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Henry Walters

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NEWS
July 26, 1999
THE Walters Art Gallery is one of the world's great museums in the breadth and quality of its art of many civilizations. Henry Walters collected with passion, knowledge and wealth, building on the work of his father, William T. Walters. It was Henry -- a secretive man -- who collected a museum of the world's culture and then donated it as the heritage of the people of Baltimore. The gift was unexpected. Henry died at his home in Manhattan, age 83, in 1931. Speculation swirled about the disposition of his art. His will, filed in Baltimore Orphans Court, left the collection of 20,000 objects, the art gallery, the family home at 5 W. Mount Vernon Place and one-fourth of his estate as an endowment to the city "for the benefit of the public."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Hackerman House, one of the three buildings that make up the Walters Art Museum , will be closed for about two and a half years beginning July 1, a museum official announced Friday. In addition, galleries housing 19 t h century art on the fourth floor of the Centre Street building will be closed to the public between June 23 and Oct. 25, according to museum spokeswoman Mona M. Rock. It's all part of a long-planned, $5.2 million refurbishment of the museum. Most of the work will involve replacing the 23-year-old fire suppression and climate control systems, Rock said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 16, 2002
In "Ode to a Grecian Urn," the 19th-century Romantic poet John Keats described a pair of lovers on the side of an ancient vase who exist in a timeless realm forever removed from the onrushing tide of history. Keats' idea of a timeless, ideal realm of art was the conventional wisdom of his era. But as the century wore on, it became more and more tenuous as a guide for creative artists. The 19th century was an age of unprecedented, rapid change. The invention of railroads, the telegraph and industrial mass production, the rise of universal literacy and a popular press, the expansion of cities and the huge accumulations of capital in business all served to shrink space and time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Henry Walters and J.P. Morgan were frenemies. Both were the sons of powerful fathers. They didn't come into their own until they reached middle age, when they were widely acknowledged as two of the premier financiers of the Gilded Age. Both displayed an inclination toward collecting art as children. As grown-ups, the two titans competed over who would acquire the next painting or objet d'art. So it's only fitting that portions of a 2,000-year-old Egyptian papyrus known as "The Book of the Faiyum" belonging to institutions founded by each mogul are being displayed for the first time in 150 years in a new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum . "There was this kind of early-20th-century friendly rivalry between J.P. Morgan and Henry Walters," says Julia Marciari-Alexander," the director of the Baltimore museum.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF WRITER | October 16, 2000
The fat porcelain jar seems large enough to hold many secrets. It sits alone on a pedestal in the Walters Art Gallery, a colorful vessel just knee high and, if truth be told, rather stout. Bright orange enamel fish swoop and swirl on its sides, their curving bodies echoing the fullness of its shape. Henry Walters, who in 1931 bequeathed his art collection to the city, left barely a word about the jar's purchase, sometime between 1894 and 1908. Experts could have told him at the time that the jar dated from China's Ming dynasty, which ranged from 1368 to 1644, and was probably used on ceremonial occasions to hold wine.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | July 15, 1993
Henry Walters assembled almost unbelievably wide-ranging holdings for a single collector -- from Impressionist paintings to // medieval arms, from ancient Greek vases to Faberge bibelots.Inevitably, he could not be equally interested in everything. But one of his principal interests was his extraordinary collection of manuscripts and rare books, which he bought individually, on his trips to Europe, many of them from the Parisian bookbinder and bookseller Leon Gruel.He also had Gruel create sumptuous bindings for some of his books and acquired various other things from the firm, such as medieval ivories.
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY and HOLLY SELBY,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1995
Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan is expected to rule later this week whether the Maryland Institute, College of Art may sell all or part of its renowned Lucas Collection -- or whether that question should be decided next spring in a trial.The collection, which includes thousands of prints, oil paintings and sculptures, was given to the institute in 1910 by Henry Walters. Considered one of the most important bequests ever made in Baltimore, it has been on loan to the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Gallery since 1933.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
All it took was a brief scan of the crowd at the Walters Art Museum gala to notice there was a little something different at this party. A bright red miter drifted amid a sea of bobbing bare heads. A set of enormous puffed velvet sleeves rubbed shoulders with dozens of traditional tuxedos. A gold lame toga twinkled alongside scores of cocktail dresses and gowns. This was "A Night In The Museum," where guests were encouraged to wear either black-tie attire or a costume inspired by one of the museum's paintings.
NEWS
August 16, 1996
THE WALTERS ART GALLERY has made a substantial advance in the acquisition of 17 works of Ethiopian Christian art, most of which are now on public view. This complements its holdings in Armenian, Russian, Greek and early Italian Christian devotional art.This addition to the collection flows naturally from the Walters' xTC stunning introduction of Ethiopian religious art to Americans in its 1993 show, which fed its own interest and reputation, indirectly leading to this purchase and extended loan.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 2, 2006
A reader recently directed my attention to a copy of Washing `The Great Unwashed:' Public Baths in Urban America 1840-1920, by Marilyn Thornton Williams, a college professor, whose 1991 book chronicles the almost-forgotten public bath movement that blossomed during the 19th century. Urban social reformers pushed the many benefits that could be derived by regular bathing in addition to personal cleanliness and freedom from infectious diseases. Regular bathing also gave one a certain middle-class respectability, whether one was middle class or not. Having a relationship with hot water, a bar of soap and a clean towel was a necessary and good thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
On her first official day of work, Julia Marciari-Alexander heads down to the basement of the Walters Art Museum to say hello to a room full of squirmy 8-, 9- and 10-year-olds attending summer camp. A girl with curly, brown hair looks up from the strand of wire she's twisting with a pair of pliers to form the framework of a small animal. "What does a museum director do?," she asks Marciari-Alexander. All of Baltimore's arts community is waiting to find out how the Walters' new leader will answer that question.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
The view of a 16th-century Lisbon street is such a teeming hodgepodge of races, social classes and religions and has so much life on display - much of it mischievous - that's it hard not to smile. Slightly to the right of center, an African man wearing the wide pants of a sailor dances with a stranger. He's trying to embrace a middle-aged white woman carrying a jug, who recoils in surprise. Toward the left, two Jewish policemen - identifiable by their long beards and armbands - support a sheepish-looking black prisoner who appears to be drunk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Baltimore's Walters Art Museum has received a $265,000 National Endowment for the Humanities grant to put toward digitizing its collection of medieval manuscripts and making it available, via computer, to the general public. The three-year project, "Imaging the Hours: Creating a Digital Resource of Flemish Manuscripts," includes 113 illustrated manuscripts, encompassing 45,000 pages of text with over 3,000 pages of illumination — elaborate illustrations, such as stylized letters or border decorations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
In one of the largest gifts ever received by Baltimore's Walters Art Museum , a New Mexico collector is donating some 300 pieces and promising a $4 million bequest to shine a spotlight on the art of the ancient Americas. "This is a huge development for us," said Walters director Gary Vikan, noting that the soon-to-be-created center for the study of the arts of the ancient Americas should prove especially alluring to the area's "very vibrant" Latino community. "This is a huge new ingredient in building audience for us," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 6, 2010
The prized collection of medieval manuscripts at the Walters Art Museum - about 38,000 pages - is heading out of its usual, controlled environment and into the light. The light of computer screens, that is. Thanks to a $315,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, 105 medieval manuscripts from several centuries and cultures will be digitally photographed, cataloged and distributed during the next two and a half years. "This gives us the chance to make accessible, and for free on everybody's desktop, some of the greatest works of art from the Middle Ages [housed]
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 5, 2009
In a quiet, windowless room deep inside the Walters Art Museum, a digitization specialist places a 900-year-old Quran into the cradle of the Stokes Imaging System. She turns a page, lowers a wedge to hold the book in place, and snaps a picture. She raises the wedge, turns the page, lowers the wedge, and repeats. And repeats. And repeats. It's painstaking work, photographing one of the most important collections of Islamic manuscripts in North America, and slow. But scholars say the two-year project has put the Baltimore museum at the vanguard of a movement that is transforming the study of ancient texts.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | November 3, 2007
As Walters Art Museum conservator Elissa O'Loughlin pulled back the lid to one of two wooden crates left in the museum's attic for decades, Gary Vikan broke the tension. "Oh, my God, not another Monet! We have much too many of those," the museum's director said. The audience burst into laughter. Vikan was standing too far away to see the crates' contents -- volumes of well-preserved black, leather-bound photo albums and one box. O'Loughlin opened the box and removed an 80-page red leather book.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Henry Walters and J.P. Morgan were frenemies. Both were the sons of powerful fathers. They didn't come into their own until they reached middle age, when they were widely acknowledged as two of the premier financiers of the Gilded Age. Both displayed an inclination toward collecting art as children. As grown-ups, the two titans competed over who would acquire the next painting or objet d'art. So it's only fitting that portions of a 2,000-year-old Egyptian papyrus known as "The Book of the Faiyum" belonging to institutions founded by each mogul are being displayed for the first time in 150 years in a new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum . "There was this kind of early-20th-century friendly rivalry between J.P. Morgan and Henry Walters," says Julia Marciari-Alexander," the director of the Baltimore museum.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2009
All it took was a brief scan of the crowd at the Walters Art Museum gala to notice there was a little something different at this party. A bright red miter drifted amid a sea of bobbing bare heads. A set of enormous puffed velvet sleeves rubbed shoulders with dozens of traditional tuxedos. A gold lame toga twinkled alongside scores of cocktail dresses and gowns. This was "A Night In The Museum," where guests were encouraged to wear either black-tie attire or a costume inspired by one of the museum's paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
Baltimore art collector Henry Walters had a great eye for painting and sculpture, but he also had a thing for bling. While he was expanding the art collection that his father William began assembling in the mid 1800s, Henry amassed one of the most wide-ranging private jewelry collections in the U.S., including works by Tiffany & Co., Rene Lalique and others. His greatest finds form the core of Bedazzled: 5000 Years of Jewelry, a lavish exhibit that opens today and runs through Jan. 4, 2009, at the Walters Art Museum.
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