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Henry Moore

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By John Dorsey | August 27, 1998
Henry Moore, one of the most famous sculptors of the 20th century, developed a visual language that explored the relationship between abstraction and representation, especially with regard to the human form. Aside from sculpture, he was also known for drawings and prints. An exhibit of 27 of his prints and five maquettes (or small-scale models for sculptures) opens tomorrow at the Mitchell Gallery of St. John's College in Annapolis. As with his sculpture, the primary subject of these works is the human figure, but some works also reflect his interest in animals, including prints of elephant heads and sheep.
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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
William Hanson Moore IV, a descendant of Maryland's earliest settlers who for nearly three decades operated a company that installed custom burglar alarms, died last Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of heart failure. The Towson resident was 79. Born in Baltimore, Moore was the son of William H. "Dinty" Moore III, a renowned lacrosse coach at St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy who was a founder of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Father and son were direct descendants of Henry Moore, who settled in what is now Charles County in 1649, and John Hanson, who arrived in Maryland in 1653 and whose great-grandson of the same name was president of the first Continental Congress.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1998
The Elizabeth Myers Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis begins its 1998-1999 season of exhibits tomorrow when it spotlights 27 prints and five small sculpture models (called maquettes) crafted by the British artist Henry Moore."The Sculptor's Line: Henry Moore Prints and Maquettes" will be on display at the gallery through Oct. 10.Moore, who lived from 1898 to 1986, is best known for his abstract sculptures in bronze, wood and stone. In such works, he drew his inspiration from primitive sculptures, such as those found in Mexico.
NEWS
July 5, 2007
Jean Ramona Moore, a retired coronary care nurse, died of heart failure June 28 at St. Agnes Medical Center. The West Baltimore resident was 78. Born Jean Ramona Horsey in Baltimore and raised on Etting Street, she was a 1948 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of Maryland. She nursed at the Veterans Administration and U.S. Public Health Service hospitals before retiring in 1988. She worked in coronary care. She enjoyed making ceramics, and making her own outfits, as well as curtains and draperies.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1998
The Elizabeth Myers Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis begins its 1998-1999 season of exhibits tomorrow when it spotlights 27 prints and five small sculpture models (called maquettes) crafted by the British artist Henry Moore."The Sculptor's Line: Henry Moore Prints and Maquettes" will be on display at the gallery through Oct. 10.Moore, who lived from 1898 to 1986, is best known for his abstract sculptures in bronze, wood and stone. In such works, he drew his inspiration from primitive sculptures, such as those found in Mexico.
NEWS
July 5, 2007
Jean Ramona Moore, a retired coronary care nurse, died of heart failure June 28 at St. Agnes Medical Center. The West Baltimore resident was 78. Born Jean Ramona Horsey in Baltimore and raised on Etting Street, she was a 1948 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of Maryland. She nursed at the Veterans Administration and U.S. Public Health Service hospitals before retiring in 1988. She worked in coronary care. She enjoyed making ceramics, and making her own outfits, as well as curtains and draperies.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 12, 2004
The stuff of Dimitri Hadzi's sculpture, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through Saturday, has undergone a curious and surprising evolution in recent years. In his last solo show at Grimaldis, in 2001, the artist presented a series of modestly scaled abstract pieces that evoked the energy of ancient religious rites and Greek mythology. Rather than illustrating the ancient stories, these works recalled their monumental gravitas through carefully worked surfaces that clearly displayed the mark of the artist's own hand on such time-honored sculptural materials as stone and bronze.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
William Hanson Moore IV, a descendant of Maryland's earliest settlers who for nearly three decades operated a company that installed custom burglar alarms, died last Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of heart failure. The Towson resident was 79. Born in Baltimore, Moore was the son of William H. "Dinty" Moore III, a renowned lacrosse coach at St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy who was a founder of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Father and son were direct descendants of Henry Moore, who settled in what is now Charles County in 1649, and John Hanson, who arrived in Maryland in 1653 and whose great-grandson of the same name was president of the first Continental Congress.
NEWS
April 15, 2009
On April 12, 2009, JAMES HENRY MOORE, survived by five children Eugene, Wayne, Karen, Sonya, and Janet Moore, and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the WILLIAM C. BROWN COMMUNITY FUNERAL HOME P.A., 1206 W. North Avenue, on Thursday from 3 to 7 PM. Family will receive friends Friday 11:30 AM at Union Baptist Church, 1219 Druid Hill Avenue. Funeral services 12 noon.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | June 10, 1995
A Lansdowne man who was the assistant controller of the Medical & Chirugical Faculty of Maryland for 20 years has pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $500,000 from the organization, Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said.Phillip Henry Moore, 48, of the 2600 block of Willow Ave. admitted to stealing $552,817 from 1987 to 1993. Moore used his position to divert money from corporate accounts to his account at the Mercantile Safe Deposit & Trust Co.Moore is scheduled to be sentenced Aug. 16 by Baltimore Circuit Judge Clifton J. Gordy.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 12, 2004
The stuff of Dimitri Hadzi's sculpture, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through Saturday, has undergone a curious and surprising evolution in recent years. In his last solo show at Grimaldis, in 2001, the artist presented a series of modestly scaled abstract pieces that evoked the energy of ancient religious rites and Greek mythology. Rather than illustrating the ancient stories, these works recalled their monumental gravitas through carefully worked surfaces that clearly displayed the mark of the artist's own hand on such time-honored sculptural materials as stone and bronze.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1998
The Elizabeth Myers Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis begins its 1998-1999 season of exhibits tomorrow when it spotlights 27 prints and five small sculpture models (called maquettes) crafted by the British artist Henry Moore."The Sculptor's Line: Henry Moore Prints and Maquettes" will be on display at the gallery through Oct. 10.Moore, who lived from 1898 to 1986, is best known for his abstract sculptures in bronze, wood and stone. In such works, he drew his inspiration from primitive sculptures, such as those found in Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | August 27, 1998
Henry Moore, one of the most famous sculptors of the 20th century, developed a visual language that explored the relationship between abstraction and representation, especially with regard to the human form. Aside from sculpture, he was also known for drawings and prints. An exhibit of 27 of his prints and five maquettes (or small-scale models for sculptures) opens tomorrow at the Mitchell Gallery of St. John's College in Annapolis. As with his sculpture, the primary subject of these works is the human figure, but some works also reflect his interest in animals, including prints of elephant heads and sheep.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1998
The Elizabeth Myers Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis begins its 1998-1999 season of exhibits tomorrow when it spotlights 27 prints and five small sculpture models (called maquettes) crafted by the British artist Henry Moore."The Sculptor's Line: Henry Moore Prints and Maquettes" will be on display at the gallery through Oct. 10.Moore, who lived from 1898 to 1986, is best known for his abstract sculptures in bronze, wood and stone. In such works, he drew his inspiration from primitive sculptures, such as those found in Mexico.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 1, 2003
A 75-year-old man jailed for a year in Baltimore in the shooting of a younger woman has been charged with first-degree murder because she died two weeks ago of complications from her injuries, police said. John Henry Moore of Washington has been held at Central Booking and Intake Center since his arrest in the shooting Sept. 27 last year of Pamela Pryor-Bourouis of the first block of N. Smallwood St., said homicide Detective Frank Miller. Pryor-Bourouis, 33, was shot in the neck during an argument with a man in his van in the 1700 block of Frederick Ave. Moore was arrested nearby moments later, Miller said.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | June 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The whirlwind of euphoria that marked the landing of military helicopters here for last weekend's Desert Storm victory celebration had more of an impact than some people thought.A storm of flying footpath gravel created by hovering military helicopters damaged some of the 50 bronze sculptures in the Sculpture Gardens at Hirshhorn Museum on the Capitol Mall.Museum workers, who quickly cleaned off the sculptures and wrapped them in blankets to protect them from further possible damage, met yesterday to inventory the damage and tally the repair costs.
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