Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHerbal Medicine
IN THE NEWS

Herbal Medicine

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 12, 2007
Tai Sophia board elects Mills Simon Mills, an international authority on herbal medicine, has been elected to the board of trustees of Tai Sophia Institute, a graduate educational institution in North Laurel. Mills, who will serve a three-year term as a member of the board, founded the institute's master of science in herbal medicine program and was its first director from 2000 to 2006. He is a director of Plant Medicine CIC, a new international educational resource for health care professionals and the public.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
With its four terraces of thriving plants sloping down toward a babbling lily pond, Jim Duke's garden could certainly be considered a healing place. And that's precisely what the world-renowned botanist and author's Green Farmacy Garden is. Featuring 80 plots that showcase 300 plants for whatever ails you — from addictions to yeast infections and everything in between — the garden is a living catalog of herbal medicine. From 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, the Howard County Conservancy will sponsor a lecture and guided tour of the garden at the Fulton home Jim Duke shares with his wife, Peggy.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 9, 2006
Tai Sophia's Snow given new post James Snow, a faculty member at Tai Sophia Institute in the herbal medicine program, has been appointed director of the master in science degree program. Snow assisted the program's first director, Simon Mills, in developing the first graduate-level degree program in herbal medicine in the United States. Mills will continue to teach in the program. Printing association appoints Walker Kyle Walker, president of E.H. Walker Supply Co. Inc. in Rockville, has been named chairman of the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic, a Columbia-based printers trade association representing printing and graphics firms in Maryland, Virginia, Washington and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 12, 2007
Tai Sophia board elects Mills Simon Mills, an international authority on herbal medicine, has been elected to the board of trustees of Tai Sophia Institute, a graduate educational institution in North Laurel. Mills, who will serve a three-year term as a member of the board, founded the institute's master of science in herbal medicine program and was its first director from 2000 to 2006. He is a director of Plant Medicine CIC, a new international educational resource for health care professionals and the public.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
Tai Sophia Institute holds open house Tai Sophia Institute, 7750 Montpelier Road, North Laurel, will hold an open house tomorrow for those interested in its graduate programs in acupuncture, herbal medicine and applied healing arts. Starting at 9:30 a.m., visitors will have an opportunity to meet faculty members, students and graduates of the three master's programs. A panel of students, graduates and faculty members will discuss each program and take questions. Members of the institute's admissions staff will answer questions.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Special to the Sun | June 24, 2005
Jim Duke grows a medicine cabinet in his back yard. The elegant, tiered garden, created by the retired government botanist, contains hundreds of plant species grouped for treatment of some 80 diseases and ailments. Engraved stones mark each section: Bronchitis, Diabetes, Glaucoma, Addictions, Wrinkles, Parkinson's Disease, Obesity and on and on. For the 76-year-old Duke, an authority in the field of herbal medicine and a prolific author on the subject, the garden at his Fulton home in Howard County, where he holds dozens of tours a year, is his main venue for educating the public about ancient herbal traditions and new botanical discoveries.
NEWS
June 12, 2005
Cedar Lane School holding an `Aloha' party this week The Cedar Lane School community will hold an "Aloha" celebration, to mark the closing of the facility at 5451 Beaverkill Road and anticipate the opening of the new Cedar Lane facility in Fulton. The celebration, which will include food and entertainment, will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday at the old building in Columbia. The new school, on the Lime Kiln Middle School campus, is to open in August. The Cedar Lane School serves severely disabled students ages 3 to 21 in Howard County.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
With its four terraces of thriving plants sloping down toward a babbling lily pond, Jim Duke's garden could certainly be considered a healing place. And that's precisely what the world-renowned botanist and author's Green Farmacy Garden is. Featuring 80 plots that showcase 300 plants for whatever ails you — from addictions to yeast infections and everything in between — the garden is a living catalog of herbal medicine. From 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, the Howard County Conservancy will sponsor a lecture and guided tour of the garden at the Fulton home Jim Duke shares with his wife, Peggy.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 28, 1993
Sounding a "wake-up call" for the medical profession, a study published today says Americans seek treatment from chiropractors, acupuncturists and other unconventional practitioners more often than from internists, pediatricians and other primary-care doctors.One in 3 adults tried relaxation therapy, herbal cures, massage or some other unorthodox treatment for aches and pains in 1990, the year the nationwide survey was conducted.When it came to shelling out their own cash, the survey found that Americans spent $10.3 billion on unconventional healers -- nearly as much as they paid in out-of-pocket hospital bills.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
COLUMBIA - Simon Mills, a distinguished British authority on herbal medicines, had just given his most exhilarating pitch for the United States' first graduate program in botanical healing when a hand lifted tentatively in the audience. The young woman looked perplexed. What credential, she wondered, would this new graduate school in Columbia give to legitimize unlicensed practitioners - described through history as apothecaries, phytotherapists, wise women, white Indians, medical herbalists and even snake oil salesmen?
NEWS
July 13, 2007
Tai Sophia Institute holds open house Tai Sophia Institute, 7750 Montpelier Road, North Laurel, will hold an open house tomorrow for those interested in its graduate programs in acupuncture, herbal medicine and applied healing arts. Starting at 9:30 a.m., visitors will have an opportunity to meet faculty members, students and graduates of the three master's programs. A panel of students, graduates and faculty members will discuss each program and take questions. Members of the institute's admissions staff will answer questions.
NEWS
August 9, 2006
Tai Sophia's Snow given new post James Snow, a faculty member at Tai Sophia Institute in the herbal medicine program, has been appointed director of the master in science degree program. Snow assisted the program's first director, Simon Mills, in developing the first graduate-level degree program in herbal medicine in the United States. Mills will continue to teach in the program. Printing association appoints Walker Kyle Walker, president of E.H. Walker Supply Co. Inc. in Rockville, has been named chairman of the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic, a Columbia-based printers trade association representing printing and graphics firms in Maryland, Virginia, Washington and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Special to the Sun | June 24, 2005
Jim Duke grows a medicine cabinet in his back yard. The elegant, tiered garden, created by the retired government botanist, contains hundreds of plant species grouped for treatment of some 80 diseases and ailments. Engraved stones mark each section: Bronchitis, Diabetes, Glaucoma, Addictions, Wrinkles, Parkinson's Disease, Obesity and on and on. For the 76-year-old Duke, an authority in the field of herbal medicine and a prolific author on the subject, the garden at his Fulton home in Howard County, where he holds dozens of tours a year, is his main venue for educating the public about ancient herbal traditions and new botanical discoveries.
NEWS
June 12, 2005
Cedar Lane School holding an `Aloha' party this week The Cedar Lane School community will hold an "Aloha" celebration, to mark the closing of the facility at 5451 Beaverkill Road and anticipate the opening of the new Cedar Lane facility in Fulton. The celebration, which will include food and entertainment, will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday at the old building in Columbia. The new school, on the Lime Kiln Middle School campus, is to open in August. The Cedar Lane School serves severely disabled students ages 3 to 21 in Howard County.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2001
With a master's degree program that has doubled in enrollment in the past five years, the Traditional Acupuncture Institute in Columbia has embarked on an ambitious expansion program. Now known as Tai Sophia Institute, the school has added two master's degree programs in complementary medicine and acquired 12 acres for a new campus. Bob Duggan, Tai Sophia Institute president, said the school will move from its 20,000-square-foot space in the American Cities Building to a new 45,000-square- foot building three miles south.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
COLUMBIA - Simon Mills, a distinguished British authority on herbal medicines, had just given his most exhilarating pitch for the United States' first graduate program in botanical healing when a hand lifted tentatively in the audience. The young woman looked perplexed. What credential, she wondered, would this new graduate school in Columbia give to legitimize unlicensed practitioners - described through history as apothecaries, phytotherapists, wise women, white Indians, medical herbalists and even snake oil salesmen?
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2001
With a master's degree program that has doubled in enrollment in the past five years, the Traditional Acupuncture Institute in Columbia has embarked on an ambitious expansion program. Now known as Tai Sophia Institute, the school has added two master's degree programs in complementary medicine and acquired 12 acres for a new campus. Bob Duggan, Tai Sophia Institute president, said the school will move from its 20,000-square-foot space in the American Cities Building to a new 45,000-square- foot building three miles south.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 28, 1993
Sounding a "wake-up call" for the medical profession, a study published today says Americans seek treatment from chiropractors, acupuncturists and other unconventional practitioners more often than from internists, pediatricians and other primary-care doctors.One in 3 adults tried relaxation therapy, herbal cures, massage or some other unorthodox treatment for aches and pains in 1990, the year the nationwide survey was conducted.When it came to shelling out their own cash, the survey found that Americans spent $10.3 billion on unconventional healers -- nearly as much as they paid in out-of-pocket hospital bills.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.