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NEWS
April 1, 2007
DUBLIN, Ireland -- Henry VIII is coming back to the throne. And this time, he's bloody gorgeous. Showtime's epic 10-part miniseries The Tudors holds court beginning tonight at 10 with Jonathan Rhys Meyers cast as the unlikely lead. And much like Henry VIII, the show's producers can't disguise their ambitions - to produce a show that finally gets Showtime an HBO-style hit, popular both with the Emmy nobility and peasants alike. They've invested an unprecedented $38 million and have spent millions more promoting it. "We are hoping to be back here filming for another two, three, maybe four years, because the material we have to work with is so rich and there's so much story to tell.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | August 31, 2009
When Nick Roberts went to his first Maryland Renaissance Festival four years ago, and took up the mallet for the "feat of strength" known as Thor's Hammer, he could barely drive the metal disk halfway up the tower toward the bell. Sunday, the Centreville, Va., native, who goes to the fair every year, heaved and grunted like a woodsman felling trees, ringing the bell eight times out of 10 as his fiancee, Tasha Harris, looked on. "I've been working out a bit," said Roberts, sweating under the afternoon sun that shone on about 13,000 boot- and bodice-clad revelers on Day 2 of the annual fair, which opened Saturday in Crownsville and runs every weekend through Oct. 25. "It helps you raise your game."
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2001
William G. Huttel, a professional actor with a booming voice and immense stature known for his portrayal of King Henry VIII at the Maryland Renaissance Festival in Crownsville, died Monday in Washington. Mr. Huttel suffered a heart attack, collapsing while shopping in Washington. He died at Greater Southeast Community Hospital in Washington. He was 48. A native of Forestville, Mr. Huttel graduated from Suitland High School and hoped to follow his father and serve in the Navy as a deep-sea diver.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | August 30, 2009
FILM 'My One and Only': Baltimore is ready for her close-up. Renee Zellweger was in town last summer, playing a '50s divorcee looking for love, and now the finished product is finally making its way to local theaters. Charm City stands in for a number of East Coast locales. And the Engineers Club, the streets of East Baltimore and Mount Vernon Place all make cameos. In theaters Friday. TV 'Glee': Fox's answer to "High School Musical" returns for a full season after a splashy sneak peek in May. Matthew Morrison (above)
NEWS
By Ann Hellmuth and Ann Hellmuth,Orlando Sentinel | February 7, 1993
THE WIVES OF HENRY VIII.Antonia Fraser.Knopf.$25. 479 pages.Mention the name Henry VIII and most people immediately conjure up visions of a monstrously fat, bearded man whose wives are remembered more by the manner of their departure than their contributions at court.But it has taken Antonia Fraser, a master at putting 16th-century monarchs into 20th-century perspective, to give the six women the substance they deserve. Ms. Fraser, author of "Mary Queen of Scots," performs that task with wit, intelligence and verve.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 13, 1998
The Royal Shakespeare Company has launched a month-long residency at Washington's Kennedy Center with Shakespeare's best-known play, "Hamlet," and one of his least-known plays, "Henry VIII."And, though both plays concern kings who married their brothers' widows, the productions couldn't be more different. Director Matthew Warchus' modern-dress "Hamlet" is a fresh look at an over-produced classic. But the chief distinguishing feature of director Gregory Doran's "Henry VIII" is merely that it offers a chance to see a rarely staged work (albeit, one with an extraordinary depiction of the wronged Katherine of Aragon)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
Fells Point's Vagabond Players present The Royal Gambit, a stage show in which the game of love involves many players. First produced in the 1950s by German playwright Hermann Gressieker, the two-hour play documents the life and times of Britain's King Henry VIII. The comedy-drama begins when the infamous king, known for beheading more than one of his six wives, dances with all of the women on a human-sized chess board. Although artistic license is used to place all six of the women together at the opening, the script that follows relies mainly upon the real history of his nearly 40-year reign.
FEATURES
By J.WYNN ROUSUCK | June 14, 1998
The Royal Shakespeare Company isn't just performing the works of its namesake during its month at the Kennedy Center.Theatergoers can also see one play that preceded Shakespeare (the morality play "Everyman") and one that followed him (Samuel Beckett's "Krapp's Last Tape").Even the other two Shakespeare plays that are part of the RSC residency are among the master's later, and lesser-known, works - "Cymbeline" and "Henry VIII." Here's the schedule: "Henry VIII," through June 21; "Krapp's Last Tape," June 17 and June 19; "Everyman," June 23-28; and "Cymbeline," June 24-July 5. Tickets range from $15 for "Krapp's Last Tape" to $65 for box seats to "Cymbeline."
NEWS
By Staff Report | August 30, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Three of the most famous episodes in British history and their subsequent depiction on film will be the focus of the Western Maryland College History Department's Fall Film Series.All of the films -- "The Private Life of Henry VIII," "That Hamilton Woman," and "Hope and Glory" -- are free and open to the public. They will be screened in the Decker College Center Pub )) and Grille."The Private Life of Henry VIII" presents the intimate side of the monarch with a great deal of humor.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | March 26, 2008
It's good to be Jonathan Rhys Meyers. This young actor - only 30, though acting since his teens - has hit his stride. He plays a new kind of Henry VIII in Showtime's opulent and sexy The Tudors. I met with Jonathan down in Manhattan's Soho, at the trendy 60 Thompson Street hotel. It was a chilly, rainy day, but Jonathan appeared wearing a tight, white T-shirt, cut to a deep clavicle-baring vee, a snug sweater over it - one button fastened to emphasize his small waist - and well-fitted jeans.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | March 26, 2008
It's good to be Jonathan Rhys Meyers. This young actor - only 30, though acting since his teens - has hit his stride. He plays a new kind of Henry VIII in Showtime's opulent and sexy The Tudors. I met with Jonathan down in Manhattan's Soho, at the trendy 60 Thompson Street hotel. It was a chilly, rainy day, but Jonathan appeared wearing a tight, white T-shirt, cut to a deep clavicle-baring vee, a snug sweater over it - one button fastened to emphasize his small waist - and well-fitted jeans.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | July 29, 2007
SHE MAY LOOK AND SOUND LIKE Paula Deen and she is really into food ("The only thing I don't like is boiled okra."), but Marcia S. Harris, president of the Restaurant Association of Maryland, doesn't have a TV show. However, she does like watching television -- including MTV -- and she admires Deen. "I love her exuberance for food, her lack of fear for food. Growing up in the south [Memphis, Tenn.] as I did, her kind of cooking is very appealing to me. There's nothing that butter hasn't made better."
NEWS
April 1, 2007
DUBLIN, Ireland -- Henry VIII is coming back to the throne. And this time, he's bloody gorgeous. Showtime's epic 10-part miniseries The Tudors holds court beginning tonight at 10 with Jonathan Rhys Meyers cast as the unlikely lead. And much like Henry VIII, the show's producers can't disguise their ambitions - to produce a show that finally gets Showtime an HBO-style hit, popular both with the Emmy nobility and peasants alike. They've invested an unprecedented $38 million and have spent millions more promoting it. "We are hoping to be back here filming for another two, three, maybe four years, because the material we have to work with is so rich and there's so much story to tell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
Fells Point's Vagabond Players present The Royal Gambit, a stage show in which the game of love involves many players. First produced in the 1950s by German playwright Hermann Gressieker, the two-hour play documents the life and times of Britain's King Henry VIII. The comedy-drama begins when the infamous king, known for beheading more than one of his six wives, dances with all of the women on a human-sized chess board. Although artistic license is used to place all six of the women together at the opening, the script that follows relies mainly upon the real history of his nearly 40-year reign.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2003
In an era in which romantic relationships often play out on reality shows, William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew remains a classic tale. Yet few people outside theatrical or literary circles are aware of its sequel, The Tamer Tamed, penned not by the great Bard himself, but a younger contemporary, John Fletcher. Rarely have audiences had the opportunity to see both plays performed by the same company, and in their entirety. In fact, the last known performance was in the 1600s.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole Mccauley and Mary Carole Mccauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | January 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - The large, extravagant handwriting has more ruffles and curlicues than a Christmas package, and it practically shouts self-confidence: "Thys Boke If Myne." This book is mine. And then he signs it, with a capital "P" for "Prince" so tall and plump that it dwarfs all the other letters on the page - as he seems to have believed that he dwarfed all other mortals. Could any inscription be more revealing? Could it possibly tell us more about the personality of that budding adolescent who later would become England's King Henry VIII?
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | July 29, 2007
SHE MAY LOOK AND SOUND LIKE Paula Deen and she is really into food ("The only thing I don't like is boiled okra."), but Marcia S. Harris, president of the Restaurant Association of Maryland, doesn't have a TV show. However, she does like watching television -- including MTV -- and she admires Deen. "I love her exuberance for food, her lack of fear for food. Growing up in the south [Memphis, Tenn.] as I did, her kind of cooking is very appealing to me. There's nothing that butter hasn't made better."
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2000
Robert Bolt's "A Man for All Seasons" is especially apt in a political season, which is one reason that Kittamaqundi Theater scheduled the historical play for November. The show opened at Kittamaqundi Community Church in Columbia last weekend; two more performances are scheduled at 8 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday. The high-stakes debating in "A Man for All Seasons" obviously strikes a chord at election time. But the drama's dispute between King Henry VIII and Sir Thomas More, Lord Chancellor of England, isn't completely in synch with America's current power struggle: In the play, the political loser is beheaded.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
BETHESDA - Rep. Constance A. Morella had managed to stay composed in public, even as election results served notice that her eight-term congressional career would soon come to an end. The maverick Republican, 71, whose campaign signs in the suburban Washington district read simply "Connie," had calmly stood up on election night and expressed her gratitude to supporters by quoting from Shakespeare: "For your great graces heaped upon me ... I can nothing...
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2001
William G. Huttel, a professional actor with a booming voice and immense stature known for his portrayal of King Henry VIII at the Maryland Renaissance Festival in Crownsville, died Monday in Washington. Mr. Huttel suffered a heart attack, collapsing while shopping in Washington. He died at Greater Southeast Community Hospital in Washington. He was 48. A native of Forestville, Mr. Huttel graduated from Suitland High School and hoped to follow his father and serve in the Navy as a deep-sea diver.
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