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By Phil Hersh and Phil Hersh,Chicago Tribune | August 2, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- For the first time in seven years, a rival is close enough after one day of the heptathlon to annoy Jackie Joyner-Kersee on the second day.But it isn't Sabine Braun's position in the standings that bothers the defending Olympic champion. Joyner-Kersee has become irritated by the closeness of the German's coaches during lulls in the first day of the competition, which lasted 11 hours of a sweltering Barcelona day."There is something about Braun and her camp that doesn't rub you the right way," Joyner-Kersee said.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
Baltimore native Ryan Olkowski is among the men trying to deny Paul Terek a third consecutive national indoor heptathlon title this weekend. They'll run, jump and throw today and tomorrow in Chapel Hill, N.C., where the women's pentathlon will be contested concurrently in the USA Indoor Combined Events Championships. Olkowski, a 1998 graduate of Calvert Hall who sprinted and jumped for Penn State before trying his first decathlon in 2003, has the nation's leading mark in indoor track's scaled-down version of the test that defines the "world's greatest athlete" at the Summer Olympics.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | June 22, 1992
NEW ORLEANS -- Even legends struggle.It was hot. The sun beat down on the metal bleachers. Spectators wrapped their heads in towels drenched with water.This was no time to sprint. So Jackie Joyner-Kersee jogged. And then, she walked the final two steps across the finish line.Joyner-Kersee won another women's heptathlon title at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials yesterday. On paper, it was easy. But out on the track, through two days, starting with the 100-meter hurdles Saturday and finishing six events later in the 800 yesterday, it was an ordeal.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2000
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Marla Runyan is energized by her status as an Olympian, but long weary of the adjective that will precede it: blind. Runyan made history Sunday at the U.S. track and field trials, when she became the first legally blind athlete to qualify for the Olympic Games. She will go to Sydney, Australia, as the most intriguing member of an American 1,500 meters entry that has medal contenders in Regina Jacobs and Suzy Favor Hamilton. Runyan has two gold medals of her own at her home in Eugene, Ore. She won the gold medal in the heptathlon at both Barcelona in 1992 and Atlanta in '96. They came in the Paralympics, however, after the international media had gone home and the disabled athletes taken the stage.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- Jackie Joyner-Kersee's hamstring problems began earlier this year and flared up again here at last month's U.S. Olympic trials, when they contributed to her losing her first completed heptathlon since the 1984 Olympics and her first on American soil since 1983.It was only a foreshadowing of what happened yesterday.Going for her third straight Olympic gold medal, Joyner-Kersee reinjured the leg while running in the 110-meter hurdles, the opening event of the heptathlon, at Olympic Stadium.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1996
ATLANTA -- The 10-day U.S. Olympic track and field trials took an interesting twist within an hour after they began yesterday at Olympic Stadium.Three-time Olympian and two-time Olympic women's heptathlon gold medalist Jackie Joyner-Kersee twisted her left ankle on her first attempt at the high jump."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
Baltimore native Ryan Olkowski is among the men trying to deny Paul Terek a third consecutive national indoor heptathlon title this weekend. They'll run, jump and throw today and tomorrow in Chapel Hill, N.C., where the women's pentathlon will be contested concurrently in the USA Indoor Combined Events Championships. Olkowski, a 1998 graduate of Calvert Hall who sprinted and jumped for Penn State before trying his first decathlon in 2003, has the nation's leading mark in indoor track's scaled-down version of the test that defines the "world's greatest athlete" at the Summer Olympics.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
ATLANTA -- Jackie Joyner-Kersee made her fourth U.S. Olympic team last night, but something strange happened in the last three events of the heptathlon. Joyner-Kersee lost her lead and, for the first time since 1984, lost a heptathlon competition that she completed."In all honesty, I don't like losing," said Joyner-Kersee, who came into the final event leading by 116 points. She wound up losing to Kelly Blair by a mere three points after finishing next-to-last in the 800 meters.It was her first loss in a completed heptathlon since finishing behind Glynis Nunn of Australia in the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | August 1, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- The world's greatest women's athlete is 30 years old and suddenly vulnerable.A strained right hamstring is healed, but the memory of the pain still lingers. She no longer crushes the spirit of her rivals with unreachable numbers, and soaring leaps.Jackie Joyner-Kersee's greatest foe isn't an opponent, it's herself.She is trying to duplicate what amounts to track and field perfection. Four years ago, she came to the Summer Games of Seoul, South Korea and took away gold medals in the long jump and women's heptathlon.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- Jackie Joyner-Kersee's hamstring problems began earlier this year and flared up again here at last month's U.S. Olympic trials, when they contributed to her losing her first completed heptathlon since the 1984 Olympics and her first on American soil since 1983.It was only a foreshadowing of what happened yesterday.Going for her third straight Olympic gold medal, Joyner-Kersee reinjured the leg while running in the 110-meter hurdles, the opening event of the heptathlon, at Olympic Stadium.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- The emotional hangover was apparent last night at Olympic Stadium. The electricity from Thursday night's magical events were gone. Michael Johnson and Dan O'Brien were nowhere to be found.And, so it seemed, was Jackie Joyner-Kersee.Joyner-Kersee, the Olympic record holder in the long jump and the 1988 Olympic champion, had barely made the cut for the finals. And, once she got there, Joyner-Kersee seemed to be going backward.She fouled on her first attempt.She jumped only 21 feet, 3 1/4 inches on her next one.She had one jump left.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- Jackie Joyner-Kersee's hamstring problems began earlier this year and flared up again here at last month's U.S. Olympic trials, when they contributed to her losing her first completed heptathlon since the 1984 Olympics and her first on American soil since 1983.It was only a foreshadowing of what happened yesterday.Going for her third straight Olympic gold medal, Joyner-Kersee reinjured the leg while running in the 110-meter hurdles, the opening event of the heptathlon, at Olympic Stadium.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- Jackie Joyner-Kersee's hamstring problems began earlier this year and flared up again here at last month's U.S. Olympic trials, when they contributed to her losing her first completed heptathlon since the 1984 Olympics and her first on American soil since 1983.It was only a foreshadowing of what happened yesterday.Going for her third straight Olympic gold medal, Joyner-Kersee reinjured the leg while running in the 110-meter hurdles, the opening event of the heptathlon, at Olympic Stadium.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
ATLANTA -- Jackie Joyner-Kersee made her fourth U.S. Olympic team last night, but something strange happened in the last three events of the heptathlon. Joyner-Kersee lost her lead and, for the first time since 1984, lost a heptathlon competition that she completed."In all honesty, I don't like losing," said Joyner-Kersee, who came into the final event leading by 116 points. She wound up losing to Kelly Blair by a mere three points after finishing next-to-last in the 800 meters.It was her first loss in a completed heptathlon since finishing behind Glynis Nunn of Australia in the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1996
ATLANTA -- The 10-day U.S. Olympic track and field trials took an interesting twist within an hour after they began yesterday at Olympic Stadium.Three-time Olympian and two-time Olympic women's heptathlon gold medalist Jackie Joyner-Kersee twisted her left ankle on her first attempt at the high jump."
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Staff Writer | August 3, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Jackie Joyner-Kersee had just completed her victory lap when Bruce Jenner put his arm around her neck and said, "May I say heartiest congratulations to the greatest ever."Jenner, the 1976 Olympic decathlon champion, didn't just mean the greatest heptathlete ever. He called Joyner-Kersee the "greatest multi-event athlete in history, man or woman."That's lofty praise, but Joyner-Kersee has now won a silver medal and two golds in the only three Olympic heptathlons ever contested -- and a tight hamstring is frequently cited as the reason for her narrow five-point defeat in 1984.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2000
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Marla Runyan is energized by her status as an Olympian, but long weary of the adjective that will precede it: blind. Runyan made history Sunday at the U.S. track and field trials, when she became the first legally blind athlete to qualify for the Olympic Games. She will go to Sydney, Australia, as the most intriguing member of an American 1,500 meters entry that has medal contenders in Regina Jacobs and Suzy Favor Hamilton. Runyan has two gold medals of her own at her home in Eugene, Ore. She won the gold medal in the heptathlon at both Barcelona in 1992 and Atlanta in '96. They came in the Paralympics, however, after the international media had gone home and the disabled athletes taken the stage.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- The emotional hangover was apparent last night at Olympic Stadium. The electricity from Thursday night's magical events were gone. Michael Johnson and Dan O'Brien were nowhere to be found.And, so it seemed, was Jackie Joyner-Kersee.Joyner-Kersee, the Olympic record holder in the long jump and the 1988 Olympic champion, had barely made the cut for the finals. And, once she got there, Joyner-Kersee seemed to be going backward.She fouled on her first attempt.She jumped only 21 feet, 3 1/4 inches on her next one.She had one jump left.
SPORTS
By Phil Hersh and Phil Hersh,Chicago Tribune | August 2, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- For the first time in seven years, a rival is close enough after one day of the heptathlon to annoy Jackie Joyner-Kersee on the second day.But it isn't Sabine Braun's position in the standings that bothers the defending Olympic champion. Joyner-Kersee has become irritated by the closeness of the German's coaches during lulls in the first day of the competition, which lasted 11 hours of a sweltering Barcelona day."There is something about Braun and her camp that doesn't rub you the right way," Joyner-Kersee said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | August 1, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- The world's greatest women's athlete is 30 years old and suddenly vulnerable.A strained right hamstring is healed, but the memory of the pain still lingers. She no longer crushes the spirit of her rivals with unreachable numbers, and soaring leaps.Jackie Joyner-Kersee's greatest foe isn't an opponent, it's herself.She is trying to duplicate what amounts to track and field perfection. Four years ago, she came to the Summer Games of Seoul, South Korea and took away gold medals in the long jump and women's heptathlon.
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