must object to the advice you gave a woman whose husband has obvious obstructive prostate symptoms. You described an herbal remedy, saw palmetto extract. I don't think that was the best advice.You should have told her:Your husband probably has a benign prostate condition, but he might have prostate cancer. Detected and treated early, prostate cancer is easily cured. Have him see his doctor -- it could save his life.There are very effective medicines available for benign prostate enlargement, and unlike herbal medicines, they have been approved by the FDA. Simply because a remedy is "natural" doesn't mean it is safe.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
Cumberland -- The University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and two universities plan to build a $60 million research and manufacturing facility in Western Maryland to investigate the health benefits of the region's herbal plants and to market the plants if they work. The plan, proposed by officials at UMBI, Frostburg State and West Virginia University, was announced yesterday at a conference organized to promote the study and use of herbal plants. Sales of medicinal and nutritional herbs generate an estimated $4 billion annually in the United States and $20 billion worldwide, conference organizers said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2005
Echinacea, an herbal remedy popular for fighting the common cold, does not ward off runny noses, sore throats or headaches, nor does it help speed recovery from cold symptoms, according to the results of a broad clinical trial to be reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Taken with other recent studies that showed no benefit from echinacea, the new findings shift the burden of proof to proponents of herbal products to demonstrate that the plant has medicinal value, researchers said.
NEWS
By Carole McShane and Carole McShane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2004
AN ILLNESS prompted Smita Patel, a registered pharmacist, to seek an alternative route to good health. After a surgery in 1990, the Highland resident said she struggled with poor health. "My mother wanted me to go back to my roots and apply Indian medicine," Patel said. She began Ayurvedic treatment with herbs and supplements sent to her from her doctor in India. Eventually, her health returned, and in 1996, Patel went on to study Ayurvedic healing -- an Eastern system based on lifestyle, diet and herbal remedies -- in India and the United States.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 31, 2002
Q. I have been self-medicating with Saint-John's-wort for several months to deal with mild seasonal depression and job-hunting stress. The Saint-John's-wort seems to be helping. I take it morning and evening. I also take Zocor at bedtime. Is there any interaction between Saint-John's-wort and my cholesterol-lowering drug? If so, should I not be taking the herb at all, or should I take it at a different time to have less of an effect on Zocor? My pharmacist and I await your wisdom. A. Saint-John's-wort lowers the blood levels of Zocor, and this might reduce its effectiveness.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
COLUMBIA - Simon Mills, a distinguished British authority on herbal medicines, had just given his most exhilarating pitch for the United States' first graduate program in botanical healing when a hand lifted tentatively in the audience. The young woman looked perplexed. What credential, she wondered, would this new graduate school in Columbia give to legitimize unlicensed practitioners - described through history as apothecaries, phytotherapists, wise women, white Indians, medical herbalists and even snake oil salesmen?
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | December 3, 2000
Q. I haven't had a period for months, and I have been tormented with hot flashes and vaginal dryness. So I tried an over-the-counter herbal remedy for menopause containing black cohosh root, ginseng and chaste tree berry. It eliminated my hot flashes and vaginal dryness. But about three weeks later, my period started! As soon as I quit taking the tablets, my symptoms returned and my period stopped. Can I safely resume the herbal remedy? Will the hot flashes and dryness last forever? My doctor is not an advocate of alternative remedies and recommends the prescription hormone therapy, but I am reluctant to take it. A. Black cohosh and ginseng contain plant chemicals that may mimic estrogen.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
With 40 acres of ginseng sprouting on his Garrett County farm, Larry Harding has learned to wait and worry. Rodents and deer can eat his crop. Fungal diseases can attack it. The plants take eight years to produce the twisted, gnarly roots that Harding considers the right size and shape. Although thefts are infrequent, Harding still worries constantly that a rustler will sneak into his fields at night and steal his herbs. "You've got to sleep sometime, and they don't sleep when they're thieving," said Harding, Maryland's leading ginseng producer.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 26, 2000
Q. Instead of taking an aspirin a day for the heart, does it make sense to take ground willow bark from the health food store? I worry about the side effects of aspirin. A. Although willow bark contains salicylates -- natural aspirin-like compounds -- we don't think there is an advantage in using this medicinal plant. Aspirin is available in several well-standardized doses, including 81 milligrams in an enteric-coated tablet designed to minimize stomach irritation. Doses of willow bark, like those of other herbs, might not be standardized.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Hannah Goodmuth isn't particularly fond of pulling weeds from her family's Woodstock yard. But yesterday, she tackled the weeds of a far larger yard: Patapsco Valley State Park. Participating in the park's first Garlic Mustard Challenge, 10-year-old Hannah and her team pulled up more than 86 pounds of a weed that has been crowding out many of the native plants along the Patapsco River. "We want the butterflies to live and the other plants to grow," Hannah said, in between yanking up dozens and dozens of the 2- to 3-foot plants.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | March 26, 2000
Q. Instead of taking an aspirin a day for the heart, does it make sense to take ground willow bark from the health food store? I worry about the side effects of aspirin. A. Although willow bark contains salicylates -- natural aspirin-like compounds -- we don't think there is an advantage in using this medicinal plant. Aspirin is available in several well-standardized doses, including 81 milligrams in an enteric-coated tablet designed to minimize stomach irritation. Doses of willow bark, like those of other herbs, might not be standardized.
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