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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1999
The trainer from New York put his horse and groom on a van, pointed them toward Maryland and sent along instructions for Edgar Prado: Come from off the pace.That simple formula worked for Belmont-based trainer Richard Schosberg and his fast-closing Karly's Harley. The 3-year-old gelding charged from last yesterday to win the Herat Stakes, a 1 1/16-mile race worth $54,025 at Laurel Park.Karly's Harley is a son of Harlan, the 10-year-old stallion who died two weeks ago of a ruptured aorta in the breeding shed at Stone Farm in Paris, Ky.Harlan's promising son became the latest New York invader to capture Maryland stakes money when he allowed the three local entrants -- Lead Em Home, Perfect Score and Raire Standard -- to battle on the lead from the break all the way into the homestretch.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 11, 2007
HERAT, Afghanistan -- The number of civilians killed in bombing by foreign forces Tuesday night was much higher than the official figure of 21 and might rise as high as 80, residents reached by telephone said yesterday. The residents' tally differed from that given by Ezatullah, a government administrator of the Sangin region who uses one name. He said he had spent four to five hours in the village of Sarwan Qala yesterday and that the civilian death toll remained 21. The U.S. military has stood by its original statement, in which it said it called in the airstrikes on Taliban insurgents after a 16-hour battle and destroyed three militant compounds.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
Could the Meyerhoff-Delp team be back in the national eye? A horse named Viv could make it so.In his first attempt around two turns, the Harry and Tom Meyerhoff-owned Viv out-dueled a game Mixed Count yesterday and won the $54,100 Herat Stakes at Laurel Park.The margin after 1 1/16 miles was a half-length, possibly putting Viv on the Triple Crown trail traveled by the Meyerhoffs' Spectacular Bid 17 years ago.Harry Meyerhoff said he and trainer Buddy Delp "do have Triple )) Crown intentions and we'll just have to be patient and see how he develops."
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | February 14, 2006
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -- The rumors fly around in this dusty old city like lint in the wind. There's talk of kidnappings that may or may not have happened. Talk of al-Qaida or the Taliban calling for the abduction of Western women. Talk of the Taliban and al-Qaida resurgence. Kabul is an ugly city, for the most part, a ramble of low structures, some still showing damage from the wars that have been fought here in the last three decades. The air is full of choking dust blowing particles of stuff you don't even want to think about.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
The focus was on Just Call Me Carl's first try at a two-turn race, but Spartan Cat blurred the picture yesterday.Marathon Farms' runner came barreling from off the pace in an outside lane and won the $54,550 Herat Stakes at Laurel Park by two lengths, further scrambling Maryland's Kentucky Derby picture.Just Call Me Carl -- a winner of three straight -- finished third, beaten by a nose by runner-up Mr. Business, who was expected to provide the major competition in the 1 1/16-mile test.The field included five Triple Crown nominees and three stakes winners.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1995
Maryland racing fans finally might have a local horse worth rooting for in this year's Triple Crown.Trainer Carlos Garcia unveiled a new and improved He's Got Gall in the Herat Stakes yesterday at Laurel Park, giving jockey Mark Johnston his fourth win on the card and hopes of more lucrative days to come this spring.The handsome 3-year-old colt, equipped with blinkers for the first time and appearing much more focused than in his last race when he was beaten in the Dancing Count Stakes six weeks ago, responded with a 1 1/4 -length victory over the 6-1 fourth choice, Smart Car.The competition was only moderate -- all the entries were eligible for a 7-pound weight allowance and the weights at 113 pounds were so light that all except one of the jockeys carried 1 pound overweight.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 27, 2000
Long-shot Icarian came motoring from far back yesterday, reaching the front in time to catch pacesetter Hades and win the seventh running of the $50,000-added Herat Stakes for 3-year-olds at Laurel Park by a neck. Icarian, a gelded son of Smarten who was bred by his owner, Bonsal White, completed the 1 1/16th-mile distance in 1: 45 1/5 over a fast main track. His surprise victory rewarded his backers with a $59.80 win mutuel. Hades held onto second and Country Signature was third. The 10-5 exacta returned $235.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
Smoke Glacken took a giant stride toward the spring classics yesterday with an electrifying performance in the $100,000 Southwest Stakes at Oaklawn Park.The Maryland-bred gray colt won the one-mile race -- his first ever around two turns -- by eight lengths. None of the other seven 3-year-old in the race, including two trained by the Triple Crown master himself, D. Wayne Lukas, even challenged him.The Southwest was a key race in the winter schedule of Smoke Glacken, a son of Two Punch and Majesty's Crown.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 23, 2003
HERAT, Afghanistan - Peace reigns, finally, in this province bordering Iran, which is no small accomplishment given the number of wars here over the past decades, and given the violence that continues elsewhere in Afghanistan. There is a show of orderliness in Herat's refurbished government buildings, on streets that have been paved and widened, in schools newly built, at the hospital set amid gardens, an institution that is working as well as it has in living memory. The discipline and quiet, though, cannot be attributed to the postwar efforts of the United States and its allies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - Twenty-one people, including two senior Defense Ministry commanders, were killed in heavy factional fighting overnight in the western province of Herat, in another upset for Afghanistan as it prepares for elections, Afghan officials said yesterday. In what appeared to be coordinated attacks, forces from three neighboring provinces moved on districts in Herat Province, the fief of the powerful warlord Ismail Khan. Fighting involving artillery and tanks was continuing south of the city of Herat, around Shindand yesterday afternoon, said Mohammadullah Afzali, the Foreign Ministry representative in Herat.
NEWS
By Adriana Lins de Albuquerque and Michael O'Hanlon | October 13, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Three years after the Bush administration led a remarkably quick and bold military operation to overthrow the Taliban, and only days after the country's presidential election, many challenges face Afghanistan's newly elected leader in the years ahead. The big question is how much the United States will continue to help. There has been considerable progress in Afghanistan since the Taliban were overthrown in 2001. But that's largely because things were so bad under the Taliban, not because they are good now. And unfortunately, the current "security-lite" strategy being followed by the United States and its NATO partners does not inspire confidence that Afghanistan will soon do better.
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 13, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - Hundreds of people rioted in the western city of Herat yesterday, attacking United Nations offices and shouting anti-American slogans to protest a powerful warlord's removal as provincial governor. Various news agencies reported that three to eight people were killed and dozens injured in the rioting; Afghan government officials in Kabul had initially insisted that no one had died. Protests began after Ismail Khan, who ruled Herat province - the country's richest - was removed from his post Saturday and was asked to become the federal minister of mines and industries.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - The Afghan government announced yesterday the removal of the powerful governor of Herat, in western Afghanistan, one of the country's longest-standing warlords. The move appeared to be designed to undercut the governor, one of the major opponents to President Hamid Karzai, before the Oct. 9 presidential elections. The removal of the governor, Ismail Khan, is momentous for the central government, which has tried without success to reduce his power or remove him for the past two years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - Twenty-one people, including two senior Defense Ministry commanders, were killed in heavy factional fighting overnight in the western province of Herat, in another upset for Afghanistan as it prepares for elections, Afghan officials said yesterday. In what appeared to be coordinated attacks, forces from three neighboring provinces moved on districts in Herat Province, the fief of the powerful warlord Ismail Khan. Fighting involving artillery and tanks was continuing south of the city of Herat, around Shindand yesterday afternoon, said Mohammadullah Afzali, the Foreign Ministry representative in Herat.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghanistan's minister for civil aviation, who is the son of one of the country's most powerful warlords, was killed yesterday as fighting broke out in Herat. It was some of the worst violence in Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban more than two years ago. While accounts were conflicting over what set off the fighting, officials in Herat in western Afghanistan said it began after a failed assassination attempt against the warlord Ismail Khan, who is also the provincial governor.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 23, 2003
HERAT, Afghanistan - Peace reigns, finally, in this province bordering Iran, which is no small accomplishment given the number of wars here over the past decades, and given the violence that continues elsewhere in Afghanistan. There is a show of orderliness in Herat's refurbished government buildings, on streets that have been paved and widened, in schools newly built, at the hospital set amid gardens, an institution that is working as well as it has in living memory. The discipline and quiet, though, cannot be attributed to the postwar efforts of the United States and its allies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - The Afghan government announced yesterday the removal of the powerful governor of Herat, in western Afghanistan, one of the country's longest-standing warlords. The move appeared to be designed to undercut the governor, one of the major opponents to President Hamid Karzai, before the Oct. 9 presidential elections. The removal of the governor, Ismail Khan, is momentous for the central government, which has tried without success to reduce his power or remove him for the past two years.
SPORTS
By BOB PICKERING | March 6, 1999
Today: Three stakes winners over Laurel's main surface are among eight colts and geldings entered for the Herat Stakes. The Herat, going as the ninth event on a 10-race card, is worth $50,000 in purse money and will be run at 1 1/16 miles. Harry and Tom Meyerhoff's Perfect Score will be one of the choices. The son of Personal Hope crashed the stakes ranks by winning the Bobby Hale last August at Timonium.Tomorrow: Eight fillies, including Sandi Kleeman's entry of Po and Moon Child, have passed the entry box for the Landaura Stakes.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2002
It's not the bombs falling from U.S. warplanes or the years of drought or the shortage of doctors and medicine to treat disease that is killing the women in Afghanistan. They are courting death by giving life. Childbirth is the leading cause of death for Afghan women, many of whom have not seen the inside of a school or a hospital for years and who have a life expectancy of just 46 years. About 90 percent of women have their babies at home on their own. It can take days to reach a hospital, which is often not worth the trip.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - Pentagon officials acknowledged yesterday that two U.S. bombing runs on military targets in Afghanistan over the weekend went astray, striking near a senior citizens' home outside the western city of Herat and in a residential neighborhood north of the capital, Kabul. Victoria Clarke, the Pentagon's spokeswoman, said a Navy F/A-18 Hornet missed its intended target Sunday morning and "inadvertently dropped a 1,000-pound bomb in an open area near a senior citizens' home outside Herat."
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