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By Carleton Jones | May 25, 1991
Not many ornamental garden items can also revitalize home (( cooking, but the ones that can are hardy, fragrant and on occasion beautiful. An herb garden takes a little organizing and laying out to become an eye-catcher, but the double benefit -- good looks and good flavor -- are both hardy perennials.The proper mixture of a little science and a lot of common sense is the secret to garden success with herbs, says Janet Walker, curator of the National Herb Garden in Washington and a scheduled lecturer today at the fifth annual Baltimore Herb Festival.
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By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Stephanie Groth's passion for gardening stretches back more than 40 years, when she became a charter member of the Ferndale Garden Club. Yet it wasn't until she retired in 2000 that she had the time to indulge in her passion. When she moved into her home, the 1/5-acre yard consisted of grass and a couple of Burford holly bushes. To brighten it up, she planted some flowers around her mailbox. That modest beginning was the start of a complete yard makeover. Today a mulched path and stepping stones wind through a sloping backyard that features a waterfall and koi pond.
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By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Contributing Writer | March 28, 1993
Picture yourself in this all-too-common household dilemma:Dinner time approaches and so do your guests. But you, the cook, are in trouble. The soup tastes flat; the fish needs seasoning. The salad is boring and the white rolls look hopelessly bland.Do you throw open the cupboard doors, looking desperately for something in a jar to make things right?No, you calmly walk outside and snip off some oregano for the soup, a sprig of savory for the fish, basil for the salad and a bit of thyme and rosemary to mix with the butter for those rolls.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | December 20, 2009
While many garden clubs work to shed the dusty image of white-gloved flower-arrangers for a more modern one of community service, the members of the Glen Arm Garden Club are busy helping others, well, arrange flowers. On this morning in December, members of the club are making their regular visit to Morningside House assisted living in Parkville, where they help a dozen or so residents create flower arrangements for the dining room and another one each can take to her own room. "It is nice for them to come," said Arsala Ewing, in her holiday-inspired teddy bear sweat shirt.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2001
WOULD YOU rather stroll through a magnificent herb garden or view an art exhibit? At Saturday's "Herbs and Artists" program in Ferndale, there will be no need to choose. You can do both. The program will be at the home of Sue Latini, who has cultivated a garden with more than 130 varieties of herbs. Here, you'll find the familiar - such as oregano and rosemary - and the uncommon. Ever heard of elecampane? It's a plant favored by goldfinches, which love to eat its seeds. "I try to put in something new each year," Latini said.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 28, 2000
Half-hidden by enormous maples on the main street of Keedysville in Washington County, the 19th-century brick house and gardens of Seven Gates Farm look like something out of a storybook. An Arabian Nights-style urn is stuffed with long, green Egyptian onions in the living room, and white clematis froths over a wooden bench outside. The house is lovely, but the gardens -- a marriage of formal design and idiosyncratic touches -- are truly spectacular. They are the work of James Cramer and Dean Johnson, editors at Country Home and Country Garden magazines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | March 17, 2005
Your own herb garden Don't let the winter weather stop you from planting an herb garden. Learn how to create a tiny herb garden for the windowsill, porch or patio tomorrow or Saturday at the Cylburn Arboretum Association in a workshop led by city naturalist Glenda Weber. Participants will be provided with all the materials needed and will be treated to goodies made with fresh herbs. The cost is $15 for members and $17 for nonmembers. Friday's class is at 12:15 p.m., and Saturday's class is at 10:15 a.m. Advance reservations are necessary.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | June 27, 1994
Eleven students from Ferndale Elementary School's recent class of sixth-grade graduates made the honor roll. They are: David Bush, John Cargo, Rachel Engel, Kristen Fitzgerald, Dana Hooe, Elizabeth Horn, Shannon Mason, Frank Maule, David Radford, Dana Semmont and Steven Webster.The Presidential Fitness Award for Excellence for carrying a 4.0 average went to David Radford. David Bush and Elizabeth Horn also received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Efforts.During graduation, the class gave Ferndale Elementary two beautiful potted plants that now decorate the school office.
FEATURES
By Beverly Bundy and Beverly Bundy,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | April 4, 1992
You don't have to be Martha Stewart to have your own herb garden.In fact, if you've got Martha's money, you really don't need your own herb garden. Cooks in Ms. Stewart's sphere probably don't blanch at the $1.50 charged for a 1/2 ounce of fresh-cut herbs in grocery stores.But those who want to add freshness to the kitchen repertoire without crippling the week's food budget can grow their own herbs with little garden expertise and a minimal cash outlay.An herb plant bought at almost any local nursery will cost about the same as that supermarket 1/2 ounce and will yield fresh flavor for the entire growing season and, in the case of perennials, for many growing seasons to come.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1998
FERNDALE UNITED Methodist Church, 117 Ferndale Road, is having vacation Bible school Aug. 10 to 14 at the church.Crafts, games and Bible stories will be available for children. A light dinner will be served at 5 p.m., and classes will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.Information or registration: 410-761-2880.Massage therapyMary Ann Roesler, a massage therapist, is offering five-minute massages to senior citizens Aug. 10 and 24 at Burwood Senior Housing, 6658 Shelly Road.Participants will have a choice of head, foot, back or neck massage.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | April 20, 2009
The first of the season's festive street fairs in Baltimore County comes to Towson on Thursday, promising to make Courthouse Plaza greener, sweeter and livelier. Towson Gardens Day opens at 10 a.m. along West Pennsylvania and Baltimore avenues and encircling the courthouse fountain plaza with nearly 100 vendors, musicians and environmental educators. "The emphasis this year is on native plants and pollinators, and natural fertilizers," said Dolores K. Shamer, chairwoman of the event that began in the 1980s.
NEWS
By VIRGINIA A. SMITH and VIRGINIA A. SMITH,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | June 25, 2006
Kathy Hawkins is crazy about summer basil. She grows it outside, inside, everywhere she can. She even keeps a pot of it on the kitchen counter, so all she has to do is pinch off the leaves, chop them up and sprinkle them on her luscious homegrown tomatoes. With every pinch, there's a bonus. That heavenly basil fragrance fills her kitchen for hours. "I absolutely love that smell," she says. Hawkins, 46, is not an expert by any means, but she successfully grows lots of herbs every summer.
NEWS
By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2006
One of the greatest things about making an herb garden is there are so many choices. It's also one of the worst. So. Many. Choices. Especially if you define "herb" as our ancestors did: any plant useful to humankind. That is why it's helpful to have a theme. The theme can be sentimental (herbs that Grandmother grew) or practical (herbs to scent the closets and repel the bugs), or even disease-focused. For example, Topher Dulaney, a San Francisco landscape architect and cancer survivor, makes inspirational herb gardens using plants that are sources for drugs used in chemotherapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | March 17, 2005
Your own herb garden Don't let the winter weather stop you from planting an herb garden. Learn how to create a tiny herb garden for the windowsill, porch or patio tomorrow or Saturday at the Cylburn Arboretum Association in a workshop led by city naturalist Glenda Weber. Participants will be provided with all the materials needed and will be treated to goodies made with fresh herbs. The cost is $15 for members and $17 for nonmembers. Friday's class is at 12:15 p.m., and Saturday's class is at 10:15 a.m. Advance reservations are necessary.
NEWS
July 11, 2004
On June 21, 2004, HERBERT FAIRFIELD GORDON, 73, of Woodlawn, Baltimore County died of cancer. Mr. Gordon was the son of Faith Fairchild Gordon, M.D. and Hugh Gordon, golf professional. The early years of his life were spent in Richmond, Virginia. After graduating from Washington and Lee University, he came to Maryland to teach high school English in Port Deposit. He soon found his love of literature was stronger than his love of teaching and he went to work as a film editor of the Milner Fenwick Company retiring from there in the late 1980's.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | May 16, 2004
You're exhausted. You've just finished painting the ceiling. And frankly, you'd like to never look at a paint roller again. Unfortunately, however, you've just noticed a few missed spots. You scream. Glidden hears your pain. Its new product -- Glidden Ceiling Paint with EZ Track Technology -- takes the guesswork out of painting the ceiling. Simple to apply, quick-drying and uncomplicated, the paint goes on pink and dries white. No more recoats or touch-ups. You see exactly where you've painted and where you need to paint.
NEWS
July 11, 2004
On June 21, 2004, HERBERT FAIRFIELD GORDON, 73, of Woodlawn, Baltimore County died of cancer. Mr. Gordon was the son of Faith Fairchild Gordon, M.D. and Hugh Gordon, golf professional. The early years of his life were spent in Richmond, Virginia. After graduating from Washington and Lee University, he came to Maryland to teach high school English in Port Deposit. He soon found his love of literature was stronger than his love of teaching and he went to work as a film editor of the Milner Fenwick Company retiring from there in the late 1980's.
FEATURES
August 2, 1998
Q. Some of the plants in my beautiful flower and herb garden (sage, coreopsis, thyme, salvia) are dying even though they are well-watered and fertilized. The stems turn black and they just PTC fold up. Is this a disease problem? What can I do about it?A.Sounds like Southern blight, a significant soil-borne fungal disease of annuals and perennials that is encouraged by hot, humid weather. Affected lower stems turn brown or black, and foliage wilts and dies.Tan-colored fungal fruiting bodies, the size of a small seed, may be seen on affected stems.
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | April 25, 2004
The best way to design an herb garden is with an open mind. After you check parsley, thyme and basil off the list of essential culinary plants for your new garden, keep going. An herb garden needn't be limited to plants you can cook with. "Herbs are a great, diverse group of plants," says Jim Adams, curator of the 2.5 acre National Herb Garden at the National Arboretum in Washington. "For the purpose of this garden, an herb is any plant that has a use. Annuals, perennials, trees, shrubs, vines and aquatic plants can all be herbs."
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | June 15, 2003
Picture yourself on an exotic tropical island. Living in paradise in your own little world. Relaxing, savoring the sun, sipping something tasty. You could have the life -- well, almost -- in your own backyard. Yes, your own lovely backyard. Home designer John Hardy, who has lived in Bali for the past 27 years, has created a backyard paradise for average folks. OK, not exactly average folks. But for homeowners who can afford to toss around $15,000. Hardy's creation is a Bale, an open-sided bamboo pavilion with grass-thatched roof, like ancient Hindu living quarters.
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