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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2007
The music season could end right now and I wouldn't complain much, because I could bask indefinitely in the afterglow of hearing Ben Heppner sing "Roses of Picardy" Sunday night. The tenor's performance of that wistful song from 1916, the third and final encore in his fabulous recital for the Shriver Hall Concert Series, sent me out into the drizzly air on a rare high. I admit I'm an easy pushover for old ballads like "Roses of Picardy," one of the most beguiling of World War I-era songs, but it takes an uncommon singer to make them sound fresh and substantive today (or to even think of performing them)
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 5, 2008
Leo Darrold DeWain Heppner, a retired nuclear physicist and avid astronomer who was a co-founder of the Harford County Astronomical Society, died Monday of complications from colon surgery at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The longtime Havre de Grace resident was 86. Mr. Heppner was born in Wilmot, S.D., and raised on his family's farm in Genesee, Idaho. His interest in astronomy began when he was a child and he constructed his first telescope. He enlisted in the Army during World War II, and served as a sergeant with an infantry unit in Europe.
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NEWS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,Staff writer | February 6, 1991
Sometimes an athlete just kind of walks into a college scholarship unexpectedly.That's how it happened for Al Heppner of Howard High.Come September of 1992 Heppner expects to attend the University of Wisconsin-Parkside on a full tuition scholarship awarded for his prowess in the arcane sport of race walking.Three years ago Heppnerhad never heard of race walking.What the heck is race walking? The sport requires athletes to walk as fast as possible while keeping one foot in contact with the ground at all times.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2007
The music season could end right now and I wouldn't complain much, because I could bask indefinitely in the afterglow of hearing Ben Heppner sing "Roses of Picardy" Sunday night. The tenor's performance of that wistful song from 1916, the third and final encore in his fabulous recital for the Shriver Hall Concert Series, sent me out into the drizzly air on a rare high. I admit I'm an easy pushover for old ballads like "Roses of Picardy," one of the most beguiling of World War I-era songs, but it takes an uncommon singer to make them sound fresh and substantive today (or to even think of performing them)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 5, 2008
Leo Darrold DeWain Heppner, a retired nuclear physicist and avid astronomer who was a co-founder of the Harford County Astronomical Society, died Monday of complications from colon surgery at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The longtime Havre de Grace resident was 86. Mr. Heppner was born in Wilmot, S.D., and raised on his family's farm in Genesee, Idaho. His interest in astronomy began when he was a child and he constructed his first telescope. He enlisted in the Army during World War II, and served as a sergeant with an infantry unit in Europe.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
ASHBURN, Va. - Immediately after his team's 16-15 loss Sunday to the Arizona Cardinals, Washington Redskins coach Norv Turner was asked if he would look for a new special teams coach. Turner responded in the negative. A day later, he did not give the same assurance to those who play on special teams. While coach LeCharls McDaniel's job apparently is not in jeopardy, some members of the unit that gave up 183 kickoff-return yards to Cardinals receiver MarTay Jenkins are in trouble. "We have guys on special teams that don't play offense or defense," Turner said.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2004
CHULA VISTA, Calif. -- Al Heppner took a huge gamble in the highest-stakes race of his life. Heppner, a 29-year-old race walker from Columbia, Md., opened a big lead during the first 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) of the U.S. Olympic trials 50-kilometer (31.1-mile) event yesterday on the roads of the Chula Vista Marina, and seemed to be booking his dream ticket to the August games in Athens, Greece. But it turned into a nightmare. He faded to fifth place and labored over the finish line in 4 hours, 23 minutes, 52 seconds, in a race won by Duke alumnus Curt Clausen, 36, of the New York Athletic Club in 3:58:24.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | April 27, 1993
Amichai Heppner spent much of his childhood hiding in windmills and chicken houses and behind brick walls. His game of hide and seek was not from other children, but from Nazi sympathizers.Now, at 59, Mr. Heppner tells his story of the Holocaust to people like those who gathered at Rachelle Hurwitz's home in Uniontown on Sunday night to remember the Jews slaughtered in Warsaw during World War II."Like other Holocaust survivors, I didn't want to talk about it," Mr. Heppner told the ecumenical crowd of about 40 people as he showed slides of his family, his homeland and pictures he drew as a pre-teen child in hiding in the Netherlands.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | April 27, 1993
Amichai Heppner spent much of his childhood hiding in windmills and chicken houses and behind brick walls. His game of hide and seek was not from other children, but from Nazi sympathizers.Now, at 59, Mr. Heppner tells his story of the Holocaust to people like those who gathered at Rachelle Hurwitz's home in Uniontown on Sunday night to remember the Jews slaughtered in Warsaw during World War II."Like other Holocaust survivors, I didn't want to talk about it," Mr. Heppner told the ecumenical crowd of about 40 people as he showed slides of his family, his homeland and pictures he drew as a pre-teen child in hiding in the Netherlands.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
On Friday, October 17, 2003 HATTIE SHIRLEY GLEIMAN (nee Barshop); beloved wife of the late Irvin J. Gleiman; devoted mother of Nettye Heppner of Park Forest, IL and Donald Gleiman of Reisterstown, MD; dear mother-in-law of Ben Heppner and Bunnie Gleiman; devoted sister of Rose Rubin of Roosevelt Island, NY and the late Harold Barshop, Sadie Keiser and Sophie Schneider; loving grandmother of Jeffrey and Tracey Jacobson, Rob and Marcie Glennon, Julie Gleiman...
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 29, 2007
The first time Ben Heppner encountered opera - on a television broadcast when he was growing up in Western Canada - it all sounded totally alien. Years later, he not only got over that initial impression, but found himself hailed as one of the greatest gifts to the world of opera in a long, long time. If you go Ben Heppner, accompanied by pianist Thomas Muraco, will give a recital at 5:30 p.m. Sunday at Shriver Hall, the Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St. Tickets are $19 and $39. Call 410-516-7164 or go to shriverconcerts.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 29, 2004
BOSTON - She's 37 now, ancient by big-time track and field standards. But no one's daring to suggest that three-time Olympic gold medalist Gail Devers is slowing down. Far from it. Thirty-four years after Chi Cheng of Taiwan won women's sprint and hurdles titles at the USA Indoor Track and Field Championships, Devers duplicated the feat yesterday at the Reggie Lewis Center. After breezing through her trial heat of the 60-meter hurdles in 7.97 seconds and her 60-meter dash prelim in 7.11, the Duluth, Ga.-based Devers came back just under two hours later to take both finals, the hurdles in 7.81 over Joanna Hayes' 7.91, and the dash in 7.12, just three-thousandths of a second in front of Torri Edwards in a virtual dead heat.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2004
LOS ANGELES - A memorial service for Al Heppner, the Olympic race walking team candidate from Columbia, Md., who apparently took his life in a leap from a bridge Wednesday, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, Calif. A scholarship fund in his name will be started by the North American Racewalking Foundation, based in Pasadena, Calif., announced Elaine Ward, the foundation director. "I had no clue, none whatsoever, that Al might have been contemplating something like this," said Tim Seaman of North Babylon, N.Y., his national race walking team friend and training partner in the Chula Vista-based group.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2004
Twice in his short life, Albert Heppner nearly caught up to his Olympic dreams. Twice, they sped away. The athlete, who started race walking on a $1 bet at Howard High School and battled injuries and doubts throughout his career, apparently took his life Wednesday night in California after he failed to make the U.S. Olympic team Sunday. He was 29. Heppner's body was found by his teammates and police officers under some brush below a 250-foot-high highway bridge in a mountainous area of San Diego County.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2004
CHULA VISTA, Calif. -- Al Heppner took a huge gamble in the highest-stakes race of his life. Heppner, a 29-year-old race walker from Columbia, Md., opened a big lead during the first 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) of the U.S. Olympic trials 50-kilometer (31.1-mile) event yesterday on the roads of the Chula Vista Marina, and seemed to be booking his dream ticket to the August games in Athens, Greece. But it turned into a nightmare. He faded to fifth place and labored over the finish line in 4 hours, 23 minutes, 52 seconds, in a race won by Duke alumnus Curt Clausen, 36, of the New York Athletic Club in 3:58:24.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
On Friday, October 17, 2003 HATTIE SHIRLEY GLEIMAN (nee Barshop); beloved wife of the late Irvin J. Gleiman; devoted mother of Nettye Heppner of Park Forest, IL and Donald Gleiman of Reisterstown, MD; dear mother-in-law of Ben Heppner and Bunnie Gleiman; devoted sister of Rose Rubin of Roosevelt Island, NY and the late Harold Barshop, Sadie Keiser and Sophie Schneider; loving grandmother of Jeffrey and Tracey Jacobson, Rob and Marcie Glennon, Julie Gleiman...
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2002
PALO ALTO, Calif. - For James Carter, the vision to be great has been there since his days at Baltimore's Mervo High and Hampton University. "I always dreamed of being the best in the nation and the best in the world," he tells people. And now that dream is halfway to reality. With a commanding 48.12-second performance in the final of the 400-meter hurdles at the 127th annual USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships yesterday, Carter was crowned America's best and now prepares to face the world's best on the European circuit.
NEWS
By Howard County Striders | February 19, 1992
GeriAnn Bell dazzled a strong women's 10K field Sunday afternoon at the Strider races in Thunder Hill.Quite early in the race, Bell shook off "Woman Runner of 1991" Denise Underwood-Hannagan and champion triathlete Janelle McIntyre, both of whom gave up the chase well before the 5-kilometer turnaround.Although a stiff breeze slowed her return time, Bell finished ninth overall with a time of 41 minutes, 27 seconds, a women's course record.Chris Samley and Jim Carbary thought they were running a good pace when they passed the 2-mile mark in 11:20, tied for the lead of the men's 10K race.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2002
PALO ALTO, Calif. - For James Carter, the vision to be great has been there since his days at Baltimore's Mervo High and Hampton University. "I always dreamed of being the best in the nation and the best in the world," he tells people. And now that dream is halfway to reality. With a commanding 48.12-second performance in the final of the 400-meter hurdles at the 127th annual USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships yesterday, Carter was crowned America's best and now prepares to face the world's best on the European circuit.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
ASHBURN, Va. - Immediately after his team's 16-15 loss Sunday to the Arizona Cardinals, Washington Redskins coach Norv Turner was asked if he would look for a new special teams coach. Turner responded in the negative. A day later, he did not give the same assurance to those who play on special teams. While coach LeCharls McDaniel's job apparently is not in jeopardy, some members of the unit that gave up 183 kickoff-return yards to Cardinals receiver MarTay Jenkins are in trouble. "We have guys on special teams that don't play offense or defense," Turner said.
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