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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 1996
The federal government has issued a warning to Americans not to buy any of the Chinese herbal products being sold as "legal highs," because they can cause heart attacks, seizures, psychotic episodes or even death.The Food and Drug Administration has focused on widely available products with names like Herbal Ecstacy, Ultimate XPhoria and Cloud 9 because they contain ephedra, or ma huang. Used for centuries in China, it is the herbal form of the central nervous system stimulant ephedrine, which can act on the body like methamphetamine, commonly known as speed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2010
Spring officially arrived, thank goodness. We're ready for the bounty of herbs soon to come. Happily, a recent meal at T'afia, an eclectic restaurant in Houston, made our herb-loving hearts beat faster. Chef Monica Pope served a mound of red quinoa with quickly seared scallops and an herb-laden sauce that we nearly licked off the plate. We started garden-planning immediately: flat-leaf parsley for flower-bed borders everywhere. Plenty of pots of tender cilantro near the back door for easy kitchen use. The inspirational sauce, a Moroccan staple known as chermoula, uses lots of parsley and aromatic cilantro.
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NEWS
By Julie Sevrens Lyons and Julie Sevrens Lyons,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 17, 2000
It wasn't that long ago that mothers gave their children cod liver oil to keep them healthy. Nowadays, many prefer to dish out herbs, things such as cherry bark and astragalus, horehound and lemon balm. Sunny Mavor, in fact, can rattle off the names of more than 50 plant-based products she has tried out on her son and daughter in the past few years. The Bozeman, Mont., mother's affinity for herbal alternatives to drugs is shared by hundreds of thousands of Americans, more and more of whom are buying herbal products for their kids despite potential safety risks.
NEWS
February 14, 2010
Tai Sophia Institute will offer five new graduate certificate programs: health coaching, herbal studies, medical herbalism, transformative leadership and wellness coaching. Each course is 12 to 15 graduate credits and is offered in an executive format for nine to 11 weekends. Founded in 1974 and located at 7750 Montpelier Road in Laurel, Tai Sophia is a center for wellness-based education, clinical services in acupuncture, nutrition counseling and herbal medicine. The institute is accredited by the Maryland State Commission on Higher Education.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
The eight-member inaugural class in the botanical healing program at Tai Sophia Institute for the Healing Arts near Columbia will graduate next month, armed with master's degrees and three years' worth of knowledge in the therapeutic use of herbs. They also know human anatomy, botany and chemistry, and how botanical remedies interact with conventional pharmaceuticals. But it's unclear where these qualifications will take the trained herbalists as they strike out on their own in the burgeoning natural products industry with hopes of finding work as clinicians, researchers and educators.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
Pharmacist Smita Patel has passed out prescription medicines and kindly herbal advice to customers who entered her stone-front store on Route 108 for seven years. But this year, by customer demand, she stopped filling bottles with pills, and instead hands out only herbs, teas and advice that she hopes will be profitable for her clients and her business. Patel's business has become a center in Highland for holistic practices. Patel does consultations and recommends herbal remedies to help with clients' ailments.
NEWS
October 1, 1998
The Philadelphia Inquirer said in an editorial Tuesday:LET'S say you're healthy. You hear other healthy people sing the praises of ginseng, garlic extract, St. John's wort, echinacea, Vitamin E. You can get these things over the counter, without seeing a doctor.Or let's say you're sick. What the doctor prescribes doesn't work. So you try another route -- alternative medicines, vitamins, herbs.For years, established medicine ignored and decried these medicines. They were off the official radar.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | February 25, 1998
Herbal dressings are real winnersLocal violin teacher Cynthia Swiss decided to sell her fat-free herbal dressings and marinades when they won grand championship and first-place awards at the Anne Arundel County Fair. She's marketed two under the name Falls Farms: white wine and basil, and ginger and lemon herb.For $5.50 a bottle, you get lots of flavor and only 15 calories a serving. Swiss' dressings can be found at the Coffee Mill in Baltimore, the Hidden Garden in Arbutus and the Horizon Nursery in Freeland.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 2002
Friendly Thyme Herb Club is sponsoring a delightful day of lectures, workshops and demonstrations at its second biennial herb symposium. "You Use Herbs for What?" is the theme of the event scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 14 at St. John Lutheran Church, 300 W. Maple Road in Linthicum. Madeline and Tom Wadja of Willow Pond Farm in Pennsylvania will be guest speakers. Their presentation, "Growing Herbs for Fun and Profit, or Can this Marriage Be Saved?" will cover their love of gardening and use of herbs as they journeyed from the farmland of Ohio, to service in the U.S. diplomatic corps, to their retirement occupation of organic gardening.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
Representatives of the makers of an herbal supplement linked to the death of Orioles prospect Steve Bechler fought back yesterday against allegations that the supplement - ephedra - contributed to his fatal heatstroke. Bechler, 23, died Monday after collapsing during workouts the day before at Orioles spring training camp in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Pills of a product containing ephedra were found in his locker, and the local medical examiner said the substance almost certainly played a role in the death and should be banned by Major League Baseball.
NEWS
By Henry I. Miller | January 13, 2009
Many Americans are at risk from the combinations of prescription pills, over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements and foods they consume. According to a recent academic study, more than half of adults ages 57 to 85 use five or more prescription or nonprescription drugs, and about 4 percent take them in combinations that could cause dangerous interactions. Surely these health threats lurking on supermarket and drugstore shelves are addressed by federal food and drug regulation, right?
NEWS
By DONNA DEANE and DONNA DEANE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 4, 2006
Maybe it started with the mint in the mojito. Maybe it's those wonderful drinks with lots of basil and ginger you find in Vietnamese restaurants or fusion cafes. Whatever the reason, when it comes to cocktails, it feels like an herbal moment. What could be cooler than a cucumber martini? Why, an herbal cucumber martini. Take a handful of chervil from the farmers' market -- the flavor is as delicate as its leaf, almost like tarragon that's been sent to finishing school. Muddle it with cucumber in a mortar, and infuse it into gin with a splash of dry white vermouth, then strain it into a martini glass.
NEWS
By ELISSA PETRUZZI and ELISSA PETRUZZI,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2006
Mundo, just a year old, wasn't getting better, and Sevi Kay didn't know what to do. Mundo's skin was so irritated she had wounds from scratching herself, and the doctor's treatments weren't working. That's when the Glen Burnie woman decided to see what she could do for her beloved German shepherd puppy. "She started healing, she got better, she gained more weight," after applying Kay's homemade remedy. Mundo's coat became so shiny a neighbor noticed and asked Kay what she was using.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
Cumberland -- The University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and two universities plan to build a $60 million research and manufacturing facility in Western Maryland to investigate the health benefits of the region's herbal plants and to market the plants if they work. The plan, proposed by officials at UMBI, Frostburg State and West Virginia University, was announced yesterday at a conference organized to promote the study and use of herbal plants. Sales of medicinal and nutritional herbs generate an estimated $4 billion annually in the United States and $20 billion worldwide, conference organizers said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2005
Echinacea, an herbal remedy popular for fighting the common cold, does not ward off runny noses, sore throats or headaches, nor does it help speed recovery from cold symptoms, according to the results of a broad clinical trial to be reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Taken with other recent studies that showed no benefit from echinacea, the new findings shift the burden of proof to proponents of herbal products to demonstrate that the plant has medicinal value, researchers said.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
Looking for an alternative to the flu shot? As vaccine stocks dwindle, there are hints that people are turning to herbal, homeopathic and other alternative remedies. Oscillococcinum, an alternative flu remedy made by the Boiron Group of France, bolted to the top of Drugstore.com's sales chart soon after the vaccine shortage was announced, company officials say. Vitacost.com, an online vitamin and supplement retailer, briefly sold out of its oscillococcinum supply. "There was a big spike," says president Allen Josephs.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
The eight-member inaugural class in the botanical healing program at Tai Sophia Institute for the Healing Arts near Columbia will graduate next month, armed with master's degrees and three years' worth of knowledge in the therapeutic use of herbs. They also know human anatomy, botany and chemistry, and how botanical remedies interact with conventional pharmaceuticals. But it's unclear where these qualifications will take the trained herbalists as they strike out on their own in the burgeoning natural products industry with hopes of finding work as clinicians, researchers and educators.
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